Astronomy C

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yousmellchinese123
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Re: Astronomy C

Post by yousmellchinese123 » February 24th, 2012, 8:15 am

AlphaTauri wrote:Are you getting 3.48 E7 ly (1.07 E7 pc)?

RandomPerson and I both tried the question independently and both of us got the answer above - I'd say key is wrong, unless all three of us are doing the same thing wrong and not realizing it.

I did try extremes (using the peaks and troughs for app. mag., and using 20 for the period since it appears to be a little less than 25 days), but none of those alterations make the actual answer agree with the key.
Yes I did, thank you. I was getting frustrated for a while there.

Bookluvr: There are links out there that explain how to calculate the distance. Searching "Cepheid Variable Star Distance Measurement" or something of the sort is a good starting point! (:
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Re: Astronomy C

Post by bookluvr-yoyo39 » February 24th, 2012, 8:38 am

thank you! the links i found helped! but, how did you find the absolute magnitude from the light curve? or is it a given variable in the equation?
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Re: Astronomy C

Post by yousmellchinese123 » February 24th, 2012, 8:42 am

bookluvr-yoyo39 wrote:thank you! the links i found helped! but, how did you find the absolute magnitude from the light curve? or is it a given variable in the equation?
There is a relationship that you need to find using this: http://outreach.atnf.csiro.au/education ... tions.html
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Re: Astronomy C

Post by pjgscioisamazing » February 24th, 2012, 7:03 pm

yousmellchinese123 wrote:
bookluvr-yoyo39 wrote:thank you! the links i found helped! but, how did you find the absolute magnitude from the light curve? or is it a given variable in the equation?
There is a relationship that you need to find using this: http://outreach.atnf.csiro.au/education ... tions.html
Also for Cepheids (Type I Classical Cepheids that is) there is an equation using the period to find the Absolute Magnitude:

M=-2.81log(P)-1.43

For an RR Lyrae Variable, the Absolute Magnitude is always around +.75, and for Type Ia Supernovae it is always around -19.5
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Re: Astronomy C

Post by EastStroudsburg13 » February 25th, 2012, 9:52 am

Hmm, I've always used -19.3 for Type Ia supernovae. I've seen -19.3, -19.5, and -19.6, and it does sometimes affect the results. When they don't provide a constant to use, I just go with -19.3, but how exactly are participants supposed to know which value to use?
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Re: Astronomy C

Post by Infinity Flat » February 25th, 2012, 11:04 am

EASTstroudsburg13 wrote:Hmm, I've always used -19.3 for Type Ia supernovae. I've seen -19.3, -19.5, and -19.6, and it does sometimes affect the results. When they don't provide a constant to use, I just go with -19.3, but how exactly are participants supposed to know which value to use?
It's probably best to use -19.3, unless otherwise stated in the problem.
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Re: Astronomy C

Post by pjgscioisamazing » February 25th, 2012, 11:08 am

Infinity Flat wrote:
EASTstroudsburg13 wrote:Hmm, I've always used -19.3 for Type Ia supernovae. I've seen -19.3, -19.5, and -19.6, and it does sometimes affect the results. When they don't provide a constant to use, I just go with -19.3, but how exactly are participants supposed to know which value to use?
It's probably best to use -19.3, unless otherwise stated in the problem.
According to the National Powerpoint from the Summer Coaches Institute says -19.5, so I've been using that one since I saw the powerpoint. So unless the test says something else, I usually use -19.5
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Re: Astronomy C

Post by Osennecho » February 28th, 2012, 1:47 pm

Anyone have a recommendation for the Carina Nebulae pics as there are like 100 different ones. Whenever I don't recognize one at this point or think I have the image in the 3-5ish I saved for DSO I have just been putting Carina Nebulae if it resembles it in anyway...
Last edited by Osennecho on February 29th, 2012, 5:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Astronomy C

Post by Swag » February 29th, 2012, 3:29 pm

Okay, comp is pretty soon and I'm still kinda shaky. I mean I've done a lot of research, but like what exactly should I know about type 1a supernova? And as for the known DSO's, what should I know about them?

Please & Thank you :)
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Re: Astronomy C

Post by Osennecho » February 29th, 2012, 5:26 pm

Swag wrote:Okay, comp is pretty soon and I'm still kinda shaky. I mean I've done a lot of research, but like what exactly should I know about type 1a supernova? And as for the known DSO's, what should I know about them?

Please & Thank you :)
As is always the answer for Science Olympiad. Know all the information :o
No, but seriously you can be asked anything and everything related to the DSO's or Stellar Ev let alone 1a supernova.
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