Anatomy B/C Question Marathon

Test your knowledge of various Science Olympiad events
Whoppers
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Re: Anatomy B/C Question Marathon

Post by Whoppers » October 18th, 2013, 6:34 pm

fantasyfan wrote:I was trying to let someone else go, but it's been long enough so I will.

Evolutionarily, they have different functions. Your head hair protects you from sunburn while eyebrows just protect your eyes from dust.

Anatomically, eyebrow hairs have a shorter growing phase than head hair
Correct in a sense.
The hair on our scalp has an anagen stage of 2-7 years depending on the individual's diet, age, and health in general. Other parts of our bodies (eyebrows, lashes, underarms etc) have a shorter anagen stage. For example, eyebrows are around 4 months.
Your turn!

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Re: Anatomy B/C Question Marathon

Post by fantasyfan » October 18th, 2013, 7:40 pm

Sorry, my textbook doesn't go very into depth about hair, I actually think the writer had something against the integumentary system in general. :cry:

Which structures form the elaborate patterns in thick skin, and what is the purpose of those structures?
Looking forward to anatomy, protein, fossils, and optics (NYS trial) this year!

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Re: Anatomy B/C Question Marathon

Post by Crazy Puny Man » October 18th, 2013, 8:02 pm

fantasyfan wrote:Sorry, my textbook doesn't go very into depth about hair, I actually think the writer had something against the integumentary system in general. :cry:

Which structures form the elaborate patterns in thick skin, and what is the purpose of those structures?
Which book/author do you have?

Also, Whoppers, can you tell us what your source was for that?
Epidermal ridges, which are formed when the epidermis projects down into the spaces between the dermal papillae during fetal development. The ridges increase the surface area of the epidermis and allow a firmer grip in the thick skin areas, i.e. the fingertips, palms, & soles

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Re: Anatomy B/C Question Marathon

Post by fantasyfan » October 19th, 2013, 2:33 pm

The book is Essentials of Anatomy & Physiology. I don't have it with me at the moment and don't know the author offhand.
You are correct. For the second part, you are also correct, but the answer I was looking for was that the epidermal ridges help get nutrients into the epidermis because the epidermis doesn't have it's own blood vessels.

Your turn :D
Looking forward to anatomy, protein, fossils, and optics (NYS trial) this year!

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Re: Anatomy B/C Question Marathon

Post by Crazy Puny Man » October 19th, 2013, 3:13 pm

fantasyfan wrote:The book is Essentials of Anatomy & Physiology. I don't have it with me at the moment and don't know the author offhand.
You are correct. For the second part, you are also correct, but the answer I was looking for was that the epidermal ridges help get nutrients into the epidermis because the epidermis doesn't have it's own blood vessels.

Your turn :D
There are tons of authors who have written a book with that title...>_>

Um...I think that's kinda debatable...I suppose that works, but even then, dermal papillae exist throughout your skin, right? Epidermal ridges don't, they exist in certain parts of the skin. I imagine the density of the blood vessels in the papillary region is the primary source of its nutrients...but then again, I suppose thick skin could use the extra help in getting the nutrients that way, since it's thicker than thin skin.

Whatever, that was the most obvious answer to me

Anyway, next question (I'm bringing this back to the nervous system :P): describe the anatomical differences between the sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions of the autonomic nervous system in terms of motor output, the location of ganglia, and differences in the preganglionic & postganglionic fibers of both divisions

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Re: Anatomy B/C Question Marathon

Post by fantasyfan » October 20th, 2013, 7:13 pm

The authors are: Martini/Bartholomew
And also, epidermal ridges are just the opposite of dermal papillae and exist everywhere throughout the skin aswell. They are just more apparent in thick skin due to size and alignment
Looking forward to anatomy, protein, fossils, and optics (NYS trial) this year!

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Re: Anatomy B/C Question Marathon

Post by Crazy Puny Man » October 20th, 2013, 7:20 pm

Huh. I have a Martini too :D

Oh...I didn't look at it that way...

EDIT: hey, I imagine one of you knows the answer to my question...lemme post it again

Describe the anatomical differences between the sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions of the autonomic nervous system in terms of motor output, the location of ganglia, and differences in the preganglionic & postganglionic fibers of both divisions (is there anything confusing about the wording of this question?)

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Re: Anatomy B/C Question Marathon

Post by AstroRockShock » October 25th, 2013, 10:06 pm

Crazy Puny Man wrote:Huh. I have a Martini too :D

Oh...I didn't look at it that way...

EDIT: hey, I imagine one of you knows the answer to my question...lemme post it again

Describe the anatomical differences between the sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions of the autonomic nervous system in terms of motor output, the location of ganglia, and differences in the preganglionic & postganglionic fibers of both divisions (is there anything confusing about the wording of this question?)
Sympathetic division of the autonomic system prepares the body for an action and the parasympathetic divions controls digestion, urinationation, and actions such as those.
Basal ganglia is near the center of the brain
Preganglionic fibers are in the central nervous system while the postganglionic fibers are in the peripherial nervous system.

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Re: Anatomy B/C Question Marathon

Post by Crazy Puny Man » October 26th, 2013, 8:44 am

Well, all that is right (though I THINK the last one doesn't apply in all cases, somebody correct me if I'm wrong there), but not quite what I was looking for...

When I say "motor output," I'm referring anatomically to where the afferent fibers (preganglionic neurons) of both systems originate. Here's a hint for that part: the sympathetic division is also called the thoracolumbar division, and the parasympathetic division is also known as the craniosacral division. (Now include these names in your answer for this part of the question...explain why they're named this way)

When I say "location of ganglia," I mean the location of the sympathetic & the parasympathetic ganglia. The sympathetic trunk ganglia are an example

(By the way, the "basal ganglia" are not actually ganglia, they are in the CNS so the correct term is "basal nuclei"...EDIT: though it's probably better to refer to them as "basal ganglia" anyway because that's what seems to be the term more widely used)

And for the preganglionic & postganglionic fibers...talk about differences in their length and what neurotransmitters each releases...for example, sympathetic preganglionic fibers release acetylcholine, and parasympathetic preganglionic fibers also release acetylcholine

Does that make things clearer?

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Re: Anatomy B/C Question Marathon

Post by if_only » December 15th, 2013, 11:37 am

Crazy Puny Man wrote:Well, all that is right (though I THINK the last one doesn't apply in all cases, somebody correct me if I'm wrong there), but not quite what I was looking for...

When I say "motor output," I'm referring anatomically to where the afferent fibers (preganglionic neurons) of both systems originate. Here's a hint for that part: the sympathetic division is also called the thoracolumbar division, and the parasympathetic division is also known as the craniosacral division. (Now include these names in your answer for this part of the question...explain why they're named this way)

When I say "location of ganglia," I mean the location of the sympathetic & the parasympathetic ganglia. The sympathetic trunk ganglia are an example

(By the way, the "basal ganglia" are not actually ganglia, they are in the CNS so the correct term is "basal nuclei"...EDIT: though it's probably better to refer to them as "basal ganglia" anyway because that's what seems to be the term more widely used)

And for the preganglionic & postganglionic fibers...talk about differences in their length and what neurotransmitters each releases...for example, sympathetic preganglionic fibers release acetylcholine, and parasympathetic preganglionic fibers also release acetylcholine

Does that make things clearer?
the afferent fibers of the sympathetic nervous system extend from the thoracic and first two lumbar segments of the spinal cord which is why it is also called the thoracolumbar division.  The afferent fibers of the parasympathetic nervous system extend from the cranial nerves and the sacral regions (S2-S4) of the spinal cord.  Sympathetic ganglia are organized in a chainlike fashion on the sides of the spinal cord.  Parasympathetic ganglia are located close to or inside organs that they innervate.  Sympathetic preganglionic fibers are short and the postganglionic fibers are long, I think?  Parasympathetic is the opposite, preganglionic fibers are long and postganglionic fibers are short.  For the parasympathetic nervous system, the preganglionic and postganglionic fibers both release acetylcholine.  The preganglionic of sympathetic release acetylcholine while the postganglionic release norepinephrine.

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