Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C Question Marathon

Test your knowledge of various Science Olympiad events
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Re: Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C Question Marathon

Post by PicturePerfect » January 30th, 2014, 10:29 pm

Phys1cs wrote:tangentline, what is the way AP physics teaches?

next question:

What quantities do these units represent?
Amps, Farads, Ohms, Henry, Volts, Coulomb, and Watt?
Amps: Current
Ohms: Resistance
Volts: Voltage
Farads: Capacitance
Henry: Inductance
Coulomb: Electric charge
Watt: Rate of energy conversion
If this is right, someone else can post a question for me.
2012-2013 Event Name | Best Finish |
Heredity | 2nd
Forestry | 3rd
Food Science | 5th
Team | 1st

2013-2014 Event Name | Best Finish |
Heredity | 4th
Water Quality | 7th
Shock Value | 7th
Wheeled Vehicle | 7th

2014-2015 Event Name | Best Finish |

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Re: Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C Question Marathon

Post by tangentline » February 4th, 2014, 12:37 am

Image

Assuming at t=0, these capacitors are uncharged
Ignoring the right branch with the 500 ohm resistor as if it was not there, write a function of the voltage vs. time across the 10 amp source.

Completely optional, just food for thought: Don't ignore the right branch and find the current through R1 as a function of time (or at an arbitrary time value say 5 seconds). Unless there is a way to use "formulas" in some fancy way, it's going to take some differential equation knowledge.

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Re: Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C Question Marathon

Post by Bozongle » February 17th, 2014, 3:50 pm

Let's get a bit of Shock Value/magnetism in here.

You have two electromagnets. Electromagnet A and Electromagnet B. They both have the same number of turns (N=100), same current going through them (I=1A), and same metal cores (Iron). However, Electromagnet A is half the length of Electromagnet B. Which one has the greater magnetic field, and why?

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Re: Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C Question Marathon

Post by Phys1cs » February 17th, 2014, 6:52 pm

Bozongle wrote:Let's get a bit of Shock Value/magnetism in here.

You have two electromagnets. Electromagnet A and Electromagnet B. They both have the same number of turns (N=100), same current going through them (I=1A), and same metal cores (Iron). However, Electromagnet A is half the length of Electromagnet B. Which one has the greater magnetic field, and why?
[hide]Electromagnet A, because the magnetic field is equal number of turns*I*perm. of free space is divided by the length. If you have a larger length (as does em B) then there will be a smaller magnetic field. Therefore, em A has a larger magnetic field [/hide]


Isn't this more of a Maglev question? I have never seen something like this on my circuits tests, but this equation comes up all the time in my MagLev tests

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Re: Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C Question Marathon

Post by Bozongle » February 17th, 2014, 7:27 pm

Phys1cs wrote:
Bozongle wrote:Let's get a bit of Shock Value/magnetism in here.

You have two electromagnets. Electromagnet A and Electromagnet B. They both have the same number of turns (N=100), same current going through them (I=1A), and same metal cores (Iron). However, Electromagnet A is half the length of Electromagnet B. Which one has the greater magnetic field, and why?
[hide]Electromagnet A, because the magnetic field is equal number of turns*I*perm. of free space is divided by the length. If you have a larger length (as does em B) then there will be a smaller magnetic field. Therefore, em A has a larger magnetic field [/hide]


Isn't this more of a Maglev question? I have never seen something like this on my circuits tests, but this equation comes up all the time in my MagLev tests
It's a Shock Value question, as the event includes 50% circuits and 50% magnetism.

It's basically the division B combination of Circuit Lab and Maglev

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Re: Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C Question Marathon

Post by Phys1cs » February 18th, 2014, 3:51 am

Bozongle wrote:
Phys1cs wrote:
Bozongle wrote:Let's get a bit of Shock Value/magnetism in here.

You have two electromagnets. Electromagnet A and Electromagnet B. They both have the same number of turns (N=100), same current going through them (I=1A), and same metal cores (Iron). However, Electromagnet A is half the length of Electromagnet B. Which one has the greater magnetic field, and why?
[hide]Electromagnet A, because the magnetic field is equal number of turns*I*perm. of free space is divided by the length. If you have a larger length (as does em B) then there will be a smaller magnetic field. Therefore, em A has a larger magnetic field [/hide]


Isn't this more of a Maglev question? I have never seen something like this on my circuits tests, but this equation comes up all the time in my MagLev tests
It's a Shock Value question, as the event includes 50% circuits and 50% magnetism.

It's basically the division B combination of Circuit Lab and Maglev
Oh, okay! Makes sense.

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Re: Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C Question Marathon

Post by phil9047 » February 28th, 2014, 10:16 pm

Since nobody has been posting questions, I will post a question that I recently encountered.
Design a circuit with a light bulb and two switches such that each time a switch is changed, the state of the light bulb is changed (aka on to off or off to on). It should be energy-conservative, meaning that you should not have short circuits at any point.
Think about different types of switches
Sine functions are quite odd, to be honest.

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Re: Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C Question Marathon

Post by tangentline » March 1st, 2014, 12:24 pm

phil9047 wrote:Since nobody has been posting questions, I will post a question that I recently encountered.
Design a circuit with a light bulb and two switches such that each time a switch is changed, the state of the light bulb is changed (aka on to off or off to on). It should be energy-conservative, meaning that you should not have short circuits at any point.
Think about different types of switches
I went off to think and wanted to short circuit that freaking lightbulb so badly and came back here looking at the rules
--And I also wondered what would happen if I opened the switch that I just closed to make it light go on what would happen (LOL, a little brain mesh up)


Probably cheating, because I can imagine a switch that can have a million different states and want a simple answer:
Two switches as inputs to an exclusive or gate!

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Re: Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C Question Marathon

Post by Bozongle » March 1st, 2014, 1:21 pm

Well thing is are you supplied a logic gate to work with? Im not sure if that's in the context of the problem

I think I found the answer, couldn't you connect two SPDT switches together then in series with the light bulb?

Every time one switch changes the state of the light bulb is changed.

Here's a pic for reference (pardon my terrible paint skills):
Image

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Re: Shock Value B/Circuit Lab C Question Marathon

Post by phil9047 » March 2nd, 2014, 9:41 pm

Bozongle, that is correct. I couldn't figure it out, but my dad, an electrical engineer, also came up with the same circuit design. 2 SPDT switches together in series with lightbulb. Your turn to question.
Sine functions are quite odd, to be honest.

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