Dynamic Planet B/C

syo_astro
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby syo_astro » June 21st, 2013, 11:41 am

I didn't think the test was that good. It was pretty easy, until the weird cross between geomapping and topo, that in reality had little to do with glaciers.
I haven't really done glaciers (though, I've done Dynamic a few times), but I'm wondering what you mean by the Geomaps/topo cross? To my knowledge, Dynamic can definitely have topo map questions...just not to the same extent as Geomaps or Road Scholar (which I think is a bit deeper). So, just curious?
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby Crazy Puny Man » June 21st, 2013, 1:26 pm

Well, in Division C, there were a few pages of questions that resembled Road Scholar questions. I can name a few, but I'm not sure if I'm allowed to...

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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby scio444 » June 22nd, 2013, 7:52 am

Topo is expected, but this was comparing geologic cross sections and different bedrock layers (some of which were deposited by glaciers). It was interesting, and it was only one part of the test.

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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby Crazy Puny Man » June 22nd, 2013, 8:17 am

Hm. I didn't see that part of the test. If it was on the C test, it must've been in the second 1/2-2/3 of the test...

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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby syo_astro » June 22nd, 2013, 12:57 pm

Topo is expected, but this was comparing geologic cross sections and different bedrock layers (some of which were deposited by glaciers). It was interesting, and it was only one part of the test.
Hm, that sounds like relative age dating (which does admittedly come up in Geomaps as per the rules). To be honest...I mean, at least in Div C I see Rule 4b seems to relate to that a bit.

Sorry if I'm kind of naive with never doing glaciers...but it sounds like to some extent it wasn't THAT unfair (and it seems like some other parts could be related). Either way it's done, and now you'll just study more for the future XD. As for "easy", it's all relative. Maybe I'll just go back to doing other things, but good luck for next year!
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby ScienceOlympian » July 15th, 2013, 5:46 pm

Does anyone have any tips for studying?
I already used a lot of websites, all the resources from Science Olympiad's website, and the wiki.
I don't have access to any Earth Science college or high school textbooks (I am in middle school).
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby Crazy Puny Man » July 15th, 2013, 6:07 pm

Do Road Scholar. :geek:

EDIT: for books, you could probably find some quality free e-books on glaciers. Look up some free e-book download sites

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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby BYHscioly » July 15th, 2013, 7:52 pm

If you need help with topography or satellite imagery, you could always find some random topographic maps online or go to Google Earth and look in places where there might be glaciers. Many times, you can find a lot of conventional examples, as well as some more intricate puzzles, which you can practice identifying and solving.

Also, read. Personally, I like reading online, since there are so many resources. Wikipedia is good, but only to a certain extent. There may be some other features not on Wikipedia but can be found elsewhere. Also, if you can understand the scholarly articles (theses, research, etc.), they would be great, but they are very detailed and focused so unless you're really into that particular aspect, try to stay more general. The more you read, the more you learn, and the more you cover, and you'll discover something new every day.

I'm not sure how much textbooks help, but if you can get one that focuses on glaciers, it would definitely be a really big help.
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby Crazy Puny Man » July 15th, 2013, 7:58 pm

On the issue of textbooks, I know my partner asked his dad, who was a professor at a nearby University, to borrow all the books on glaciers within the system/chain of the colleges (whatever you call it) under his name.

So if you can get some books from a college library...or any library in general, for that matter, but I think college libraries would be ideal if you have access to one

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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby mnstrviola » August 16th, 2013, 10:43 am

So I came back from Yosemite a few days ago. It was really interesting to see glacially carved troughs, but what surprised me the most was that there is a roche moutonnee in the park! It's name is the Lembert Dome. I thought they were only formed by continental glaciers, and I'm pretty sure there weren't any in California during the most recent Ice Age... does anyone have an explanation for this? Can they be formed by valley glaciers too?

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