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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Posted: September 14th, 2013, 10:29 am
by PacificGoldenPlover
A little bit of topic, but this is one of my favorite quotes ever:

"If all the books and papers that have been written about glaciers were piled into a huge mound it would be of such proportions that the items at the bottoms would be compressed and deform under the weight of the great mass above"

The best part is, it is completely true.

Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Posted: September 14th, 2013, 4:33 pm
by Crazy Puny Man
PacificGoldenPlover wrote:and papers
It sounds to me like you use Google Scholar too :shock: (by "too" I mean in addition to your books)

Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Posted: September 14th, 2013, 5:05 pm
by PacificGoldenPlover
No, that quote was just from a book I was reading. I do know there are a ton of papers out there though, most above my comprehension.

Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Posted: September 25th, 2013, 8:05 pm
by Mathdino
Hey, DP newbie here. The local library has tons of amazing resources, especially textbooks, and I'll be going down there for the next week or so finding good textbooks for studying (also this is Nevada, which is obsessed with mining, so lots of geology info). Do you guys have any recommendations as to any books, websites, papers, etc to look out for? The wiki's great and all but I don't want to just use that.

Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Posted: October 2nd, 2013, 3:45 pm
by christafro
Mathdino wrote:Hey, DP newbie here. The local library has tons of amazing resources, especially textbooks, and I'll be going down there for the next week or so finding good textbooks for studying (also this is Nevada, which is obsessed with mining, so lots of geology info). Do you guys have any recommendations as to any books, websites, papers, etc to look out for? The wiki's great and all but I don't want to just use that.
I have been doing Dynamic Planet for 5 years now. I've found that the best resources for me were online textbooks. Unfortunately, a lot of the ones that I've found you have to buy. Luckily, I found a couple of pdf's online of glacer textbooks that were amazing. I had actually used one of them as my cheat sheets, and I ended placing 3rd at states :D . Good luck!

Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Posted: October 2nd, 2013, 3:48 pm
by christafro
Does anyone know how a pool of water can form in a glacier if there are no crevasses or streams from the outside to feed the water? There was a question on the state test last year, and I didn't know what the answer was. I've looked everywhere for an answer, but I can't find anything.

Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Posted: October 2nd, 2013, 4:33 pm
by chalker
christafro wrote:Does anyone know how a pool of water can form in a glacier if there are no crevasses or streams from the outside to feed the water? There was a question on the state test last year, and I didn't know what the answer was. I've looked everywhere for an answer, but I can't find anything.
This is way outside my areas of expertise, but I would guess they are talking about melt ponds: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melt_pond

Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Posted: October 11th, 2013, 10:00 pm
by rab 666
Hi, newbie here to DP :D Wondering if anyone could give some suggestions as to what to study and what books/websites/other resources would be useful? Thanks so much~

Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Posted: October 12th, 2013, 6:51 am
by zyzzyva980
As always, I suggest starting on the Dynamic Planet Wiki. There's a lot of great stuff on there as well as links to other external resources that you can use as well. For tests, check out our Dynamic Planet Test Exchange 2014.

Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Posted: October 12th, 2013, 11:19 am
by FlyingMonkey85
christafro wrote:Does anyone know how a pool of water can form in a glacier if there are no crevasses or streams from the outside to feed the water? There was a question on the state test last year, and I didn't know what the answer was. I've looked everywhere for an answer, but I can't find anything.
I believe that this is possible due to the intense pressures found deep within the glacier caused by the overlying ice. The pressure melts the ice, as "The melting point of ice falls by 0.0072 °C for each additional atm of pressure applied" (Wikipedia). A related phenomenon is recognized in glaciers called "regelation" in which this pressure melted water reforms into ice when the pressure is reduced.