Experimental Design B/C

Locked
magicalforest
Member
Member
Posts: 29
Joined: February 25th, 2013, 2:40 pm
Division: C
State: NJ
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 0

Re: Experimental Design B/C

Post by magicalforest » February 28th, 2014, 6:32 pm

How do you guys work collaboratively with your partners?

I think one of our problems is that we do not get along too well. We disagree on a lot of things, such as how to conduct the experiment and what variables should be involved. Or we disagree on how to approach the write-up. I feel we should add some more to the error analysis, for example, but one of my partners always feels he wrote enough. I may be wrong, or he may be wrong, but in the process there's always negative attitudes and disagreements.

And then just outside of Experimental, we just do not get along very well. One of my partners just gets annoyed at me for the littlest things.

So how do you guys work well with other people? How do you guys eliminate tension between your partners?

User avatar
ThatRoboGuy
Member
Member
Posts: 65
Joined: February 22nd, 2014, 5:51 pm
Division: C
State: OH
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 0

Re: Experimental Design B/C

Post by ThatRoboGuy » February 28th, 2014, 7:13 pm

Well...we just kinda go with it. We do a competition that's our school only at the beginning of the year, and the rest of the team knows that this is kinda the event that I kick butt at. I've got the rubric memorized...I pride myself on full points in the parts I do.... It's a respect thing, really. You all think that you are better than one another and will end up arguing about it. Sometimes, you just have to step down.

Or, you know, you could screw that entire part and use the other approach. Meet the day/week before competition, and go over EXACTLY what EACH person will do. I usually do the front page (Statement of Problem through Experimental Control), occasionally the graph and data table, and the analysis and interpretation. It actually really helps to have the plan beforehand.

I would like to add on to this. Our team got second at Regionals. Our experiment? How does the number of rocks in a plastic egg (1, 2, 3 rocks) affect the egg's ability to float in a cup of water (200 mL)?
---DO NOT over-complicate the experiment. We saw people testing momentum and gravity and inertia and pendulums...while we were floating a plastic egg in some water.---
Here to help

jwalkotten
Member
Member
Posts: 14
Joined: February 4th, 2014, 5:20 pm
Division: C
State: MI
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 0

Re: Experimental Design B/C

Post by jwalkotten » March 3rd, 2014, 3:09 pm

magicalforest wrote:How do you guys work collaboratively with your partners?

I think one of our problems is that we do not get along too well. We disagree on a lot of things, such as how to conduct the experiment and what variables should be involved. Or we disagree on how to approach the write-up. I feel we should add some more to the error analysis, for example, but one of my partners always feels he wrote enough. I may be wrong, or he may be wrong, but in the process there's always negative attitudes and disagreements.

And then just outside of Experimental, we just do not get along very well. One of my partners just gets annoyed at me for the littlest things.

So how do you guys work well with other people? How do you guys eliminate tension between your partners?
We just split up the rubric. We have one person do the first part, which is all the set up stuff, like hypothesis, statement of problem, variables, procedure and some other stuff in there. We have another person do the math part, which is gonna be your graphs, data tables, and stats, and then we have the third person do the conclusion and applications part. We split it up linearly, so the first person starts at the beginning of the rubric and works up to math, and the third person starts at math and works towards the end. If you just have each person know their own individual part and just do that part, then you take away a lot of "I think this is right" "no I think this is right" stuff. You need to just trust that everyone else knows their part, and not worry about them. Also, go with a simple experiment. Always, simpler is better.
2013 Regionals - 1st Overall, 1st Exp. Design, 3rd Anatomy, 5th Disease Detectives
2013 State - 4th Overall, 3rd Exp. Design, 3rd Disease Detectives, 5th Shock Value, 7th Anatomy

zapofdoom34
Member
Member
Posts: 13
Joined: November 30th, 2010, 2:26 pm
Division: C
State: CA
Location: Somewhere in California...
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 0

Re: Experimental Design B/C

Post by zapofdoom34 » March 3rd, 2014, 3:41 pm

What do you guys usually put for your standard of comparison?

Ours is: "The control for the experiment is ___ because the data collected from that level can be compared to the data from the other levels to determine how the independent variable affects the dependent variable."

I feel like it's not enough because it seems obvious that you would compare the data from the control to the data from the other levels. What can I add or change to improve the standard of comparison?

Mortem_Haedo
Member
Member
Posts: 20
Joined: March 2nd, 2014, 4:38 pm
Division: B
State: OH
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 0

Re: Experimental Design B/C

Post by Mortem_Haedo » March 3rd, 2014, 4:34 pm

magicalforest wrote:How do you guys work collaboratively with your partners?

I think one of our problems is that we do not get along too well. We disagree on a lot of things, such as how to conduct the experiment and what variables should be involved. Or we disagree on how to approach the write-up. I feel we should add some more to the error analysis, for example, but one of my partners always feels he wrote enough. I may be wrong, or he may be wrong, but in the process there's always negative attitudes and disagreements.

And then just outside of Experimental, we just do not get along very well. One of my partners just gets annoyed at me for the littlest things.

So how do you guys work well with other people? How do you guys eliminate tension between your partners?
For me I work with a group of two other girls and we don't have any issues since we really get along. At regionals we disagreed about the hypothesis (me vs the other two) but since it was a majority I didn't really care. If you disagree on if something is right or not just go with majority. And if you want to add/remove stuff ask them if you can (make sure you are completely done with everything else though).

In our group, we always ask each other if there is something else we can add to observations, errors, etc. and write down as much as possible. Be willing to ask for help and to receive help :D Personally I am always that person who is double checking and writing really specifically (which is great for my part; procedures, materials, etc.) but bad for quick and concise things like variables so maybe assign parts to people whose work ethics match. Hope you do well! :)

Astroknight
Member
Member
Posts: 90
Joined: February 27th, 2014, 8:57 pm
Division: C
State: TN
Location: The middle of somewhere
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 0

Re: Experimental Design B/C

Post by Astroknight » March 3rd, 2014, 8:34 pm

(removed)
Last edited by Astroknight on March 13th, 2014, 2:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.
TSA's pretty cool... i guess

2015 events:
Essays on Technology, Tech Bowl, Water Infrastructure, Website Design

Crzy
Member
Member
Posts: 1
Joined: March 4th, 2014, 4:24 pm
Division: B
State: PA
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 0

Re: Experimental Design B/C

Post by Crzy » March 5th, 2014, 1:35 pm

I'm super excited for this year! My team didn't do to well in experimental design last year, but this time I feel extra prepared! The competition is THIS WEEKEND!!! :D
A wise man once said,"Hello."

BSchiffer
Member
Member
Posts: 12
Joined: February 9th, 2014, 3:45 pm
Division: C
State: IL
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 0

Re: Experimental Design B/C

Post by BSchiffer » March 6th, 2014, 5:24 pm

I was looking through the rubric and I had some questions:

What does operationally defined mean for IV and DV?
What are three levels of IV?
What are examples of SOC?

Thanks for any help!!

User avatar
ThatRoboGuy
Member
Member
Posts: 65
Joined: February 22nd, 2014, 5:51 pm
Division: C
State: OH
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 0

Re: Experimental Design B/C

Post by ThatRoboGuy » March 6th, 2014, 5:40 pm

BSchiffer wrote: What does operationally defined mean for IV and DV?
Operationally defined means using units, in essence. For example (Bold is the operationally defined part):

IV: Ball dropped (Tennis, ping pong, basket ball)
DV: Height bounced (Cm)

BSchiffer wrote: What are three levels of IV?
The three different independent variables. In our case, the tennis ball, ping pong ball, and basket ball.

BSchiffer wrote: What are examples of SOC?
Our standard of comparison will be the tennis ball since we are doing our testing on a tennis court. The tennis ball's bounce will be unaffected by outside sources (always include that phrase as some of your reasoning) and will bounce as intended.
Here to help

BSchiffer
Member
Member
Posts: 12
Joined: February 9th, 2014, 3:45 pm
Division: C
State: IL
Has thanked: 0
Been thanked: 0

Re: Experimental Design B/C

Post by BSchiffer » March 6th, 2014, 5:49 pm

ThatRoboGuy wrote:
BSchiffer wrote: What does operationally defined mean for IV and DV?
Operationally defined means using units, in essence. For example (Bold is the operationally defined part):

IV: Ball dropped (Tennis, ping pong, basket ball)
DV: Height bounced (Cm)

BSchiffer wrote: What are three levels of IV?
The three different independent variables. In our case, the tennis ball, ping pong ball, and basket ball.

BSchiffer wrote: What are examples of SOC?
Our standard of comparison will be the tennis ball since we are doing our testing on a tennis court. The tennis ball's bounce will be unaffected by outside sources (always include that phrase as some of your reasoning) and will bounce as intended.
Thanks!
If our independent variable, is say, the mass of an object, would three levels be 1. 5g 2. 10g and 3. 20g ?

One more question, for the statistics, if we were to calculate r, the coefficient of correlation, would we calculate it for each individual IV (ie a separate r for tennis ball, pingpong ball, and basketball), or somehow calculate it for the entire data set? r is how strong the correlation of the data is, so would it make more sense to do it for individual levels or for all the data?

Locked

Return to “2014 Lab Events”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest