Fossils

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Re: Fossils

Post by GGuy5 » March 27th, 2009, 9:23 am

I liked dinosaurs alot too when i was little :shock: 8-) :ugeek: :geek: :ugeek: 8-)
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Re: Fossils

Post by gneissisnice » March 27th, 2009, 3:04 pm

danger will robinson wrote:Dinos are pretty easy for me, considering I've wanted to be a paleontologist since I was four. I learned all of them from my picture books when I was little. However, how do you know the difference between corals and sponges? They look the same!
Sponges have spicules. Astraeospongia is pretty easy, it's shaped kinda like a vase, and it has little star-patterns on it (those are the spicules).
Corals are easy as well. Tabulated corals are kinda layered; i remember that favosites is kinda like a bunch of stacks, while halysites is like a maze, if that helps. Hexagonaria has hexagon shapes on it, and septastraea is just the random coral.
Horn coral kinda looks like hydnoceras, but horn coral looks like a horn.
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Re: Fossils

Post by soobsession » March 28th, 2009, 7:37 am

gneissisnice wrote: Sponges have spicules. Astraeospongia is pretty easy, it's shaped kinda like a vase, and it has little star-patterns on it (those are the spicules).
Corals are easy as well. Tabulated corals are kinda layered; i remember that favosites is kinda like a bunch of stacks, while halysites is like a maze, if that helps. Hexagonaria has hexagon shapes on it, and septastraea is just the random coral.
yups...thats pretty much the rule of thumb i followed...well, id say that astraeospongia has flower-like spicules but flower and stars are pretty much the same. favosites looks like a honeycomb more or less and halysites looks like its wrapped in chains. i agree with hexagonaria too....and since i never really could find a lot of info on septastraea...i would just say that whichever one isn't halysites, favosites, etc. is septastraea :D

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Re: Fossils

Post by courage7856 » March 28th, 2009, 10:32 am

Do we need to know the six basic body types of dinosaurs (sauropods, theropods, ornithopods, stegosaurs, armored, and horned)? It wasn't in the list, but I think it might be something to know. Also, does anyone know the bone differences between carnivores, omnivores, and herbivores? At Regionals, we were handed a random sample(not a tooth- that would be easy) of bone and were asked to identify it's diet among the 3 types.
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Re: Fossils

Post by Flavorflav » March 28th, 2009, 11:57 am

It would have to be the right bone. The level of the jaw joint will tell you diet without teeth, and there are a number of bones that will tell you the group, which will tell you the diet - like the predentary, or the pubis, or sometimes the maxilla, vertebrae or toes.

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Re: Fossils

Post by courage7856 » March 28th, 2009, 4:44 pm

Oh, that makes a little more sense. Thanks. We just guessed, and I'm pretty sure we got it wrong.
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Re: Fossils

Post by maggymay » March 29th, 2009, 10:14 am

courage7856 wrote:Do we need to know the six basic body types of dinosaurs (sauropods, theropods, ornithopods, stegosaurs, armored, and horned)? It wasn't in the list, but I think it might be something to know. Also, does anyone know the bone differences between carnivores, omnivores, and herbivores? At Regionals, we were handed a random sample(not a tooth- that would be easy) of bone and were asked to identify it's diet among the 3 types.
Are you serious?!? Handed a bit of BONE and asked to identify the diet? Did you all ever get a test key? I'd like to know the answer and the test-writer's rationale behind the question. (I mean, I'm sure it's a great question and make a lot of sense, but sheesh...)

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Re: Fossils

Post by croman74 » March 29th, 2009, 10:17 am

maggymay wrote:
courage7856 wrote:Do we need to know the six basic body types of dinosaurs (sauropods, theropods, ornithopods, stegosaurs, armored, and horned)? It wasn't in the list, but I think it might be something to know. Also, does anyone know the bone differences between carnivores, omnivores, and herbivores? At Regionals, we were handed a random sample(not a tooth- that would be easy) of bone and were asked to identify it's diet among the 3 types.
Are you serious?!? Handed a bit of BONE and asked to identify the diet? Did you all ever get a test key? I'd like to know the answer and the test-writer's rationale behind the question. (I mean, I'm sure it's a great question and make a lot of sense, but sheesh...)
That is a bit mean of the test writer. A tooth would be easy to ID the diet, but anything else is just hard.
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Re: Fossils

Post by blufoster6 » March 29th, 2009, 10:25 am

well coprolites wouldn't have been that hard
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Re: Fossils

Post by gneissisnice » March 29th, 2009, 10:42 am

Well, if they give you the hip bones, you should be able to narrow it down to saurician or ornithician, and then maybe find the diet from that?
2009 events:
Fossils: 1st @ reg. 3rd @ states (stupid dinosaurs...) 5th @ nats.
Dynamic: 1st @ reg. 19thish @ states, 18th @ nats
Herpetology (NOT the study of herpes): NA
Enviro Chem: 39th @ states =(
Cell Bio: 9th @ reg. 18th @ nats
Remote: 6th @ states 3rd @ Nats
Ecology: 5th @ Nats

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