Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C

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EthanBrown
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Re: Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C

Post by EthanBrown » February 26th, 2013, 2:47 pm

I would suggest bringing a volt meter of your own to anyone going to competition. First of all, you will probably be more familiar with it, and also you wont run the risk of loosing the event due to their volt meter. (from personal experience.)
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Re: Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C

Post by PicturePerfect » February 26th, 2013, 7:48 pm

What are some equations I should now? I'm new to Shock.
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Re: Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C

Post by Skink » February 26th, 2013, 8:54 pm

PicturePerfect wrote:What are some equations I should now? I'm new to Shock.
Ohm's law and different rearrangements of it is huge. The power equations can't hurt. Know how to find the equivalent resistance of both series and parallel circuits; those are simple enough equations to use but disastrous if you mistake one for the other. It's probably also a good idea to have an idea where your derived units come from. In other words, what is a volt? While I'm on the topic, know how to deal with the basic metric conversions related to kiliohms and milliamps since they're not the base units. This throws teams off at times.

Re: magnetism, your guess is as good as mine. I don't know of any equations on topic that aren't beyond the scope of this event, but maybe someone else has an idea. Thing is, this part isn't in C, so there may not be many folks here to weigh in on this one.

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Re: Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C

Post by rbgking13 » February 28th, 2013, 9:07 am

Do i need to bring a volt meter or any of those kinds of divices? its my first time and i really scared, its in about3-4 weeks. HELP! :oops: :geek: :cry:

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Re: Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C

Post by rbgking13 » February 28th, 2013, 9:08 am

PicturePerfect wrote:What are some equations I should now? I'm new to Shock.
Me too, HELP! can you try to dumb it down for me, i may be a nerd, but im not a shock value genius :lol:

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Re: Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C

Post by fourLoko » February 28th, 2013, 9:14 am

rbgking13 wrote:
PicturePerfect wrote:What are some equations I should now? I'm new to Shock.
Me too, HELP! can you try to dumb it down for me, i may be a nerd, but im not a shock value genius :lol:
Ohm's Law, and P=IV - you should be able to derive an equation for any quantity you need given an 2 variables out of P, I, V and R.
Resistors and Capacitors in parallel and series.
Kirchoff's Laws might be useful, but I don't think they're required for Shock. I think there's more magnetism equations you need too, so you should look into that.
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Re: Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C

Post by Bozongle » February 28th, 2013, 9:40 am

Also, try to learn finding voltage, and current separately for different resistors in parallel and series. That's what confuses me the most, so many different rules!

Also, R= pL/A doesn't hurt either.

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Re: Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C

Post by siciscio » February 28th, 2013, 2:10 pm

rbgking13 wrote:Do i need to bring a volt meter or any of those kinds of divices? its my first time and i really scared, its in about3-4 weeks. HELP! :oops: :geek: :cry:
No, if anything,the supervisor will provide it for you. Besides theres also a probability that you wont be given a voltmeter to work with. You should look up videos on Voltmeters,.. multimeters just to get a gist of how they work.

As for devices, I'm not sure if you meant Voltmeters, Multimeters, Ampmeters etc.., But If you have the time and hopefully the material. I think you should work with actual circuits. Try building a circuit with a light bulb, battery and a switch, one with 2 light bulbs, one light bulb on and one light bulb off.. Also a nice habit to get into as your building the circuits, is thinking about all the equations apply to it. Like how much power is the light bulb producing? How much current is running through the light bulbs? How can I make one light up brighter, and the other weaker? Just some stuff to consider.

Good luck :D
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Re: Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C

Post by sciolyperson » February 28th, 2013, 3:53 pm

I ran into this problem at county:
You have a multimeter, a 1.5 volt battery, a 1 microfarad capacitor, and wire.
You need to find the internal resistance of the multimeter.
How would you do it? I am having some trouble figuring it out.
(People in Shock Value will probably not know what this is, they shouldn't need to.)
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Re: Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C

Post by tangentline » February 28th, 2013, 11:22 pm

sciolyperson wrote:I ran into this problem at county:
You have a multimeter, a 1.5 volt battery, a 1 microfarad capacitor, and wire.
You need to find the internal resistance of the multimeter.
How would you do it? I am having some trouble figuring it out.
(People in Shock Value will probably not know what this is, they shouldn't need to.)
I say charge the capacitor up by connecting it to the battery (should be very quick), then connect the multimeter to the capacitor--teehee, doing this is really fun to watch--(to whatever voltage range required because the internal resistance varies) and find a time constant for the circuit and you know, work it out.
I would go for 1 time constant of discharging from the 1.5 volt of measuring the time, you can do the calculations for that :)

And for equations of this event... Definitely Kirchhoff even for Shock Value (I'm putting this out to my opponents)--it's capabilities of what you can do with it is often neglected...

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