Food Science B

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hrhdeanne
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Re: Food Science B

Post by hrhdeanne » January 8th, 2012, 9:28 am

I'm a new S.O. coach, lifetime cook, but was baffled about how to prepare my kids. We had our first competition yesterday & did poorly.TODAY I found this wiki & board and it's been helpful!

Where might one acquire lab materials for the types of tests covered here? Other than a paper bag -- I can get that. I'll definitely be looking at how to make a homemade viscosity testing device.

What are other coaches doing to prepare their kids? I've told mine that they should choose a simple baking recipe, and make it over and over, either omitting or replacing an ingredient each time (after doing it once properly to serve as the control). None of them did it, but one of the tests they had to do yesterday was look at a plate of cupcakes, identify the control, and identify the ingredient missing from the others.

Thanks for any help!

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Re: Food Science B

Post by Skink » January 8th, 2012, 11:58 am

Alright, by request I've reformatted this post.
hrhdeanne wrote:I'm a lifetime cook
That's very important. Having a knowledge base saves you the trouble of having to learn the material along with them.
hrhdeanne wrote:We had our first competition yesterday & did poorly
What did they do poorly with? After every competition, you must must must ask the kids how they felt it went and what they remember being tested on. If there was something they didn't know about, identify that and have them study it later. What I will qualify that with, though, is, since there are hundreds of supervisors nationwide, they tests will vary from competition to competition. There could be some tests that stick to the basics on the National site, and there could be others that deviate and have some more offbeat questions. They can do that as long as it's within the scope of the rules.

That said, the best way to prepare your kids is, yes, to read the wiki and board here. For this event, it isn't the most helpful resource, though. This topic doesn't get as much activity relative to others since it's a B event, and the wiki is incomplete for the same reason. Head on over to the National SO Food Science page and download the PowerPoint. It's fairly comprehensive and definitely a good start. Supervisors are sure to reference some of the information and activities in there. After that, read section 3c in the rules. These are the topics that they can be tested on. It's up to you to what extent you will teach each of them. Then, it's worth reading the sample activities in section 5 to get a general idea what to expect at competition. After that, you should get them into the kitchen and do some baking, if that’s a possibility.
hrhdeanne wrote:Where might one acquire lab materials for the types of tests covered here
You have a few options, none of which are easy. You could not practice with these tests at all and only tell them what they should know, maybe accompanied by a Youtube video or something. There's quite a bit out there. Or, you can order the reagents from a chemical supply store. You may be able to get the chemicals that go into the mixtures at a high school if you have connections. Maybe you know a chemist or someone else with access?
hrhdeanne wrote:I'll definitely be looking at how to make a homemade viscosity testing device
Feel free to come back if you have trouble with this. And it just occurred to me when I reformatted this post that if you don’t have that yet, that’s one source of the kids’ loss of points at their last competition. See 3b in the rules.
hrhdeanne wrote:I've told mine that they should choose a simple baking recipe, and make it over and over, either omitting or replacing an ingredient each time (after doing it once properly to serve as the control). None of them did it
You told them they should do something, and they didn’t do it. Hmm. One reason could be that it’s a hassle for one person to do by him/herself; you should really plan a Food Science day or something where you can marathon some baking together. You definitely should assign them single recipes—not a whole slew of them—for homework every so often, though.
hrhdeanne wrote: but one of the tests they had to do yesterday was look at plate of cupcakes, identify the control, and identify the ingredient missing from the others.
And this is why baking experience is important. They need to do those variations and use their senses to analyze the cupcake and determine how different manipulations affect its texture, consistency, taste, smell, looks, shape, and etc. Again, I would do this at practice if you can because it’s unrealistic to expect them to do this on their own at home.
Hope it helps.
Last edited by Skink on January 8th, 2012, 1:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Food Science B

Post by chalker » January 8th, 2012, 12:45 pm

Skink wrote:
hrhdeanne wrote:I'm a new S.O. coach, lifetime cook ......
Thanks for any help!
Skink, you might want to edit your post for better readability. Use quote tags instead of bold tags.

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Re: Food Science B

Post by geminicross » January 8th, 2012, 2:41 pm

I have just gotten put on this event (I had a schedule clash) , a month before the competition (regionals). What portions of the event are weighted more heavily?

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Re: Food Science B

Post by Skink » January 8th, 2012, 3:48 pm

The food part. First, get a copy of the rules and read through them yourself. There is a scoring section in there. That section doesn't specify and weights on certain sections. You could say the test is 100%. One part of the test must utilize your homemade viscosity tester, though. If you come prepared with that, it is easy points.

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Re: Food Science B

Post by hrhdeanne » January 9th, 2012, 1:19 pm

Thanks, Skink! I don't know why I didn't think of inviting the kids to my house for a day of baking -- it would be VERY helpful for them. I hadn't seen the powerpoint, either. I guess I looked back in Sept, didn't see anything, and didn't re-visit the site. I do like showing the kids that I like learning new things, too!

Thanks again!

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Re: Food Science B

Post by Lovetobake » January 10th, 2012, 10:21 am

If the power point from the 2012 is to be used, how did Linda Wozniewski get 75 sec for 7000cP Honey, not to mention 40 sec. for Hershey syrup with a cP of 1000. A 16 penny nail does not make a hole large enough for 25 ml of chocolate syrup to flow for 40 sec. Also, a previous graph from National 2008 Chemistry CD using 25 ml of fluids has totally different times for the same liquids.
http://physics.info/viscosity/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viscosity

http://www.research-equipment.com/visco ... chart.html

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Re: Food Science B

Post by wynne » January 13th, 2012, 5:47 am

We would appreciate advice as to how to make a successful viscometer and develop
a scientific testing method to go along with it. We tried using a plastic cup
with a hole made with a 16 penny nail; the hole was so small some of the more
viscous fluids did not flow at all. We switched to 8 oz Styrofoam cups and made
slightly larger holes, now the fluids flow but we am not sure how much to use or
indeed how to measure the fluids for testing. The cups we are using have ridges inside, we used one
of those as a marker, about 80ml, we am not sure if we will get a
sample that large at a competition. We don't think you can measure using a beaker as the
fluids are so sticky you would not get it all to pour into the viscometer. I
suppose you could coat the beaker with a baking release spray before you pour in
the fluid but that might alter the viscosity.


Is anyone using a ring stand as support fir their viscometer? We would like to as it
would ensure a constant height and stop the 'jiggling' that comes with holding the cup.

All comments and advice welcome.

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Re: Food Science B

Post by Arrowwolf » January 16th, 2012, 2:39 pm

My partner and I are having a difficult time researching. I don't know where to start, suggestions?
Events: Write It Do It, Disease Detectives, Mission Possible, Food Science. Quote~ Friend: What Happened? Me: Dumb Sidewalk. Friend: How can a sidewalk be dumb? Me: IT TRIED TO CATCH ME WHEN I FELL!~ and all of this happened at regionals this year.

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Re: Food Science B

Post by chalker » January 16th, 2012, 4:19 pm

Lovetobake wrote:If the power point from the 2012 is to be used, how did Linda Wozniewski get 75 sec for 7000cP Honey, not to mention 40 sec. for Hershey syrup with a cP of 1000. A 16 penny nail does not make a hole large enough for 25 ml of chocolate syrup to flow for 40 sec. Also, a previous graph from National 2008 Chemistry CD using 25 ml of fluids has totally different times for the same liquids.
http://physics.info/viscosity/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viscosity

http://www.research-equipment.com/visco ... chart.html

Part of the problem might be the 'penny size' only refers to the LENGTH of the nail, not the diameter (see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nail_%28fa ... enny_sizes ). I'll see if I can get clarification from Linda about the size of the nail and have it posted.

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