Water Quality B/C

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Re: Water Quality B/C

Postby Azismith » March 29th, 2013, 2:17 pm

What happens when you factor aquatic life into the picture? As the temperature of the pond increases, wouldn't the metabolic rate, and thus the respiration of the organisms in the pond increase? This would create more carbon dioxide, which would react with the water to form carbonic acid (I believe that it is carbonic). But, as the temp. increases, the pond can hold fewer gases (is this right?), so the CO2 would escape from the pond w/out acidifying it. Or, the plants in the pond would convert this to DO, which wouldn't affect the pH (at least not directly). So, would the temperature/pH relationship acidify at first, then level out? Or is that completely the wrong chain of thought? Thank you!

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Re: Water Quality B/C

Postby caseyotis » March 29th, 2013, 9:28 pm

Azismith wrote:What happens when you factor aquatic life into the picture? As the temperature of the pond increases, wouldn't the metabolic rate, and thus the respiration of the organisms in the pond increase? This would create more carbon dioxide, which would react with the water to form carbonic acid (I believe that it is carbonic). But, as the temp. increases, the pond can hold fewer gases (is this right?), so the CO2 would escape from the pond w/out acidifying it. Or, the plants in the pond would convert this to DO, which wouldn't affect the pH (at least not directly). So, would the temperature/pH relationship acidify at first, then level out? Or is that completely the wrong chain of thought? Thank you!


I... I have no idea. But I am fairly certain that you shouldn't go into that much detail, especially in Div. B! :lol:
I believe the acidification is minimal and not very important, but you can research more online. It's all too complicated for me.
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Re: Water Quality B/C

Postby silentsage » April 2nd, 2013, 1:28 pm

From what I've found, and a test I took, I thought that pH naturally decreases with time during the day because organisms undergoing photosynthesis released CO2, an acid, thereby lowering pH, which rises back up overnight. The temperature of water should not affect the amount of dissolved gases because 1) The solubility of water will not change so significantly with temperature (we're not exceeding habitable temperatures, are we?) and 2) I would be very surprised if the water was completely saturated with CO2. There can be more DO than water in some cases (above 110% is unhealthy), so I do not believe that this would be an issue.
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Re: Water Quality B/C

Postby ScienceOlympian » April 2nd, 2013, 7:36 pm

Which part, in your opinion, is the most important? (Part One, Two, or Three?)
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Re: Water Quality B/C

Postby Azismith » April 2nd, 2013, 7:39 pm

Thank you!!
One thing though, even in the 'habitable' temperatures, I believe that the DO is affected quite a bit by temperature. I tried looking up 'temperature dissolved oxygen graph' on google pictures and was really surprised at how much temp. affected DO.
In addition, isn't it the organisms that 'respirate' (fish, etc.) that exhale the CO2, which then reacts with water to form carbonic acid?
Also, another question: In what sort of scenario can water be 110% saturated? I have also found that it can happen, but I don't quite understand how.

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Re: Water Quality B/C

Postby Epicness101 » April 3rd, 2013, 3:38 pm

Somebody correct me if i'm wrong.

The current scenario you're describing goes something along the lines of supersaturation. One possible scenario is, well, beer. Under the high pressures inside the beer bottle, the carbon dioxide gas is easily dissolved by the water. At atmospheric pressures, such as when the beer bottle is opened, the solubility of the beer is lower, leading to the beer becoming supersaturated.

Another example. quite simply, is a cloud in an area/volume of water vapor
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Re: Water Quality B/C

Postby caseyotis » April 3rd, 2013, 4:56 pm

A very common question on tests is how temperature affects DO, so it's important to know whether cold or hot water holds more oxygen.
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Re: Water Quality B/C

Postby FueL » April 4th, 2013, 11:38 am

As far as I know, there's no simple relationship between temperature and pH. Much more important is daily variation in pH, which silentsage explained (CO2 dissolves in water to form carbonic acid, so photosynthesis, a process which removes carbon dioxide and only occurs during the day, would decrease a lake's pH while respiration increases it).

The relationship between dissolved oxygen and temperature (the warmer the water is, the less oxygen it can hold) is really important to aquatic life, which can only survive if sufficient DO is present, and does seem to be a favorite test question.

The most important section of the event to study, imo, is part one. If I were studying I'd probably devote 60% of my time to part one, 30% to part three, and 10% to part two (because the ID isn't too challenging and you only need to know basic facts about the invasives).
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Re: Water Quality B/C

Postby Epicness101 » April 4th, 2013, 12:48 pm

Personally, I devote more of my time to part 3, simply because it's so hard for me to comprehend. That's just my opinion, at any rate.
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Re: Water Quality B/C

Postby yogoperson » April 4th, 2013, 2:08 pm

Hey you guys, how much ecology do you guys say would be good study for this event? I feel like basic ecology isn't helping me all to much. Maybe just estuary and freshwater ecology?
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Re: Water Quality B/C

Postby Cjkowalcz » April 4th, 2013, 3:55 pm

yogoperson wrote:Hey you guys, how much ecology do you guys say would be good study for this event? I feel like basic ecology isn't helping me all to much. Maybe just estuary and freshwater ecology?


I dont know if div. B is similar to c, but our test focused more on freshwater. We had NO questions about estuaries. But, we still knew about them, and every test is different. So, i would just recommend putting stuff in your notes and learning as much about both as you can. Good Luck :D
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Re: Water Quality B/C

Postby yogoperson » April 4th, 2013, 4:00 pm

Cjkowalcz wrote:
yogoperson wrote:Hey you guys, how much ecology do you guys say would be good study for this event? I feel like basic ecology isn't helping me all to much. Maybe just estuary and freshwater ecology?


I dont know if div. B is similar to c, but our test focused more on freshwater. We had NO questions about estuaries. But, we still knew about them, and every test is different. So, i would just recommend putting stuff in your notes and learning as much about both as you can. Good Luck :D


Thank you. ^^
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Re: Water Quality B/C

Postby FueL » April 4th, 2013, 4:08 pm

Basic ecology is necessary as a foundation for aquatic ecology, which you should be focusing on. Estuaries were just added this year and I've also found that they don't come up on tests often. If anything they'd be part of an ecology question, rather than water quality.
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Re: Water Quality B/C

Postby science_geek112 » April 6th, 2013, 1:00 pm

What are things we need to study for for this event? Certain animals we should know? What terms should we know?

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Re: Water Quality B/C

Postby caseyotis » April 6th, 2013, 1:33 pm

science_geek112 wrote:What are things we need to study for for this event? Certain animals we should know? What terms should we know?


You should be able to differentiate between every macroinvertebrate (larva and nymphs) and their class. This is good info for a cheat sheet though, because it's hard if you aren't proficient at sheer memorization.
You have to know WQI (Water Quality Index) pretty well, and know the categories (DO, BOD, nitrates, phosphates, turbidity, etc.).
Erm... What else. Practice tests are very useful because they tend to repeat questions (such as the famous "What is the relationship between temperature and dissolved oxygen in water?").
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