Anatomy B/C Question Marathon

Test your knowledge of various Science Olympiad events
Crazy Puny Man
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Re: Anatomy B/C Question Marathon

Post by Crazy Puny Man » December 15th, 2013, 12:28 pm

You got it! :D

Your turn

if_only
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Re: Anatomy B/C Question Marathon

Post by if_only » December 15th, 2013, 1:19 pm

Yay! Sooo..
My question: Describe the process of hearing.

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Re: Anatomy B/C Question Marathon

Post by Sciolapedia » December 15th, 2013, 2:46 pm

It begins with the auricle funneling the sound waves from the environment into the ear. The sound waves then hit the tympanic membrane where they are converted into vibrations. These vibrations travel through the 3 ossicles(small bones in ear) where they are amplified. First the malleus then incus then stapes. Then they travel through the oval window into the cochlea. The vibrations cause the fluid in the cochlea to vibrate which causes them to stimulate the hair cells located on the Organ of Corti in the vestibule. The vibration of the hair cells stimulates a nerve impulse by the cochlear nerve which eventually reaches the temporal lobe where it is interpreted by the brain.

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Re: Anatomy B/C Question Marathon

Post by if_only » December 15th, 2013, 3:26 pm

Sciolapedia wrote:It begins with the auricle funneling the sound waves from the environment into the ear. The sound waves then hit the tympanic membrane where they are converted into vibrations. These vibrations travel through the 3 ossicles(small bones in ear) where they are amplified. First the malleus then incus then stapes. Then they travel through the oval window into the cochlea. The vibrations cause the fluid in the cochlea to vibrate which causes them to stimulate the hair cells located on the Organ of Corti in the vestibule. The vibration of the hair cells stimulates a nerve impulse by the cochlear nerve which eventually reaches the temporal lobe where it is interpreted by the brain.
Woohoo! You got it! :D

Your turn to ask a question

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Re: Anatomy B/C Question Marathon

Post by Sciolapedia » December 17th, 2013, 4:39 pm

1. Besides the stratum lucidum, what are the differences between thick and thin skin?
2. Name and explicitly describe the 3 stages of hair growth.

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Re: Anatomy B/C Question Marathon

Post by vennowsah » January 16th, 2014, 9:38 pm

Sciolapedia wrote:1. Besides the stratum lucidum, what are the differences between thick and thin skin?
2. Name and explicitly describe the 3 stages of hair growth.
1. Thin skin is hairy, lack dermal papillae and has more sebaceous glands and fewer sweat glands and sensory receptors. Thick skin is hairless, has many dermal papillae, and more sensory receptors.
2. The three phases of hair growth are anagen, catagen, and telogen. Anagen is the growth phase in which the cells in the root of the hair divides rapidly. A new hair is formed and pushes the club hair up the follicle and out. The hair grows about 10cm per year during this phase, and grows for about 2-6 years. Catagen is a transitional phase at the end of anagen which lasts about 2-3 weeks. Growth stops and the follicle shrinks about 1/6 of its normal length and attaches to the root of the hair, which forms what is known as a club hair. Telogen is the resting phase following catagen which lasts about 2-4 months. During this period, the hair growth remains dormant and attached to the follicle, and dermal papilla stays in a resting stage. After the telogen phase expires, the hair follicle re-enters the anagen phase.The dermal papilla and the base of the follicle join together again and a new hair begins to form.
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Re: Anatomy B/C Question Marathon

Post by glitchmaster77 » March 4th, 2014, 9:51 pm

That's correct
What are some characteristics of Melanoma
example: what are some symptoms, its mortality rate, etc.

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Re: Anatomy B/C Question Marathon

Post by vennowsah » March 4th, 2014, 10:37 pm

glitchmaster77 wrote:That's correct
What are some characteristics of Melanoma
example: what are some symptoms, its mortality rate, etc.
Melanoma develops in melanocytes, and is caused by awry with melanocytes, mostly due to prolonged exposure to UV light. Symptoms can include a change in existing mole, or the spread of a new pigment or unusual looking growth on the skin. The 5-year survival rate for patients whose melanoma is detected before the tumor begins to spread to lymph nodes or other organs is about 98 percent. The survival rate is 62 percent when the disease reaches the lymph nodes, and 15 percent when the disease reaches distant organs. Treatments for melanoma include surgery, chemotherapy, biological therapy, and targeted therapy.
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Re: Anatomy B/C Question Marathon

Post by glitchmaster77 » March 5th, 2014, 3:51 pm

correct!
your turn

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Re: Anatomy B/C Question Marathon

Post by vennowsah » March 5th, 2014, 4:39 pm

1) Explain the difference between primary skin lesions and secondary skin lesions.
2) What is the amygdala?
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