Search found 56 matches

by Less_Incidence
January 12th, 2016, 10:02 pm
Forum: Wright Stuff C
Topic: Propeller wobble
Replies: 7
Views: 1627

Re: Propeller wobble

There are 2 main possibilites. The first is that your prop shaft is bent. I would check to make sure that the bend in your prop shaft is at an exact 90 degree angle. The second is that the pitch is unbalanced between the two blades. I would use a pitch gauge to check if your blades are at the same a...
by Less_Incidence
December 17th, 2015, 6:45 am
Forum: Wright Stuff C
Topic: Photos/Videos
Replies: 11
Views: 2388

Re: Photos/Videos

Be very careful with those paper flaps. Most ESs will count them as part of your wing chord, and could tier you down. Other than that, the design looks fine. The rudder is about 3 times as big as I would use, and I would try putting the stabilizer on adjustable posts. But if the model isn't flying a...
by Less_Incidence
December 14th, 2015, 6:21 am
Forum: Wright Stuff C
Topic: Paper Flaps for Aileron and Rudder?
Replies: 9
Views: 1753

Re: Paper Flaps for Aileron and Rudder?

Trying to use any kind of thinner on CA glue is a bad idea. All it will do is weaken the bonds formed by the glue. If you need thin CA, you'll need to buy some thin CA. Acetone is OK at debonding CA but it still takes a lot of effort. CA is very, very difficult to chemically alter once it's set. If ...
by Less_Incidence
December 13th, 2015, 12:11 pm
Forum: Wright Stuff C
Topic: Paper Flaps for Aileron and Rudder?
Replies: 9
Views: 1753

Re: Paper Flaps for Aileron and Rudder?

As far as I know there isn't any thinner that can effectively "dilute" CA glue.

Any hobby store will sell CA glue in various viscosities - thick, medium, and thin. I buy Insta-Cure (thin) and Insta-Cure+ (medium) brand CA from HobbyTown USA. I believe it's available at other places as well.
by Less_Incidence
December 8th, 2015, 5:07 pm
Forum: Wright Stuff C
Topic: Planform Shapes/Tips on Designing Own Planes
Replies: 4
Views: 1353

Re: Planform Shapes/Tips on Designing Own Planes

I'm going to second everything DoctaDave said above. The polyhedral is quite beneficial, and almost no more difficult to construct than standard dihedral. But the rectangular planform with lower wing loading is extremely likely to have benefits over the elliptical wing other than ease of constructio...
by Less_Incidence
December 8th, 2015, 3:48 pm
Forum: Wright Stuff C
Topic: Materials/Kits
Replies: 23
Views: 10238

Re: Materials/Kits

Wow, that looks like some really interesting variation from last year's design. The minimal tip plates replaced with huge dihedral, and an offset stab, probably due to the torque rolling problem that many of us have been experiencing. Looks like the airfoil thickness has gone up, and that rudder des...
by Less_Incidence
December 8th, 2015, 3:41 pm
Forum: Wright Stuff C
Topic: Balsa Wood
Replies: 8
Views: 3957

Re: Balsa Wood

Again, even laminated spars of that thickness are, as you've found, not going to be able to handle the aerodynamic loads on a relatively high-speed Wright Stuff airplane. My F1Ds are more than twice the size of Wright Stuff models and less than 1/5 the weight, and I still use spars more than 1/32" t...
by Less_Incidence
December 6th, 2015, 11:28 pm
Forum: Wright Stuff C
Topic: Over-all length
Replies: 1
Views: 808

Re: Over-all length

I use a 12" motor stick and a 13" tailboom. Theoretically, a model with a longer tail moment is more efficient. Theoretcially and practically, it's more stable. Also practically, the longer the tail moment gets, the wider the turning circle will inherently want to be. Initially, my tailboom was 18" ...
by Less_Incidence
December 6th, 2015, 11:21 pm
Forum: Wright Stuff C
Topic: Balsa Wood
Replies: 8
Views: 3957

Re: Balsa Wood

1/64" thick wood anywhere on a Wright Stuff airplane doesn't seem right to me. The smallest pieces of wood on my model are the wing and stab ribs, which are 1/16" square and about 5.5 lb/ft^3 density. Before I switched to carbon spars, my spars were all 1/16" high by 1/8" thick (cut from 1/16" sheet...
by Less_Incidence
December 4th, 2015, 6:10 pm
Forum: Wright Stuff C
Topic: Wing Types
Replies: 7
Views: 1462

Re: Wing Types

I agree with Jeff above and I highly recommend building a built-up wing (as in framed/covered). Built-up wings are also much easier to construct and require zero sanding unless you feel like rounding off your leading and trailing edges. Flat-plate wings can be strong, but a built-up wing like I am u...

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