Protein Modeling C

bernard
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Re: Protein Modeling C

Postby bernard » February 22nd, 2015, 10:17 pm

Is a pre-build of restriction endonuclease foki necessary for all levels of competition (regional, state, national)?
Yes.
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Re: Protein Modeling C

Postby SAmoyo » February 22nd, 2015, 10:52 pm

Thank you. And will it still be of amino acids 421-560?

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Re: Protein Modeling C

Postby bernard » February 22nd, 2015, 10:59 pm

Thank you. And will it still be of amino acids 421-560?
I think so. I don't see anything in the rules that mentions it being different at different levels of competition.
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Re: Protein Modeling C

Postby fozendog » February 23rd, 2015, 12:22 am

Is a pre-build of restriction endonuclease foki necessary for all levels of competition (regional, state, national)?
Gah, Bernard stays up late and answered it.
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Events: Protein Modeling, Cell Biology, Disease Detectives, Experimental Design, Dynamic Planet, Water Quality

bernard
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Re: Protein Modeling C

Postby bernard » February 23rd, 2015, 12:23 am

Is a pre-build of restriction endonuclease foki necessary for all levels of competition (regional, state, national)?
Gah, Bernard stays up late and answered it.
And Bernard stays up late and responds!
"One of the ways that I believe people express their appreciation to the rest of humanity is to make something wonderful and put it out there."

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Re: Protein Modeling C

Postby Chemchic » February 25th, 2015, 9:05 am


Also, is there a way to get cheaper materials for the pre-build model than the 24$ one on the website?
I'd like to keep that snazzy tuber thing. c:
Here is an interesting material that we REALLY like to use for this event. It is sturdy, and fairly easy to work with:

http://www.niteize.com/product/Gear-Tie-64.asp

You will have to figure out how to connect several of them together to be long enough- but we really like them. They have them at Home Depot if you want to take a look at them. Is it collectively going to be cheaper than the Tubers? Well, the shipping from 3D molecular designs is really pricey, so if you purchase at Home Depot it might save some bucks.
I just ordered from Amazon. 2-32" (4 tot in pkgs) ties for ~11.50 (used free shping of Prime). Got the lime green and might use the lime green duct tape for the joins. I hated the shipping charges for a piddly, trashed, manila envelope from a few years ago...where 3D Molecular Designs charges $18 shipping and $28 for a single long toober!!!...so I refuse to buy from them. As long as items are properly marked, it shouldn't matter from what material the backbone is made.

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Re: Protein Modeling C

Postby JonB » February 25th, 2015, 9:34 am

Agreed. We have used these in all of our proteins. They look pretty good and are fairly easy to work with. They can be painted and glued fairly easily. If you have the capability, create 3D printed joints to connect them together (basically like a sleeve that both ends of the "protein" can slide into).

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Re: Protein Modeling C

Postby bernard » February 25th, 2015, 9:47 am

Agreed. We have used these in all of our proteins. They look pretty good and are fairly easy to work with. They can be painted and glued fairly easily. If you have the capability, create 3D printed joints to connect them together (basically like a sleeve that both ends of the "protein" can slide into).
Would you happen to know the name of the product Chemchic is referring to in this reply? I am thinking about getting some materials for our team to practice with for the onsite build. Do those materials work just like MiniToobers, which by my understanding are very commonly used for the onsite build?
"One of the ways that I believe people express their appreciation to the rest of humanity is to make something wonderful and put it out there."

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Re: Protein Modeling C

Postby JonB » February 25th, 2015, 10:28 am

Agreed. We have used these in all of our proteins. They look pretty good and are fairly easy to work with. They can be painted and glued fairly easily. If you have the capability, create 3D printed joints to connect them together (basically like a sleeve that both ends of the "protein" can slide into).
Would you happen to know the name of the product Chemchic is referring to in this reply? I am thinking about getting some materials for our team to practice with for the onsite build. Do those materials work just like MiniToobers, which by my understanding are very commonly used for the onsite build?

http://www.niteize.com/product/Gear-Tie-64.asp

It would work well for practice.

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Re: Protein Modeling C

Postby bernard » February 25th, 2015, 10:30 am

Agreed. We have used these in all of our proteins. They look pretty good and are fairly easy to work with. They can be painted and glued fairly easily. If you have the capability, create 3D printed joints to connect them together (basically like a sleeve that both ends of the "protein" can slide into).
Would you happen to know the name of the product Chemchic is referring to in this reply? I am thinking about getting some materials for our team to practice with for the onsite build. Do those materials work just like MiniToobers, which by my understanding are very commonly used for the onsite build?

http://www.niteize.com/product/Gear-Tie-64.asp

It would work well for practice.
Are they as rigid as copper wire or MiniToobers? Can they be written on with permanent marker?
"One of the ways that I believe people express their appreciation to the rest of humanity is to make something wonderful and put it out there."


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