Write It Do It B/C

mjcox2000
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Re: Write It Do It B/C

Postby mjcox2000 » February 22nd, 2015, 4:24 pm

I was practicing today and used a Lego piece that reminded me of a chair. It was shaped like this: I_ Would it be ok to refer to it as the "chair" piece, or would that be considered using code since it's not really a chair?
The first time you reference the piece, you should call it something along the lines of "the lego piece that looks like a chair" - that way, (a) the event supervisors would understand what piece you were talking about and wouldn't mark you down for it (I kind of doubt they'd mark you down for that being a code, but better safe than sorry), and more importantly, (b) you wouldn't confuse your partner. After the first reference, though, you should probably be fine calling it a "chair piece".
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2019:
Circuit Lab: 1st
Thermodynamics: 2nd
Sounds of Music: 5th
Mission Possible: 6th

2018:
Code Busters (trial): 1st

2015:
Simple Machines: 2nd
SumoBots (trial): 2nd

2014:
WIDI: 2nd
Simple Machines: 3rd

Gemma W
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Re: Write It Do It B/C

Postby Gemma W » February 22nd, 2015, 4:29 pm

"Code" is not very well defined in the rules, I would ask individual supervisors exactly how they define it. Personally I use descriptors like that all the time and it doesn't seem to be a problem, but for all I know I could have been penalized for it and never have found out. I think they're more concerned with predetermined codes that are used to shorten phrases, though.
2015 events: WIDI, Protein Modeling, Geomapping, Chem Lab

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2013 events: WIDI, Mousetrap Vehicle, Heredity, Food Science, Metric Mastery

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Re: Write It Do It B/C

Postby hscmom » February 22nd, 2015, 5:22 pm

I have coached and now judged (just at an invitational) WIDI and I consider code to be something that someone couldn't read in English. So if your instruction said "TL pp 6.8 SRV #3 --> 2.55" I'd call that code. And if you write "12 cm" without defining cm = centimeter, then that's code. But I'm fine with incomplete sentences such as "Blue block on green disk." It lacks a verb and your third grade teacher would mark it off as being a fragment, but it's not code - it's readable. And, the spelling and handwriting needs to be only good enough that it's readable by a very tolerant judge. That's my opinion.

I'd be fine with calling that piece a "Lego chair" or even a "chair" or "chare." If the builder can figure out what the writer is talking about, good enough...

Last week, I giggled at our B team when the writer instructed to "puke the toothpick..." ("No, that's not a puke, it's a poke," she explained)
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Re: Write It Do It B/C

Postby samlan16 » February 22nd, 2015, 6:11 pm

I have coached and now judged (just at an invitational) WIDI and I consider code to be something that someone couldn't read in English. So if your instruction said "TL pp 6.8 SRV #3 --> 2.55" I'd call that code. And if you write "12 cm" without defining cm = centimeter, then that's code. But I'm fine with incomplete sentences such as "Blue block on green disk." It lacks a verb and your third grade teacher would mark it off as being a fragment, but it's not code - it's readable. And, the spelling and handwriting needs to be only good enough that it's readable by a very tolerant judge. That's my opinion.

I'd be fine with calling that piece a "Lego chair" or even a "chair" or "chare." If the builder can figure out what the writer is talking about, good enough...

Last week, I giggled at our B team when the writer instructed to "puke the toothpick..." ("No, that's not a puke, it's a poke," she explained)
Unfortunately, the definition of "code" is subjective in this event; some judges, like hscmom, are incredibly lenient and allow most things to go through. However, some judges, like the technical writing professor who will likely judge your state test, will consider anything poorly qualified to be code and will tier 2 those teams with bad writers.

Like I said, play it safe. If you absolutely need to write things in shorthand, describe the piece/ position precisely, then say in parenthesis what the shorthand version is. You should also do this for unit abbreviations as stated earlier. For example, your first line could read something like this:

Take the white K'nex 8-slot piece with a hole in the center (henceforth white snowflake) and place it on top of the white styrofoam 8 centimeter (cm) by 8 cm block (henceforth base).
Remember, we are proud of every team that participated and you are all winners.

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Re: Write It Do It B/C

Postby boomvroomshroom » March 10th, 2015, 2:29 pm

Does judging for this event vary? I know that you get points per piece that is in the correct place, but what are some general error cutoffs? (ex: something 1cm off vs. something in right spot but oriented wrong)

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Re: Write It Do It B/C

Postby samlan16 » March 10th, 2015, 4:08 pm

Does judging for this event vary? I know that you get points per piece that is in the correct place, but what are some general error cutoffs? (ex: something 1cm off vs. something in right spot but oriented wrong)
Yes, like I said, it's subjective in that there is no real scoring rubric defined anywhere to describe what needs scoring. Some common point deductions include using the wrong color of an object, orienting the object incorrectly, and placing an object in the wrong spot. Other judges may penalize you for differences as low as 1 mm away from where an object is supposed to be (i.e. Wright State), 10 degrees too high, and objects that clearly cannot be supported as on the model. I recommend using your discretion.
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Re: Write It Do It B/C

Postby Skink » March 10th, 2015, 4:43 pm

Right, as the Doer, assume that the model in the ether somewhere has to be replicated exactly. I've been involved with State-level arbitration over party pick colors, of all things. It's not pretty. Orientation is even more obviously important. Some supervisors are more precise than others, but that doesn't matter much from your perspective because you have to strive to perform your best, anyway! Giving yourself wiggle room doesn't really make the task easier or improve your performance. I'd be more concerned with something being oriented rightly than positioned exactly, then. There's a greater chance of losing points on the former.

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Re: Write It Do It B/C

Postby bernard » March 10th, 2015, 5:02 pm

Right, as the Doer, assume that the model in the ether somewhere has to be replicated exactly. I've been involved with State-level arbitration over party pick colors, of all things. It's not pretty. Orientation is even more obviously important. Some supervisors are more precise than others, but that doesn't matter much from your perspective because you have to strive to perform your best, anyway! Giving yourself wiggle room doesn't really make the task easier or improve your performance. I'd be more concerned with something being oriented rightly than positioned exactly, then. There's a greater chance of losing points on the former.
How does arbitration work for this event, when often you don't know your exact results or how the event supervisor judged your doing?
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Re: Write It Do It B/C

Postby Skink » March 10th, 2015, 5:15 pm

I mean, most events at Regionals and up share that problem of...nobody really knowing how the ES scores participants. It's a problem we kind of just accept after while, especially if the testimonies in the poorly ran events topic are any metric :x . In this case, though, it goes something like this:
bernard: Your instructions stink because blah blah blah...
(omitted)
Skink: The green toothpick was supposed to be stuck this far into the cup at a sixty degree angle...like I said.
bernard: Uhhhhhh...I didn't have any green toothpicks...
We tell our coach, and the ball gets rolling.

Since I'm on the subject, this event also is prone to arbitration in cases where, say, the rotation between Writer and Doer is mismanaged, which permits communication either between partners midway into the event or from a team that has competed to a team that hasn't. I fought the former once because there was one room less than there should have been for the event, but I lost it because it was an invitational :| .

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Re: Write It Do It B/C

Postby boomvroomshroom » March 11th, 2015, 8:58 pm

Any WIDI judges out there? What things do you look for/consider most important?


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