Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C

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Re: Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C

Post by wjnewhouse » February 12th, 2013, 8:52 pm

iwonder wrote:But wouldn't you need to know the resistance of R3 to use the standard method like what you mention, chalker?
You are given the R_3 resistance value


Chalker, I understand what you saying , because you can basically can find R_x with R_3 by only taking 2 voltages and using ohms law twice, but as iwonder said that method defeats the purpose the wheatstone bridge :/ .

One could do that process with R_1 and the Potentiometer, then you could find the potentiometer's resistance, then calculate R_x. At least that way you use the Potentiometer's resistance to find R_x.
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Re: Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C

Post by tangentline » February 12th, 2013, 9:03 pm

chalker wrote:
tangentline wrote:I'm not technically sure if you can measure the current of that circuit... Without taking it apart...

Was there a way to determine the resistance of the potentiometer such as a maximum and a minimum resistance? Then you can do your circuit analysis techniques :)
Or I'd do voltage division if that thing in the middle wasn't there.

You technically can measure current in wires without disconnecting them with a clamp-on ammeters, but that's not needed here. Using the voltage across R3, and the known resistance of R3, you can calculate the current through Rx (assuming you've adjusted the potentiometer to make Gx read 0 current). Check out the wikipedia page for more details: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheatstone_bridge
Certainly works! Yet another one of those questions that have been at science olympiad when it seems like there is absolutely no way to measure what you need to get an answer but there is another way around. I wasn't sure if a meter was supposed to be stuck in the middle of the diamond or if it was elsewhere when measuring.

-->The potentiometer is likely the distraction :)

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Re: Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C

Post by iwonder » February 12th, 2013, 9:31 pm

I meant R2, for the record :D I didn't look at the diagram again...

But that's a moot point since chalker's method works fine(now that I look at the picture)
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Re: Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C

Post by 2017Kortman » February 13th, 2013, 5:01 pm

I would like to know some things that usually appear on the tests. Please? :(
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Re: Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C

Post by geminicross » February 13th, 2013, 5:14 pm

This "might" be what you're looking for http://scioly.org/wiki/index.php/2013_T ... hock_Value

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Re: Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C

Post by sciencepenguin9 » February 14th, 2013, 6:32 pm

Does anyone know where I can find the powerpoint for Shock Value from 2011? It was really really good, and I can't find it...Or if anyone has it saved and could email it to me, that would be great

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Re: Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C

Post by asquaredplusb » February 14th, 2013, 8:46 pm

You'd have to be a bit more specific than that, sorry. ;)

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Re: Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C

Post by Bozongle » February 16th, 2013, 6:57 pm

Hey gemini, just saw your signature, congrats on the third in Shock Value! Hopefully some of my advice helped you ;)

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Re: Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C

Post by Bozongle » February 25th, 2013, 6:07 pm

Does anyone know the different types of circuit materials/boards used for hands-on at competition?
I wanted to know possible things I can study to know how to use at state.

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Re: Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C

Post by chalker » February 26th, 2013, 8:00 am

Bozongle wrote:Does anyone know the different types of circuit materials/boards used for hands-on at competition?
I wanted to know possible things I can study to know how to use at state.

There are countless possibilities. It's going to be entirely up to the individual event supervisor regarding what materials are used.

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