Dynamic Planet B/C

User avatar
PacificGoldenPlover
Exalted Member
Exalted Member
Posts: 518
Joined: April 10th, 2011, 6:51 pm
Division: Grad
State: CA
Location: Somewhere where you don't normally see Pacific Golden Plovers

Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Post by PacificGoldenPlover » February 7th, 2014, 11:45 am

Are you familiar with http://nsidc.org/ yet?
Life List: n. A list of bird species definitively seen by a birdwatcher.
PacificGoldenPlover's Life List : 319
Most recent lifer: Red-throated Loon

2014 (Mira Loma/Troy/Regionals/States/Nationals)
Dynamic Planet (2/2/1/1/1)
Designer Genes (1/4/1/13 (???)/13 (figures)
Water Quality (1/1/3/1/3)

DynamicPlanet14
Member
Member
Posts: 2
Joined: February 14th, 2014, 9:58 am
Division: C
State: NC

Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Post by DynamicPlanet14 » February 14th, 2014, 12:49 pm

What resources did you guys use to learn how to read USGS maps? I am struggling with the representative activities. Thanks!

User avatar
zyzzyva980
Admin Emeritus
Admin Emeritus
Posts: 1539
Joined: November 18th, 2009, 12:59 pm
Division: Grad
State: IA
Location: Des Moines
Contact:

Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Post by zyzzyva980 » February 14th, 2014, 1:03 pm

From a couple of years in Road Scholar, the best way to learn how to read maps is to read maps.

As unhelpful as that sounds, it works- just take some time to pore over a few maps and understand what every single funny marking means. The USGS website has lots of helpful aids as well.
Olathe North HS, 2011-2013 | National Runner-Up, Sounds of Music (2012)
Never lose the joy of competing in the pursuit of winning

Resources
Site Help: FAQ & IRC
Event Help: [wiki][/wiki] & Image Gallery
Social Networks: scioly.org on Facebook & Twitter

User avatar
EastStroudsburg13
Administrator
Administrator
Posts: 3078
Joined: January 17th, 2009, 7:32 am
Division: Grad
State: MD
Location: At work trying to be a real adult
Contact:

Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Post by EastStroudsburg13 » February 14th, 2014, 2:07 pm

It might be fun to try reading a map of the area that you live in. That way you might be able to recognize certain landmarks on the graph, which will help you remember them in the future. Personally, I like reading maps regardless, but I'm a little insane, so I recognize that it might not be as easy for someone else.
East Stroudsburg South Class of 2012, Alumnus of JT Lambert, Drexel University Class of 2017

Helpful Links
Wiki
Wiki Pages that Need Work
FAQ and SciOly FAQ Wiki
Chat (See IRC Wiki for more info)
BBCode Wiki


So long, and thanks for all the Future Dictator titles!

roadscholar11
Member
Member
Posts: 26
Joined: January 28th, 2014, 6:04 pm
Division: C
State: PA

Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Post by roadscholar11 » February 21st, 2014, 4:13 pm

Does anyone have any ways to study pictures of glaciers? The picture ID sections sometimes trip me up.

mej710
Member
Member
Posts: 24
Joined: September 15th, 2013, 2:48 pm
Division: C
State: NY
Location: Ithaca, NY

Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Post by mej710 » February 22nd, 2014, 5:15 am

roadscholar11 wrote:Does anyone have any ways to study pictures of glaciers? The picture ID sections sometimes trip me up.
One thing that helped me identify glaciers and other features on a topographic map was putting some examples on my note sheets to reference during the event. Or maybe you can look for a few different pictures of the same glacier on google images or something and look for similarities between the pictures so you arent just familiar with what the glacier looks like in one picture and you would be able to see what the most common features are for each type of glacier.

ceg7654
Member
Member
Posts: 131
Joined: December 2nd, 2013, 11:02 am
Division: C
State: CA

Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Post by ceg7654 » February 22nd, 2014, 9:50 am

For the Mesa Robles test, one of the questions was about where glaciers move the fastest. The correct answer was the equilibrium line. Can PacificGoldenPlover or anyone who understands, really, explain to me why this is? I understand why got it wrong but why do glaciers move fastest at the equilibrium line?
2016 Events: Invasive Species, Fossils, Write It Do It

#TehEntoCult

User avatar
PacificGoldenPlover
Exalted Member
Exalted Member
Posts: 518
Joined: April 10th, 2011, 6:51 pm
Division: Grad
State: CA
Location: Somewhere where you don't normally see Pacific Golden Plovers

Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Post by PacificGoldenPlover » February 22nd, 2014, 10:33 am

ceg7654, this is how I understand it works:

Remember that a glacier does not start out in motion. It starts out technically as an ice field moving at 0 m/h- the bergschrund divides this from the rest of the zone of accumulation. Deeper ice means a higher surface-velocity. As ice accumulates throughout the zone of accumulation, the glacier will get progressively faster, until peak at the equilibrium line.

Then, as the ice moves through the ablation zone, it slows down, because the glacier is losing its depth, and in addition topographic irregularities become harder to "navigate" since there is no longer the pressure present to either go around or crush them. So the glacier slows down.

I'm pretty sure that's how it works, though my two glacier books don't say why specifically it happens.

More important to them is the evidence that in the zone of accumulation there is extensional flow, illustrated by snow-covered crevasses, indicating the front of the crevasse is moving faster than the back of the crevasse. Past the equilibrium line, these crevasses gradually close due to the opposite compressional flow.

EDIT: Another reason it may flow faster at the equilibrium line than in the zone of accumulation is because there is more basal water flow present.
Life List: n. A list of bird species definitively seen by a birdwatcher.
PacificGoldenPlover's Life List : 319
Most recent lifer: Red-throated Loon

2014 (Mira Loma/Troy/Regionals/States/Nationals)
Dynamic Planet (2/2/1/1/1)
Designer Genes (1/4/1/13 (???)/13 (figures)
Water Quality (1/1/3/1/3)

colorado mtn science
Member
Member
Posts: 22
Joined: January 9th, 2014, 9:16 am
Division: C
State: CO

Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Post by colorado mtn science » February 25th, 2014, 4:50 pm

ceg7654 wrote:For the Mesa Robles test, one of the questions was about where glaciers move the fastest. The correct answer was the equilibrium line. Can PacificGoldenPlover or anyone who understands, really, explain to me why this is? I understand why got it wrong but why do glaciers move fastest at the equilibrium line?
Although Pacific Golden Plover's answer made sense, technically the fastest part of the glacier is down the middle at the surface (although the equilibrium line is a good answer for what part along the length of a glacier the ice flows fastest)

User avatar
PacificGoldenPlover
Exalted Member
Exalted Member
Posts: 518
Joined: April 10th, 2011, 6:51 pm
Division: Grad
State: CA
Location: Somewhere where you don't normally see Pacific Golden Plovers

Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Post by PacificGoldenPlover » February 25th, 2014, 7:25 pm

While it is true that glaciers move faster in the middle at the surface than at the sides or base, I made it a multiple choice question. Those others were not options on the test.
Life List: n. A list of bird species definitively seen by a birdwatcher.
PacificGoldenPlover's Life List : 319
Most recent lifer: Red-throated Loon

2014 (Mira Loma/Troy/Regionals/States/Nationals)
Dynamic Planet (2/2/1/1/1)
Designer Genes (1/4/1/13 (???)/13 (figures)
Water Quality (1/1/3/1/3)

Locked

Return to “2014 Study Events”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest