Remote Sensing C

cngu23
Member
Member
Posts: 248
Joined: March 12th, 2011, 4:57 pm
Division: C
State: MD
Location: Maryland
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 1 time

Re: Remote Sensing C

Post by cngu23 » October 11th, 2012, 7:36 pm

JSGandora wrote:Hm, my friend who did that test said it was from the Test Exchange. Looking at the history I cannot find any activity of it being removed. There are two questions that I cannot find the answer to. Could someone post the answer to these (not numbered the same as in the test itself)?

1. The best satellite for isolating chlorophyll absoption would be:
A Spot
B Landsat MSS
C GOES
D Landsat TM

2. A plane flying at 12,000 feet has two cameras, both cameras have the same focal length, one camera uses a 35 mm film size and the other uses a 240 mm film size. How would this affect the ground area recorded by the camera? A diagram would help. 2 pts
I believe the first one is Landsat TM

Not sure about the second one, but this may help http://cameras.about.com/od/commoncamer ... lained.htm
Marriotts Ridge 11-
Walter Johnson 09-11

13 MD Regional/State
Material S (2/-) TPS (-/2)
12 MD Regional/State
Remote S(2/6) Water Q(2/4) Optics (-/5)
11 MD Regional
Remote S(2) Eco(2) D Planet(3)

JSGandora
Member
Member
Posts: 613
Joined: December 25th, 2010, 12:09 pm
Division: C
State: NJ
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 0

Re: Remote Sensing C

Post by JSGandora » October 11th, 2012, 7:42 pm

Thanks, is there a specific reason you chose Landsat MSS (assuming you meant MSS rather than TM)?

Additionally, would this just be a difference in area recorded? The 35 mm film size would record less ground area than the 240 mm film size? It should a little simple though.

User avatar
TheWrightBrother
Member
Member
Posts: 8
Joined: September 22nd, 2009, 5:24 am
Division: C
State: KS
Location: Shawnee, Kansas
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 0

What To Expect

Post by TheWrightBrother » October 25th, 2012, 3:18 pm

I'm a frosh and new to remote sensing. I was wondering what I should expect in terms of what atmospheric and hydrological features I need to identify, and what kinds of images and diagrams I should pepare to interpret.
Southland Invitational 2012:
6th Reach for the Stars
Pembroke Invitational 2012:
5th Reach for the Stars
Regionals 2012:
2nd Reach for the Stars
6th Meteorology
State 2012:
1st Meteorology
---------- Peace Out :geek:

User avatar
EastStroudsburg13
Admin Emeritus
Admin Emeritus
Posts: 3166
Joined: January 17th, 2009, 7:32 am
Division: Grad
State: MD
Pronouns: He/Him/His
Location: At work trying to be a real adult
Has thanked: 30 times
Been thanked: 135 times
Contact:

Re: Remote Sensing C

Post by EastStroudsburg13 » October 25th, 2012, 6:09 pm

The images can literally be anything on the Earth. Since it's Hydrosphere, it'll usually be of oceans, shorelines, clouds, lakes, rivers, estuaries, clouds, and other features. You should be able to identify each of these in images, as well as certain characteristics that they exhibit (e.g. capes and sandbars on shorelines, dams on rivers or reservoirs, etc.)

Being able to look at an image and interpret things from it is something that some people just grasp more easily than others, so the amount you need to practice really depends on you. If you had Road Scholar in B that should help, since you'll be familiar with what landforms look like from the sky. If not, you can see if you can get a few topo maps and study them, see what features they have. I never did this personally, but it just occurred to me that you could browse around on Google Maps set on satellite or Google Earth and find things that you are already familiar with so you can see what they look like from the sky.

For practice tests, you can check the 2013 Test Exchange Wiki and the Remote Sensing Wiki. Remote can be a very fun event once you get the hang of it. Hope that helped and I didn't overload you with information. :)
East Stroudsburg South Class of 2012, Alumnus of JT Lambert, Drexel University Class of 2017

Helpful Links
Wiki
Wiki Pages that Need Work
FAQ and SciOly FAQ Wiki
Chat (See IRC Wiki for more info)
BBCode Wiki


So long, and thanks for all the Future Dictator titles!

meggers1221
Member
Member
Posts: 19
Joined: January 5th, 2012, 8:36 am
Division: C
State: IL
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 0

Re: Remote Sensing C

Post by meggers1221 » January 5th, 2013, 7:41 am

Okay i'm pretty new to remote sensing so this might sound like a bit of a dumb question, but i was doing a practice test and one of the questions was "In thermal images showing land and water in mid-latitudes during the fall, water is often seen as"
a. Light gray in the day and light gray at night
b. Light gray in the day and dark gray at night
c. Dark gray in the day and light gray at night
d. Dark gray in the day and dark gray at night

I've also seen previous questions asking me what the red in the image implied. does anyone know where i could find information on what colors imply in an image?
State Results:
2008: Food Science (1st)
2010: Compute This(1st), Science Crime Busters(2nd)

2013 Events: Materials Science, Forensics, Remote Sensing

User avatar
EastStroudsburg13
Admin Emeritus
Admin Emeritus
Posts: 3166
Joined: January 17th, 2009, 7:32 am
Division: Grad
State: MD
Pronouns: He/Him/His
Location: At work trying to be a real adult
Has thanked: 30 times
Been thanked: 135 times
Contact:

Re: Remote Sensing C

Post by EastStroudsburg13 » January 5th, 2013, 11:39 am

I'm leaning towards c, since water changes temperature more slowly than land. So during the day land will have a higher temperature than water, but at night the water will have a higher temperature than the land.

For your second question, I'm thinking red implies heat or warmth, since that's the general implication, but it depends on what purpose the image is serving. It can represent a lot of things, all anyone has to do is set a false color scheme and bam, you've got red.
East Stroudsburg South Class of 2012, Alumnus of JT Lambert, Drexel University Class of 2017

Helpful Links
Wiki
Wiki Pages that Need Work
FAQ and SciOly FAQ Wiki
Chat (See IRC Wiki for more info)
BBCode Wiki


So long, and thanks for all the Future Dictator titles!

meggers1221
Member
Member
Posts: 19
Joined: January 5th, 2012, 8:36 am
Division: C
State: IL
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 0

Re: Remote Sensing C

Post by meggers1221 » January 5th, 2013, 12:11 pm

Thanks, so to clarify colors themselves do not mean much, it depends a lot more on brightness?
State Results:
2008: Food Science (1st)
2010: Compute This(1st), Science Crime Busters(2nd)

2013 Events: Materials Science, Forensics, Remote Sensing

User avatar
zyzzyva980
Admin Emeritus
Admin Emeritus
Posts: 1539
Joined: November 18th, 2009, 12:59 pm
Division: Grad
State: IA
Location: Des Moines
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 0
Contact:

Re: Remote Sensing C

Post by zyzzyva980 » January 5th, 2013, 1:27 pm

If you're trying to identify what certain colors represent in an image (this is in regards to your second question) you first have to identify if the image is true-color or false-color. (This is usually fairly simple: Does the image look real?). If it's true color then it should be easy. If it's false color it's usually a bit trickier, but it's also simple once you understand the process used to make false-color images.

In a nutshell, the sensor collects energy at different wavelengths on the spectrum. Since some wavelengths (mostly IR) can't be seen by humans in true color, they can be assigned a color to appear in the picture (hence the term false-color, since it's not the actual color). There are a lot of reasons you might do this, but one of the more common ones is making infrared appear red. In this case, it's similar to what EAST said- this will often represent vegetation and brighter shades of red represent healthier plants.

You should also use context when interpreting images- take into account all information you've been given for the image. For a bit more on how to interpret images, look no further than here
Olathe North HS, 2011-2013 | National Runner-Up, Sounds of Music (2012)
Never lose the joy of competing in the pursuit of winning

Resources
Site Help: FAQ & IRC
Event Help: [wiki][/wiki] & Image Gallery
Social Networks: scioly.org on Facebook & Twitter

6nusher
Member
Member
Posts: 11
Joined: October 18th, 2012, 3:26 pm
Division: C
State: NY
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 0

Re: Remote Sensing C

Post by 6nusher » January 23rd, 2013, 5:30 pm

Are there any measuring tools that would be helpful to bring into competition that aren't mentioned in the rules? I think the triangle, ruler and protractor pretty much covers it all, but if anyone has any other items they would recommend, that would be helpful.

User avatar
FullMetalMaple
Exalted Member
Exalted Member
Posts: 302
Joined: February 6th, 2011, 10:39 am
Division: Grad
State: KS
Location: Universitas Dallasensis
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 0

Re: Remote Sensing C

Post by FullMetalMaple » January 23rd, 2013, 5:54 pm

The only measuring device I've ever had to use is a ruler. I believe you're also allowed a magnifying glass, which would probably be to your advantage to bring. You never know when you'll need it or anything else mentioned in the rules.

Locked

Return to “2013 Study Events”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest