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Re: Water Quality B/C

Posted: February 25th, 2014, 10:37 pm
by PacificGoldenPlover
I have.
Just out of curiosity, in what context?
Tests I have written for invitationals. Personally, I like to stray a bit from the rules for the following reason: it helps identify the teams who have really gone out of their way to learn stuff about both coral reefs and estuaries (especially estuaries since "technically" you aren't required to really know any scientific names for organisms living there).

For example, on one invitational test, I asked what genus contains the symbiotic zooxanthallae. Technically, that's not allowed to be asked. But really, we're talking about by far the most important genus in coral reefs. Anyone who has done more than the most cursory study of reefs should have run across this genus (Symbiodinium). If not, all I can say is: you need to study more. This really isn't that hard to find. Get a good coral reef book. If you use wikipedia on zooxanthallae, it redirects you to this genus.

Same thing with the estuaries. I will check to see if you've done your research on mangroves, on cordgrass, etc. If you can't pick out their genus names from a multiple choice question, to me it seems likely that you have not really studied them fully.

Summary of my rant: When I write tests, I try and differentiate the teams that treat the rules as a boundary, and those who use it as a jumping-off point into the REAL marine biology, oceanography, etc. That's what the 5% of questions that I write that are outside the rules are for.

Re: Water Quality B/C

Posted: February 26th, 2014, 6:52 pm
by darkdeserthighway
Tests I have written for invitationals. Personally, I like to stray a bit from the rules for the following reason: it helps identify the teams who have really gone out of their way to learn stuff about both coral reefs and estuaries (especially estuaries since "technically" you aren't required to really know any scientific names for organisms living there).

For example, on one invitational test, I asked what genus contains the symbiotic zooxanthallae. Technically, that's not allowed to be asked. But really, we're talking about by far the most important genus in coral reefs. Anyone who has done more than the most cursory study of reefs should have run across this genus (Symbiodinium). If not, all I can say is: you need to study more. This really isn't that hard to find. Get a good coral reef book. If you use wikipedia on zooxanthallae, it redirects you to this genus.

Same thing with the estuaries. I will check to see if you've done your research on mangroves, on cordgrass, etc. If you can't pick out their genus names from a multiple choice question, to me it seems likely that you have not really studied them fully.

Summary of my rant: When I write tests, I try and differentiate the teams that treat the rules as a boundary, and those who use it as a jumping-off point into the REAL marine biology, oceanography, etc. That's what the 5% of questions that I write that are outside the rules are for.
I understand your logic now, that's cool. So you're basically testing to see how in-depth the knowledge is.

Re: Water Quality B/C

Posted: February 26th, 2014, 6:59 pm
by PacificGoldenPlover
Essentially.

Re: Water Quality B/C

Posted: February 26th, 2014, 7:32 pm
by PicturePerfect
Sorry to intrude, but I recently went to an invitational and encountered a question that's a bit puzzling. How would you answer this:

Q: Which of the organisms below (a-e) has a symbiotic relationship with coral?

a. gorgonia
b. long-spined black sea urchin
c. hard coral
d. pencil urchin
e. crown of thorns starfish

The only symbiotic relationship I know of involving coral is between zooxanthallae and coral. What are your thoughts?
The definition of symbiosis is a relationship between two species where one species benefits. This includes parasitism (not sure about predation, though), so c-o-t starfish might work (p.s. don't always trust inviational tests).
I believe that symbiosis can also include relationships where both species benefit--for example, mutualism.

Also, for my own questions:
Which of these tropical locations is NOT known for its coral reefs?
a. Brazil
b. Caribbean Sea
c. Northern Australia
d. Southeast Asia

In estuaries, most organisms are
a. stenohaline
b. euryhaline
c. metahaline
d. mixohaline

Re: Water Quality B/C

Posted: February 26th, 2014, 7:49 pm
by PacificGoldenPlover
The answer to your first question is Brazil. Despite being in a tropical location, no reefs form because the massive Amazon and Orinoco rivers deliver tons of sediment/nutrients that discourages coral reefs from growing.


For your second question, the answer I believe is euryhaline, meaning it can tolerate a wide variety of salinities.

Re: Water Quality B/C

Posted: February 26th, 2014, 7:58 pm
by PicturePerfect
The answer to your first question is Brazil. Despite being in a tropical location, no reefs form because the massive Amazon and Orinoco rivers deliver tons of sediment/nutrients that discourages coral reefs from growing.


For your second question, the answer I believe is euryhaline, meaning it can tolerate a wide variety of salinities.
Thank you!

Re: Water Quality B/C

Posted: February 26th, 2014, 8:20 pm
by PicturePerfect
Sorry for the double post...
What is the main function of the mesenterial filaments of a coral polyp?
a. They act to stun prey that will then be consumed
b. They provide homes for symbiotic algae
c. They produce gametes that are released during broadcast spawning
d. They are used to attack neighbouring coral colonies

I found websites that say the filaments are used both to capture prey and to attack other colonies, but if you could only pick one, which would it be?

Re: Water Quality B/C

Posted: February 26th, 2014, 10:30 pm
by PacificGoldenPlover
Yeah, I realized that mistake after I made the key. (For what it's worth, when I was grading, I gave points to either answer)

If that were on a test though, I would answer attacking other colonies, simply because it is simply one of many methods by which coral filter feed, while they are the principal way they attack other colonies. If that does come up on another test, you may want to politely let the proctor know.

Sorry for any confusion.

Re: Water Quality B/C

Posted: February 27th, 2014, 9:14 pm
by Watergirl
:D I hope I don't sound nosy and all, but are all those questions from the Mesa Robles Invitational Test? :D

Re: Water Quality B/C

Posted: February 27th, 2014, 9:27 pm
by PicturePerfect
Yeah, I realized that mistake after I made the key. (For what it's worth, when I was grading, I gave points to either answer)

If that were on a test though, I would answer attacking other colonies, simply because it is simply one of many methods by which coral filter feed, while they are the principal way they attack other colonies. If that does come up on another test, you may want to politely let the proctor know.

Sorry for any confusion.
O.O did you write that test?
Okay, thanks!
:D I hope I don't sound nosy and all, but are all those questions from the Mesa Robles Invitational Test? :D
Yes :P