Anatomy B/C

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Bennett
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Re: Anatomy B/C

Postby Bennett » January 18th, 2012, 8:27 am

Since The rules allow you only to have 1 sheet of front and back notes do you think it would be worth it to put a diagram on it even though it takes up a lot of space?
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Re: Anatomy B/C

Postby SciBomb97 » January 18th, 2012, 9:04 am

so does this mean that if I put this into a proportional concept (setting the percentage of that gas in the atmosphere over 100, and opposite side of the equation with the atmosphere pressure under x), i did it correctly?
Yes, that would be correct.
You should search Boyle's law on Google for a good explanation. It's also something you should know.
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Re: Anatomy B/C

Postby foreverphysics » January 18th, 2012, 11:18 am

Since The rules allow you only to have 1 sheet of front and back notes do you think it would be worth it to put a diagram on it even though it takes up a lot of space?
If you need it, yes. If not, no.
so does this mean that if I put this into a proportional concept (setting the percentage of that gas in the atmosphere over 100, and opposite side of the equation with the atmosphere pressure under x), i did it correctly?
Yes, that would be correct.
You should search Boyle's law on Google for a good explanation. It's also something you should know.
This law is also called the law of partial pressures, or Dalton's Law.
SciBomb, Boyle's Law doesn't explain partial pressure. It only shows why it works.
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Re: Anatomy B/C

Postby Kokonilly » January 18th, 2012, 12:03 pm

Since The rules allow you only to have 1 sheet of front and back notes do you think it would be worth it to put a diagram on it even though it takes up a lot of space?
What forever said, but you can definitely cram multiple diagrams and a ton of text into one sheet of paper (I speak from experience). That's a lot of space.

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Re: Anatomy B/C

Postby SciBomb97 » January 18th, 2012, 1:04 pm

This law is also called the law of partial pressures, or Dalton's Law.
SciBomb, Boyle's Law doesn't explain partial pressure. It only shows why it works.
Oops, I meant Dalton's law. :oops:
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Re: Anatomy B/C

Postby kappakun » January 23rd, 2012, 10:15 am

What is the first structure of the respiratory tree to lack smooth muscle?
I know the upper bronchioles have smooth muscle, but what about the terminary bronchioles? Or respiratory bronchioles?

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Re: Anatomy B/C

Postby foreverphysics » January 23rd, 2012, 12:34 pm

It's cartilage from the trachea down to the bronchi. Anything down from that is smooth muscle.
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Re: Anatomy B/C

Postby kappakun » January 23rd, 2012, 1:14 pm

Hmm.. the terminal bronchioles signify the end of the conducting zone, while the respiratory zone start with respiratory bronchioles. Somewhere during the transition between bronchioles and the alveoli, there is no more smooth muscle. Since the respiratory zone is the start of gas exchange, I think it would make sense for the respiratory bronchiole to not have smooth muscle anymore, although I am not sure about this. What do you guys think?

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Re: Anatomy B/C

Postby SciBomb97 » January 23rd, 2012, 3:19 pm

Actually, all portions of the bronchial tree have smooth muscle. The larger bronchi have incomplete rings of cartilage outside the smooth muscle ring, and and smallest bronchi have irregularly spaced plates of cartilage on the outside of the muscle. After that (that is, from the bronchioles down) the airways are made up entirely of a thicker ring of smooth muscle because the muscle along can hold open the airways due to the small diameter of the airways. The smooth muscle disappears in the alveoli, where the walls become completely epithelial cells.
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They say that a smile can light up somebody's day
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Re: Anatomy B/C

Postby liutony66 » January 27th, 2012, 2:17 pm

Lastly, the parts of the brain which control different processes may be on the test, but that's also something you may want to put on the cheat sheet.
Just a clarification, which part of the brain controls different processes? I know that because respiration and digestion are largely automatic functions they are controled by the medulla oblongota, but is there any other things that we should know about that?


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