Meteorology B

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Re: Meteorology B

Post by tornado guy » April 5th, 2012, 3:37 pm

Is the eccentricity of a circle 0 or 1? I have seen conflicting answers..
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Re: Meteorology B

Post by AlphaTauri » April 5th, 2012, 5:29 pm

...I'm not sure how that's exactly related to Meteorology, but the eccentricity of a circle is 0. The more elliptical it gets (i.e. longer and skinnier), the higher the eccentricity gets until it becomes a parabola, which has an eccentricity of 1.
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Re: Meteorology B

Post by SirBobo » April 5th, 2012, 5:33 pm

AlphaTauri wrote:...I'm not sure how that's exactly related to Meteorology, but the eccentricity of a circle is 0. The more elliptical it gets (i.e. longer and skinnier), the higher the eccentricity gets until it becomes a parabola, which has an eccentricity of 1.
Eccentricity is part of the Milankovitch Cycle, which we have to know.
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Re: Meteorology B

Post by tornado guy » April 5th, 2012, 9:02 pm

AlphaTauri wrote:...I'm not sure how that's exactly related to Meteorology, but the eccentricity of a circle is 0. The more elliptical it gets (i.e. longer and skinnier), the higher the eccentricity gets until it becomes a parabola, which has an eccentricity of 1.
Oh wow, all these tests say that the eccentricity of a perfect circle is one... :|
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Re: Meteorology B

Post by ReBobville » April 6th, 2012, 11:48 am

Come on test makers!!!
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Re: Meteorology B

Post by tornado guy » April 25th, 2012, 4:13 pm

On the Virgina regional test in the wiki...
The best conditions for snow and ice build-up over time (conditions leading to glaciations or iceages)
are:
(warm/cold/wet/dry means ‘more than normal for that season’)
a) Warm summer and cold winters
b) Cool/dry summer and Warm/wet winters
c) Cold/wet winters and cool/wet summers
d) Dry/warm summers and wet/cold winters

I would think C, but the answer says B.. How is that?
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Re: Meteorology B

Post by ReBobville » April 25th, 2012, 7:05 pm

tornado guy wrote:On the Virgina regional test in the wiki...
The best conditions for snow and ice build-up over time (conditions leading to glaciations or iceages)
are:
(warm/cold/wet/dry means ‘more than normal for that season’)
a) Warm summer and cold winters
b) Cool/dry summer and Warm/wet winters
c) Cold/wet winters and cool/wet summers
d) Dry/warm summers and wet/cold winters

I would think C, but the answer says B.. How is that?
Warm winters are good for ice buildup??????? I totally agree with you tornado guy, I would have picked C too.
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Re: Meteorology B

Post by crazykik » May 8th, 2012, 4:41 pm

I really don't get this solution... I would have also picked C.

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Re: Meteorology B

Post by havenbro » May 8th, 2012, 4:58 pm

tornado guy wrote:On the Virgina regional test in the wiki...
The best conditions for snow and ice build-up over time (conditions leading to glaciations or iceages)
are:
(warm/cold/wet/dry means ‘more than normal for that season’)
a) Warm summer and cold winters
b) Cool/dry summer and Warm/wet winters
c) Cold/wet winters and cool/wet summers
d) Dry/warm summers and wet/cold winters

I would think C, but the answer says B.. How is that?
Perhaps the warm and wet winters allow for a moderate amount of snow and ice to accumulate, and the cool and dry summers keep it frozen for a longer period of time. Rain will often break up a layer of snow, and some snow might stay frozen at higher altitudes the entire winter given the summer is cool enough.
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Re: Meteorology B

Post by crazykik » May 9th, 2012, 4:44 pm

That makes sense.

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