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Re: Experimental Design B/C

Posted: March 13th, 2015, 5:19 am
by Skink
I think it's clear enough, but, so it's not 'my word versus theirs', let's link together the scoring rubric with the scoring explanation. The answer will be clear.

Suggestions for improvement of specific experiment are given
Suggestion for other ways to look at hypothesis given
Suggestions for future experiments given
Practical application(s) of experiment given

Add in the points from the scoring explanation with the sections in which they fit.

Suggestions for improvement of specific experiment are given
-Give at least one suggestion to improve the particular experiment you did (Other than we need better equipment or more time)
Suggestion for other ways to look at hypothesis given
-List another possible experiment to examine your same hypothesis
Suggestions for future experiments given
-Give at least one suggestion for a future related experiment
Practical application(s) of experiment given
-Give at least one practical application for the specific experiment done

It's unambiguous, then, that the alumnus was incorrect (or, at least, that the vast majority of event supervisors will score as you'd normally expect, anyway). What you were told is sort of, well, wildly different! Plus, I'm not really sure under what circumstances we'd ever stop to think about different hypotheses that our data set could address. That's unusual. So, yes, I'm confident that the 'easy' way is, also, the correct way. As a side remark, precedence is not a meaningful force in Science Olympiad. Just because an invitational event supervisor scored you one way does not suggest that it will recur!

Re: Experimental Design B/C

Posted: April 16th, 2015, 6:45 pm
by XJcwolfyX
For qualitative observations, how do you observations about results not directly related to the DV?

Re: Experimental Design B/C

Posted: April 16th, 2015, 11:14 pm
by jkang
For qualitative observations, how do you observations about results not directly related to the DV?
An easy example of doing this is the Div. C experiment at Wright State (mixing baking soda with vinegar). My group's hypothesis was pretty simple: if you add more baking soda to a given amount of vinegar in a beaker, then you'll see a larger volume increase of a balloon that is covering the beaker. For this experiment, observations can be things such as: "volume of balloon increased quickly at first, and slowed down as the reaction progressed," "balloon expanded to point of being firm, stayed that way for ___ seconds," or just general observations about what happened in the experiment that aren't necessarily quantitative. Another good example is if you're doing chemical reactions, observations can be things like "precipitate formed," "solution turned into ___ color," and so on.

Re: Experimental Design B/C

Posted: April 17th, 2015, 7:29 am
by XJcwolfyX
Great, thank you!

But what if you were doing a physically experiment, like rolling a ball down a ramp or something with a parachute?

Re: Experimental Design B/C

Posted: April 17th, 2015, 2:27 pm
by samlan16
Great, thank you!

But what if you were doing a physically experiment, like rolling a ball down a ramp or something with a parachute?
It could be something as arbitrary as "the parachute was made out of white tissues" or "we were standing next to a table". That usually works.

Re: Experimental Design B/C

Posted: April 17th, 2015, 5:34 pm
by XJcwolfyX
But how is that about the results?

Re: Experimental Design B/C

Posted: April 17th, 2015, 5:45 pm
by UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F
But how is that about the results?
I'm not in Experimental Design, but I'm in 6th grade science, so... somewhat similar in terms of the experiments.

Maybe "the ball rolled faster on the steeper ramp" or "the parachute dramatically slowed the descent down."

Re: Experimental Design B/C

Posted: April 18th, 2015, 11:00 am
by samlan16
But how is that about the results?
Okay. so as you know this is what the rubric says about qualitative observations:
g. Qualitative Observations (8 points)
_____ Observations about results given
_____ Observations about procedure/deviations
_____ Observations about results not directly relating to
Dependent Variable
_____ Observations given throughout the course of the
experiment
Clearly DV observations fall under the first criterion and experimental errors under the second. Here's the thing: your results directly involving your experimental apparatus will all involve the DV, so you need to find indirect results resulting from the IV. For example, if you are doing a coordination experiment in which a subject is spinning and then has to do a task like throwing a ball, a direct result would be that the subject struggled with throwing the ball, and an indirect result would be that he or she reported a feeling of dizziness. (Use that with caution.) If you are doing a parachute experiment testing parachute size on drop time, then any differences in the type of paper could qualify depending on how you operationally define your IV (especially if you must use different parachutes for each level. Note that this would not fall under the second criterion because you would have specified in the procedure the necessity for n different parachutes, and that would not be a deviation.)

Alternatively, you could evaluate other variables that could be DVs in other experiments. In the parachute experiment, another DV that could be used is (this is a stretch) tension in the string. You could report that the string appears to be variably strained by the weight attached depending on the parachute used.

Re: Experimental Design B/C

Posted: April 22nd, 2015, 5:27 am
by JonB
Anyone have any super-creative Exp Designs in recent tournaments that they would like to share? As a coach, I am running out of new ideas...

Thanks!

Re: Experimental Design B/C

Posted: April 22nd, 2015, 7:30 am
by bernard
Anyone have any super-creative Exp Designs in recent tournaments that they would like to share? As a coach, I am running out of new ideas...

Thanks!
I'm not on this event, but from what our students have told me, at our state tournament the topic was turbulence and students were given balloons, string, paper, paperclips. That's all I remember from the materials.

I thought the MIT Experimental Design prompt was creative. Our students designed an experiment on parallax for it.

Re: Experimental Design B/C

Posted: April 22nd, 2015, 8:38 am
by watermydoing14
Anyone have any super-creative Exp Designs in recent tournaments that they would like to share? As a coach, I am running out of new ideas...

Thanks!
I'm not on this event, but from what our students have told me, at our state tournament the topic was turbulence and students were given balloons, string, paper, paperclips. That's all I remember from the materials.

I thought the MIT Experimental Design prompt was creative. Our students designed an experiment on parallax for it.
I was on this event at state, we also got coffee stirrers and I think popsicle sticks. I'm not entirely sure how the event supervisors scored it, but I suspect that many teams were tiered because their experiment was not related to turbulence. Our team didn't know how to define turbulence, so we just did our best and tested something to do with air resistance. Practicing with this set of materials is a good exercise in making sure that the experiment relates to the topic, because if it doesn't, then you basically have no chance of placing well.

Re: Experimental Design B/C

Posted: April 22nd, 2015, 5:18 pm
by Panda Weasley
Anyone have any super-creative Exp Designs in recent tournaments that they would like to share? As a coach, I am running out of new ideas...

Thanks!
My 2 favorite experiments that I have done haven't necessarily been hard, but they have been creative and fun. One involved gummy bears and making a device to project them, and the other involved testing the rebound hight with different bungie cords and barbie dolls. For the gummy bear one we were given: gummy bears, popsicle sticks, rubber bands, a small cup, and measuring devices. For the bungie cord one we were given: a variety of bungie cords (different types, not lengths), a barbie doll, tape, and measuring devices. If these sound like what you were looking for feel free to PM me for more specific details.

My regional test this year was harder, and defiantly made us think. I'm not sure if you could call it creative though.
It was this years Regionals test and they asked us to do "something related to sample accuracy", but it was phrased in a more confusing way. We were given a Styrofoam plate, 208 red beads, and 75 white beads. What we did was we made an experiment that was to the best of our knowledge related to sample accuracy and tested that.

Re: Experimental Design B/C

Posted: April 23rd, 2015, 4:52 am
by samlan16
Anyone have any super-creative Exp Designs in recent tournaments that they would like to share? As a coach, I am running out of new ideas...

Thanks!
PM me if you want the specific details, but I got an experiment testing for impulse by dropping eggs.

Re: Experimental Design B/C

Posted: April 23rd, 2015, 8:35 am
by jkang
I thought the MIT Experimental Design prompt was creative. Our students designed an experiment on parallax for it.
Seems like a much more legit experiment than what we had LOL

Re: Experimental Design B/C

Posted: April 23rd, 2015, 8:39 am
by bernard
I thought the MIT Experimental Design prompt was creative. Our students designed an experiment on parallax for it.
Seems like a much more legit experiment than what we had LOL
Would you mind sharing what you did?