Astronomy C

User avatar
EastStroudsburg13
Administrator
Administrator
Posts: 3076
Joined: January 17th, 2009, 7:32 am
Division: Grad
State: MD
Location: At work trying to be a real adult
Contact:

Re: Astronomy C

Post by EastStroudsburg13 » November 22nd, 2013, 6:43 pm

They're the same. Optical just sounds fancier, and (this is just me thinking here, don't quote me on this) "visible" implies that it is the only section that can be seen, and astronomers can see other bands via telescopes, so optical is better semantics-wise.
East Stroudsburg South Class of 2012, Alumnus of JT Lambert, Drexel University Class of 2017

Helpful Links
Wiki
Wiki Pages that Need Work
FAQ and SciOly FAQ Wiki
Chat (See IRC Wiki for more info)
BBCode Wiki


So long, and thanks for all the Future Dictator titles!

syo_astro
Exalted Member
Exalted Member
Posts: 595
Joined: December 3rd, 2011, 9:45 pm
Division: Grad
State: NY
Contact:

Re: Astronomy C

Post by syo_astro » November 22nd, 2013, 8:55 pm

There's also the visible band (somewhat greenish)! On a side note, anyone hear about a new supernova? Thanks forever for bringing it up to me :D.
B: Crave the Wave, Environmental Chemistry, Robo-Cross, Meteorology, Physical Science Lab, Solar System, DyPlan (E and V), Shock Value
C: Microbe Mission, DyPlan (Earth's Fresh Waters), Fermi Questions, GeoMaps, Gravity Vehicle, Scrambler, Rocks, Astronomy
Grad: Writing Tests/Supervising (NY/MI)

User avatar
EastStroudsburg13
Administrator
Administrator
Posts: 3076
Joined: January 17th, 2009, 7:32 am
Division: Grad
State: MD
Location: At work trying to be a real adult
Contact:

Re: Astronomy C

Post by EastStroudsburg13 » November 23rd, 2013, 8:01 am

Or as I like to call it, the "verde" band. (hahaha, visible is greenish, V band, verde is green in Spanish... :P )
East Stroudsburg South Class of 2012, Alumnus of JT Lambert, Drexel University Class of 2017

Helpful Links
Wiki
Wiki Pages that Need Work
FAQ and SciOly FAQ Wiki
Chat (See IRC Wiki for more info)
BBCode Wiki


So long, and thanks for all the Future Dictator titles!

themeltingface
Member
Member
Posts: 1
Joined: November 23rd, 2013, 7:33 am
Division: C
State: TX

Re: Astronomy C

Post by themeltingface » November 23rd, 2013, 8:55 am

foreverphysics wrote:Most of the time, if you post the problem and explain how you did your work, someone will magically crop up and help you out here. There are lots of astronomy notes online for you to look at; understanding those will help you understand how they arrived at the answers.
What Carroll and Ostlie book do you recommend? An Introduction to Modern Astrophysics or An Introduction to Modern Stellar Astrophysics? Or is there another one totally?

User avatar
iridium
Member
Member
Posts: 11
Joined: January 21st, 2013, 5:46 pm
Division: C
State: OH

Re: Astronomy C

Post by iridium » November 23rd, 2013, 9:19 am

Thanks for the help :).

tad_k_22
Member
Member
Posts: 52
Joined: March 29th, 2005, 11:24 am
Division: Grad

Re: Astronomy C

Post by tad_k_22 » November 26th, 2013, 12:15 am

@meltingface: they're the same book, but the text on "Modern Stellar Astrophysics" takes only the chapters from the "Introduction to Modern Astrophysics" related to stellar structure and evolution. If you're planning on studying astronomy in undergrad, I'd get the full text.
Old Events:
Astronomy, Remote Sensing (Both Mars and Global Warming), Dynamic Planet (Oceanography/Earthquakes and Volcanoes), It's About Time, Technical Problem Solving, and I really don't want to count, but did fail at-Fermi Questions.

Cheesy Pie
Member
Member
Posts: 594
Joined: January 29th, 2011, 4:34 pm
Division: Grad
State: MI

Re: Astronomy C

Post by Cheesy Pie » December 22nd, 2013, 10:43 am

I am new to Division C, but have done RFTS for the past two years. I know that Astronomy is much more in-depth than RFTS and that there are more calculations involved. Are there any other major differences that I need to know?
100% of deaths are somehow caused by science.
Don't be a statistic.
Don't do science.

Naperville Central High School '17 :arrow: Michigan State University Physics '21
GO GREEN GO WHITE

Crazy Puny Man
Member
Member
Posts: 265
Joined: May 25th, 2013, 6:25 pm
Division: Grad
State: IN

Re: Astronomy C

Post by Crazy Puny Man » December 22nd, 2013, 5:42 pm

Cheesy Pie wrote:I am new to Division C, but have done RFTS for the past two years. I know that Astronomy is much more in-depth than RFTS and that there are more calculations involved. Are there any other major differences that I need to know?
Generally there are no star charts or constellations in Astro (you probably guessed that), but aside from that, I'd say the events are pretty similar. RFTS experience will help a little
Last edited by Crazy Puny Man on December 22nd, 2013, 6:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
EastStroudsburg13
Administrator
Administrator
Posts: 3076
Joined: January 17th, 2009, 7:32 am
Division: Grad
State: MD
Location: At work trying to be a real adult
Contact:

Re: Astronomy C

Post by EastStroudsburg13 » December 22nd, 2013, 5:50 pm

Basically what CPM said. All of the conceptual stuff is much more in depth, and you need to have knowledge about a wider breadth of information. For example, for stellar evolution, you are expected not only to know what the stages are, but also why they happen. This applies to anything else you might know. Also, the focus on the objects is different, since you need to know why the objects are notable, and other important facts about the objects, rather than being able to identify them in a star chart or planetarium.
East Stroudsburg South Class of 2012, Alumnus of JT Lambert, Drexel University Class of 2017

Helpful Links
Wiki
Wiki Pages that Need Work
FAQ and SciOly FAQ Wiki
Chat (See IRC Wiki for more info)
BBCode Wiki


So long, and thanks for all the Future Dictator titles!

syo_astro
Exalted Member
Exalted Member
Posts: 595
Joined: December 3rd, 2011, 9:45 pm
Division: Grad
State: NY
Contact:

Re: Astronomy C

Post by syo_astro » December 22nd, 2013, 7:11 pm

I'd also like to add that you need to know about variable stars considering the topic, not just stellar evolution. As in knowing EVERY stage, why and how they evolve, why and how they could be variable, and then even with less DSOs a very high level of depth (they may not ask star charts also, but I would recommend knowing their constellation or at least putting it in your binder). But that is to say, they may not ask about EVERY stage of evolution. But certainly from what I heard of Reach it has more depth.
B: Crave the Wave, Environmental Chemistry, Robo-Cross, Meteorology, Physical Science Lab, Solar System, DyPlan (E and V), Shock Value
C: Microbe Mission, DyPlan (Earth's Fresh Waters), Fermi Questions, GeoMaps, Gravity Vehicle, Scrambler, Rocks, Astronomy
Grad: Writing Tests/Supervising (NY/MI)

Locked

Return to “2014 Study Events”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest