Dynamic Planet B/C Question Marathon

Test your knowledge of various Science Olympiad events
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PacificGoldenPlover
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C Question Marathon

Postby PacificGoldenPlover » September 8th, 2013, 5:07 pm

Just putting it out there, surges do NOT occur due to sudden accumulation. It would require a ridiculously large amount of snow dropped over a huge surface area. Surges happen due to greatly enhanced basal slip, and relative to the glacier thickness, there really is no situation where basal water pressure could be that much affected simply by accumulation.

In addition, mass accumulation does not explain why the vast majority of surges are cyclical.
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C Question Marathon

Postby Crazy Puny Man » September 9th, 2013, 8:35 pm

Not even through avalanches or landslides? Sure, not too much cyclical, but not even possible?

They also occur due to bedrock failure/sudden slippage...which, to my understanding, is caused by an accumulation of stress in the glacier which can can result from slow-moving ice at the terminus 'damming' up faster-moving ice up-glacier, and the glacier surges once the stress goes beyond a certain 'critical point.'

Could that also (somewhat) explain the cyclical nature of surges too? In certain cases?

EDIT: what is your source(s) for this information? and in general too, if you wouldn't mind sharing xD

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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C Question Marathon

Postby PacificGoldenPlover » September 10th, 2013, 7:55 am

Crazy Puny Man wrote:Not even through avalanches or landslides? Sure, not too much cyclical, but not even possible?

They also occur due to bedrock failure/sudden slippage...which, to my understanding, is caused by an accumulation of stress in the glacier which can can result from slow-moving ice at the terminus 'damming' up faster-moving ice up-glacier, and the glacier surges once the stress goes beyond a certain 'critical point.'

Could that also (somewhat) explain the cyclical nature of surges too? In certain cases?

EDIT: what is your source(s) for this information? and in general too, if you wouldn't mind sharing xD

Well, for instance, glaciers are fairly picky as to whether or not they will surge. If a glacier is a nonsurging glacier, then it will almost certainly not surge even if a lot of snow is placed on top of it.

Glaciers surge because stress causes a positive feedback cycle where channels in the ice collapse, forcing the meltwater to travel to the base of the glacier, essentially lifting the glacier up. So, if immediately a after a surge an avalanche fell on a glacier, the glacier would not surge because it needs time for these channels to reform.

It's kind of a chicken-and-egg question. I see where you are coming from, but I still say location, history, and the state of englacial meltwater are all much better determiners for whether or not a glacier will surge.
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C Question Marathon

Postby Crazy Puny Man » September 11th, 2013, 5:14 pm

PacificGoldenPlover wrote:
Crazy Puny Man wrote:Not even through avalanches or landslides? Sure, not too much cyclical, but not even possible?

They also occur due to bedrock failure/sudden slippage...which, to my understanding, is caused by an accumulation of stress in the glacier which can can result from slow-moving ice at the terminus 'damming' up faster-moving ice up-glacier, and the glacier surges once the stress goes beyond a certain 'critical point.'

Could that also (somewhat) explain the cyclical nature of surges too? In certain cases?

EDIT: what is your source(s) for this information? and in general too, if you wouldn't mind sharing xD

Well, for instance, glaciers are fairly picky as to whether or not they will surge. If a glacier is a nonsurging glacier, then it will almost certainly not surge even if a lot of snow is placed on top of it.

Glaciers surge because stress causes a positive feedback cycle where channels in the ice collapse, forcing the meltwater to travel to the base of the glacier, essentially lifting the glacier up. So, if immediately a after a surge an avalanche fell on a glacier, the glacier would not surge because it needs time for these channels to reform.

It's kind of a chicken-and-egg question. I see where you are coming from, but I still say location, history, and the state of englacial meltwater are all much better determiners for whether or not a glacier will surge.


Um...I'm not sure I follow you >_> The channels are in the middle of the glacier, i.e. not at the base, right? Also, wouldn't the meltwater travel to the base through moulins? Moulins are how supraglacial meltwater gets down to the base...

Are you saying that the meltwater, instead of traveling through tunnels in the ice, percolate/leak through the glacier and travel to the base? Or that the added stress simply increases pressure & therefore lowers the ice's melting point?

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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C Question Marathon

Postby PacificGoldenPlover » September 11th, 2013, 5:59 pm

I will respond on the regular dp thread.

EDIT: Since it has been a while since anyone has posted any questions, I'll post one:

What is the largest nonpolar, non icecap glacier in the world? Which countries is it located in? What is its geopolitical importance, and how is this importance accelerating its retreat?
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C Question Marathon

Postby BYHscioly » September 12th, 2013, 6:58 pm

It's the Siachen glacier, located somewhere in the Kashmir region (India/Pakistan/China). It's important since it's one of the sites of territorial conflict between India and Pakistan, and the conflict - the heat and stuff generated from the military operations - sped up its retreat to 110 meters a year as of now.

What are D-O events, how are they caused, what are they like, and how do they effect the cryosphere?
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C Question Marathon

Postby PacificGoldenPlover » September 12th, 2013, 8:54 pm

Not sure I know the answer to all the parts. Here goes:

D-O stands for Dansgaard-Oeschger event. It is the phenomenon where global temperatures rapidly warm following a glacial period. I would assume they are a byproduct of the Milankovitch Cycle, but not positive what specifically about them causes it. As said before, they lead to massive warming, thus rapid retreat of glaciers, ice sheets after a glacial maximum.

Belated affirmative to my previous question.
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C Question Marathon

Postby Crazy Puny Man » September 17th, 2013, 5:49 am

Plover, I think that's your cue to post the next question...you got the last one right, after all

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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C Question Marathon

Postby PacificGoldenPlover » September 17th, 2013, 9:02 pm

Whatever, here goes.
the first ice core ever drilled to the bottom of an ice sheet was located where?
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C Question Marathon

Postby Crazy Puny Man » September 18th, 2013, 5:14 pm

God dammit! Why can I never answer your questions :x

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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C Question Marathon

Postby BYHscioly » September 21st, 2013, 6:27 am

If Google is reliable, I think the first ice core to hit bedrock was drilled in Byrd Station, Antarctica in 1968. The first one in Greenland (from my searching) that I could find was part of the GISP project and hit bedrock in 1991.

Heinrich events, where massive amounts of icebergs break off from glaciers, occur when? Is the temperature warm or cold? How do these events affect the oceans?
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C Question Marathon

Postby PacificGoldenPlover » September 24th, 2013, 7:03 pm

The answer I was actually looking for was Camp Century, but I'll let you have it.

Also, I'll let someone else answer the next question :p
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C Question Marathon

Postby PacificGoldenPlover » October 15th, 2013, 4:43 pm

Oh well, I'll post the next question:

Why is the Variegated Glacier important to glaciologists? Also, where is Variegated Glacier located?
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C Question Marathon

Postby JAKE » October 30th, 2013, 6:08 pm

it is important becuase it surges every 20 years and its located in Svalbard, Candidian Artic Islands, Alaska, and Ice Land

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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C Question Marathon

Postby JAKE » October 30th, 2013, 6:09 pm

sorry for the spelling errors


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