Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C

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Re: Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C

Post by Phys1cs » December 2nd, 2013, 2:45 pm

Maxwellc007 wrote:can anyone point out how we find the history for shock value? I'm not really sure what to look for. What do we search for?

thanks
What type of history do you need? History of people, inventions, concepts?

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Re: Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C

Post by billyhoho » December 3rd, 2013, 8:08 pm

Maxwellc007 wrote:can anyone point out how we find the history for shock value? I'm not really sure what to look for. What do we search for?

thanks
Honestly, I'd just go on Wikipedia and print out every bit of history information I could. It seems the easiest way to amass a bunch of history into a few hours of time and printing. You get a binder anyways, so it's a win-win as well (you don't really need to put much in a binder pertaining to formulas since most of it is pretty easy). Just search things like "Who discovered direct current..."
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Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C

Post by 19kalantarcameron » December 16th, 2013, 11:41 am

Has anyone used a physics b book for studying, if so how has it worked for you

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Re: Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C

Post by Maxwellc007 » December 16th, 2013, 1:04 pm

19kalantarcameron wrote:Has anyone used a physics b book for studying, if so how has it worked for you
Honestly, it's probably better to use more than just a book because it may lack information. You should use some of the practice tests for reference and the packet too. Use the internet to get some info. You can bring a binder so compile info.

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Re: Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C

Post by billyhoho » December 16th, 2013, 7:07 pm

Maxwellc007 wrote:
19kalantarcameron wrote:Has anyone used a physics b book for studying, if so how has it worked for you
Honestly, it's probably better to use more than just a book because it may lack information. You should use some of the practice tests for reference and the packet too. Use the internet to get some info. You can bring a binder so compile info.
Adding to that, you probably won't understand the Physics B book. There's a lot of calculus and Greek lettering and the such. If you're okay with that, then go ahead and buy one. However, you'll probably end up using the internet mostly because, after all, Google is your best friend. ^_^
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Re: Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C

Post by iwonder » December 17th, 2013, 5:09 am

Isn't physics b the non calculus based physics? There's no reason to assume someone wouldn't understand it, and regardless, the parts needed for this event wouldn't have calculus in them... Now, the book's going to have a ton of extra information that you don't need, so it's probably not terribly useful.
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Re: Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C

Post by tangentline » December 18th, 2013, 7:57 pm

Actually... The concept of non-Calculus based physics kind of irks me... Looking at a test such as F=ma requiring non-Calculus based physics, or even the AP B exam makes you mindlessly plug and chug formulas with no conceptual understanding of how they come about.

Speaking of circuits (if division C), RC gives you a chance to use Calculus to your advantage (depending on the problem) / is derived from a differential equation, so what do I have to say about that... Or maximum power transfer even though it is just a mere formula that you'd jump to first before taking derivatives of equations from the circuit.

I'd say physics B level might be as far as the exam your supervisor will write, but it could be much more than that.

Edit: Oops, division B. So I'd actually recommend a generic physics book or circuits book over AP Physics B and to make sure you hit every topic on the rules if it isn't included in the book.

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Re: Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C

Post by jennyk » December 21st, 2013, 1:08 pm

Does the team do the written test portion together, or do each member of the 2 person team do the same test questions separately, and if so, how is that scored?

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Re: Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C

Post by ScienceOlympian » December 21st, 2013, 1:44 pm

jennyk wrote:Does the team do the written test portion together, or do each member of the 2 person team do the same test questions separately, and if so, how is that scored?
Both team members take the same test together. However, they may split up the test if they like because of time restraints.
Also, this event has a lot of labs (in my State there were 8 labs and a written test separate from the stationed labs). I would recommend, IF there are a lot of labs, that one person who specializes in reading and using ammeters, voltmeters, multimeters, finding the poles of a magnet, etc.. or making circuits, do all of the labs and then try the written test, and another person who specializes in theory does the written test. However, if there are 1-2 or no labs, just have them do the test together or split the test.
However, my strategy might not be the best for your team.
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Re: Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C

Post by XelnagaPo » January 12th, 2014, 2:46 pm

I have a few problems with the Clio exam on the test exchange
http://scioly.org/wiki/images/f/f8/DCci ... Clio13.pdf

13. How do you do it? The answer is B.
18. For this, isn't it
V=IR'+IR
24=(22/7.5)R'+22
R'=2*7.5/22=0.6818?

The answer key says A, which is 2.7

Thanks in advance for whoever answers the questions :D

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