Metric Mastery B

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billyhoho
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Re: Metric Mastery B

Post by billyhoho » December 10th, 2013, 6:49 pm

AAHALD01 wrote:Does anybody know a really good ways to study for Metric Mastery? Also, what are some excellent resources to use to study?
Really, the only "really good way" to study for something like this is to measure everyday objects and things. Google's your best friend.
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Re: Metric Mastery B

Post by ali941 » December 12th, 2013, 6:03 pm

AAHALD01 wrote:Does anybody know a really good ways to study for Metric Mastery? Also, what are some excellent resources to use to study?
I don't mean to sound rude, but have you tried reading the thread? There's some brilliant advice here.

Best way to study is practice. Practice, practice, and when you think you can't mess up, practice some more. Grab random objects and estimate.
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Re: Metric Mastery B

Post by bob doyson » February 4th, 2014, 8:38 pm

What I did last year, was go around our school measuring and weighing objects, always estimate and then measure, we started out rocky, but got better over time. This for me was the best way to study, doing it first-handedly.
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Re: Metric Mastery B

Post by hscmom » February 5th, 2014, 6:19 am

bob doyson wrote:What I did last year, was go around our school measuring and weighing objects, always estimate and then measure, we started out rocky, but got better over time. This for me was the best way to study, doing it first-handedly.
Hit the nail on the head. Lots of practice. Really nothing else does it like practice...
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Re: Metric Mastery B

Post by JustDroobles » February 5th, 2014, 10:34 am

I wrote these tips on an answer key last year and thought it would be nice to post them publicly. I hope they are still accurate to this years rules which I have not read.
  • READ THE RULES. 50 times. Make sure you know the exact process of the event, and especially be sure you know how to take measurements to the resolution the rules require. Also, be sure to check http://www.soinc.org for official rules clarifications and FAQ’s.
  • Very important part of the rules: In the measurement portion you MUST measure to the smallest graduation or markings on the instrument plus one estimated digit. For example, on a standard ruler with millimeter markings, you must report centimeter measurements with two decimal places. If the correct answer is 9.11 cm, then 9.1 cm would be incorrect. ( 9cm + .1 + .01 estimated) If the correct answer is 9.00 cm, then 9 cm would be incorrect. ( 9cm + .0 + .00 estimated)
  • Keep in mind that the rules are very finicky for the measurement portion - you must be within 3 of the estimated digit at Regionals to receive any points, which is quite precise. If the answer is 12.01 cm and you responded with 12.05, you would receive zero points. Precision is key to this event!
  • Make sure you practice every type of measurement possible: mass, volume, density, area, force, distance, time, and temperature.
  • Learn the formulas for calculating the area and volume of many shapes and figures, including parallelograms, trapezoids, triangles, circles, rectangular prisms, spheres, cones, and cylinders.
  • Learn all metric units of measurement for each property as well as the metric prefixes.
  • Come up with reference items in your mind you can imagine with which to compare the length, area, or volume of objects for the estimation part.
  • Learn the meaning behind terms such as precision, accuracy, and significant figures, and read about the history of some units of measure. It may not be directly related to the event performance, but extra knowledge is always great to have!
I also have uploaded the solutions to the exam for the 2013 Grandville Invitational to the test exchange. It isn't exactly a test but it will give you some insight on how to approach stations at a competition and how your event supervisor may be thinking.

http://scioly.org/wiki/images/a/ab/Metr ... al2013.pdf

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Re: Metric Mastery B

Post by phil9047 » February 15th, 2014, 5:12 pm

JustDroobles wrote:
Very important part of the rules: In the measurement portion you MUST measure to the smallest graduation or markings on the instrument plus one estimated digit. For example, on a standard ruler with millimeter markings, you must report centimeter measurements with two decimal places. If the correct answer is 9.11 cm, then 9.1 cm would be incorrect. ( 9cm + .1 + .01 estimated) If the correct answer is 9.00 cm, then 9 cm would be incorrect. ( 9cm + .0 + .00 estimated)
This year's rules says that the answer must be reported in terms of the instrument's resolution so the above answers would actually be 91.1 mm and 90.0 mm.

Also, I have a question regarding the estimated digit rule. If there is a graduated cylinder marked in .5 mL, how should I include the estimated digit and write the answer? Would I write in terms of mL and estimate to a tenth of a milliliter or do I write in terms of mL and estimate to a hundredth of a milliliter?
Sine functions are quite odd, to be honest.

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Re: Metric Mastery B

Post by JustDroobles » February 15th, 2014, 5:34 pm

phil9047 wrote: This year's rules says that the answer must be reported in terms of the instrument's resolution so the above answers would actually be 91.1 mm and 90.0 mm.

Also, I have a question regarding the estimated digit rule. If there is a graduated cylinder marked in .5 mL, how should I include the estimated digit and write the answer? Would I write in terms of mL and estimate to a tenth of a milliliter or do I write in terms of mL and estimate to a hundredth of a milliliter?
Thanks for letting me know about the rule change.

In the case you described, I believe you should estimate to tenths. By the markings you can distinguish between 1.0 mL and 1.5 mL, but figuring out where in between the markings is your estimation. So 1.1, 1.2, etc, should qualify as including an estimated digit.

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Re: Metric Mastery B

Post by tsinzitari » February 24th, 2014, 12:33 pm

Quick Question How far off zero on a balance would you tell a superviser, i usually do if it is more than half way off line I will report

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Re: Metric Mastery B

Post by roadscholar11 » February 24th, 2014, 1:01 pm

Is there a certain amount of digits you need for formula calculations? Because we got points off on an invitational test for not having four digits...

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Re: Metric Mastery B

Post by hscmom » February 24th, 2014, 5:13 pm

tsinzitari wrote:Quick Question How far off zero on a balance would you tell a superviser, i usually do if it is more than half way off line I will report
I would simply ask "May I zero this?"
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