Dynamic Planet B/C

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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby Watergirl » December 31st, 2014, 5:02 pm

JT016 wrote:
John Richardsim wrote:
JT016 wrote:How would I go about solving a question like this:
"You are studying the sediment layers in an abyssal plain. If the sound is picked up by the receiver 5.92 seconds after leaving the source, how deep is the water? Assume the sound is travelling close to its maximum rate in water."
Would I use 1560 m/s as the speed of sound (found HERE)? If so , would I get 9235.2m deep?

Uh, don't forget that the sound has to travel back to the receiver after reaching the bottom, so you need to cut the time in half.

Good thing I asked. I forgot to do that. Thanks :P
So 4617.6m

Just asking. How did you determine that you had to use 1560m/s as the speed of sound for this equation? I thought the speed of sound was supposed to be 1500 m/s.
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby John Richardsim » January 1st, 2015, 9:16 am

Watergirl wrote:
JT016 wrote:How would I go about solving a question like this:
"You are studying the sediment layers in an abyssal plain. If the sound is picked up by the receiver 5.92 seconds after leaving the source, how deep is the water? Assume the sound is travelling close to its maximum rate in water."
Would I use 1560 m/s as the speed of sound (found HERE)? If so , would I get 9235.2m deep?

Just asking. How did you determine that you had to use 1560m/s as the speed of sound for this equation? I thought the speed of sound was supposed to be 1500 m/s.

They got 1560 m/s in the speed of sound in seawater section of that Wikipedia article (according to the section above it, the speed of sound in freshwater is almost 1500 m/s). However, the speed of sound in seawater will vary depending mainly on temperature, salinity, and pressure, each of which varies with depth. The figure of 1560 m/s in the text does not address any of those factors, so I would be skeptical about putting it in my notes at all. I personally think most tests would give the specific speed it wants you to use, which would probably be something along the lines of "Assuming an average speed of sound of _____..."
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby SOnerd » January 1st, 2015, 10:00 am

azuritemalachite wrote:
SOnerd wrote:Does anyone know what we have to know about topographic maps?
I've studied stuff like contour lines and stuff. Is there anything else?

Last year with glaciers you had to identify features on a topographic map so the testmakers should have atleast something about sediments and sea-floor features.

I found some stuff involving bathymetric maps, which could be on a test..
https://www.google.com/search?q=bathymetric+maps&biw=1366&bih=643&source=lnms&sa=X&ei=sYmlVN_QIsiqNoyag8gE&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAA#q=bathymetric+maps+how+to+read
(Click on the second hit, I'm not sure how to upload word docs on here)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bathymetric_chart
http://www.ehow.com/how_5087879_read-depth-height-bathymetric-contours.html
EDIT- Do you guys know what sorts of questions will be asked about maps?
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby sscharter » January 2nd, 2015, 1:12 pm

Hey,
So this is my first time doing this event and I was wondering what is the best way to go about studying...
I have a textbook and I am taking notes on all the information, but would that be enough? Is this the first year the event is using those NGSS practices?

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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby John Richardsim » January 2nd, 2015, 3:11 pm

sscharter wrote:Hey,
So this is my first time doing this event and I was wondering what is the best way to go about studying...
I have a textbook and I am taking notes on all the information, but would that be enough? Is this the first year the event is using those NGSS practices?

Yeah, textbooks are a good way to go (most of the studying I've done so far has been from a textbook). In addition to textbooks, look around the web for stuff. A couple of other good starting places are the NOAA Resources and NOAA Oceans and Coasts.
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby JT016 » January 2nd, 2015, 3:17 pm

John Richardsim wrote:
Watergirl wrote:
JT016 wrote:

Just asking. How did you determine that you had to use 1560m/s as the speed of sound for this equation? I thought the speed of sound was supposed to be 1500 m/s.

They got 1560 m/s in the speed of sound in seawater section of that Wikipedia article (according to the section above it, the speed of sound in freshwater is almost 1500 m/s). However, the speed of sound in seawater will vary depending mainly on temperature, salinity, and pressure, each of which varies with depth. The figure of 1560 m/s in the text does not address any of those factors, so I would be skeptical about putting it in my notes at all. I personally think most tests would give the specific speed it wants you to use, which would probably be something along the lines of "Assuming an average speed of sound of _____..."

I wasn't really sure what to use, and I dont have an answer key so that also doesn't help me. But I figured I'd use 1560m/s as it was the only speed I found.

sscharter wrote:Hey,
So this is my first time doing this event and I was wondering what is the best way to go about studying...
I have a textbook and I am taking notes on all the information, but would that be enough? Is this the first year the event is using those NGSS practices?

You definitely wanna look up each of the different bullets in the rules packet. (I often use Wikipedia for info, although some may argue with its reliability. A university professor's website may sometimes have good info you can find that). Also, diagrams are extremely helpful. You have 4 sheets so you should be able to put a lot of diagrams. Occasionally you may end up having a diagram on the test that is the exact one in your notes, and it makes those questions rather easy. Random facts (e.g. what is the deepest part of the ocean? The Challenger Deep in the Mariana Trench) can also be important. After you do that, I'd say take practice tests. There are 2 under "Test Exchange" and I'd suggest taking both. If you don't know something look it up, and put it in your note sheets.

If you wanna know how to organize your note sheets, that's a different question, but this is on the information you should have.

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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby SOnerd » January 3rd, 2015, 12:10 pm

John Richardsim wrote:
sscharter wrote:Hey,
So this is my first time doing this event and I was wondering what is the best way to go about studying...
I have a textbook and I am taking notes on all the information, but would that be enough? Is this the first year the event is using those NGSS practices?

Yeah, textbooks are a good way to go (most of the studying I've done so far has been from a textbook). In addition to textbooks, look around the web for stuff. A couple of other good starting places are the NOAA Resources and NOAA Oceans and Coasts.

I've used a lot of web stuff so far. My partner and I have ordered the textbook from Amazon, but it hasn't been delivered yet.
If you're looking for links by topic, you could try clicking the link on this webpage: http://soinc.org/dynamic_planet_b that says "List of Web Links for 2015 Dynamic Planet". It has a word doc with a bunch of good websites.
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby JT016 » January 7th, 2015, 4:04 pm

Salinity:
I know the oceans near the equator are more saline due to increased evaporation and the lack of glaciers provide fresh water, but are there any other important reasons I'm missing? Also, are there any specific areas that would be good to know, in terms of salinity? I read HEREthat the salinity of the Batlic Sea is about 10ppt. Would that be good to know? If so, are there other places like the Baltic Sea (or areas that are really saline)?

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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby John Richardsim » January 7th, 2015, 6:11 pm

JT016 wrote:Salinity:
I know the oceans near the equator are more saline due to increased evaporation and the lack of glaciers provide fresh water, but are there any other important reasons I'm missing?

Well, input of freshwater will also decrease salinity in places, but it can be quite variable (for example, the ITCZ fluctuates in latitude throughout the year, so evaporation is still the primary determinant of salinity at the equator).
JT016 wrote:Also, are there any specific areas that would be good to know, in terms of salinity? I read HEREthat the salinity of the Baltic Sea is about 10ppt. Would that be good to know? If so, are there other places like the Baltic Sea (or areas that are really saline)?

Well, it certainly can't hurt to know things like that, although from my understanding tests should focus more on WHY an area like the Baltic Sea has such a low salinity, or why an area with a very high salinity has a high salinity (the key word in this sentence is should; I certainly can't guarantee that every test you come across will be written with this mind-set).
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby bobbuilder » January 8th, 2015, 8:50 am

do you need to know a lot of mathematical equation. And are you allowed to bring anything in other than a pencil, calculator and 4 pages of cheat sheet

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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby Unome » January 8th, 2015, 2:07 pm

bobbuilder wrote:do you need to know a lot of mathematical equation. And are you allowed to bring anything in other than a pencil, calculator and 4 pages of cheat sheet

Most supervisors will probably allow you to bring an eraser and a handheld pencil sharpener (although it's better to just bring 3 pencils per person). As for math, you could check the test exchange to see what the tests could be like.
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby azuritemalachite » January 8th, 2015, 3:55 pm

Unome wrote:
bobbuilder wrote:do you need to know a lot of mathematical equation. And are you allowed to bring anything in other than a pencil, calculator and 4 pages of cheat sheet

Most supervisors will probably allow you to bring an eraser and a handheld pencil sharpener (although it's better to just bring 3 pencils per person). As for math, you could check the test exchange to see what the tests could be like.

Not a good idea. There aren't many tests available, but any Oceanography exams will do the same. Proctors allow pencils and erasers. A good idea is to use mechanical or just bring a ton of pencils. Make sure the cheat-sheets are front and back. It is very very good idea to remember or write down as many math equations pertaining with oceanography so any math question encountered will be a breeze. Also if available use a graphing calculator.
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby rockster » January 9th, 2015, 3:38 pm

I'm having a lot of trouble finding something for wave height because most of what I find is predictions... I'm just a mess trying to do this event, and my tournament is only three weeks away... I don't want to let my partner down, can someone please help, I'm desperate :?: :oops: :oops:
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby SOnerd » January 10th, 2015, 1:59 pm

I'm currently making my cheat-sheet, and I'm on the Representative Activities.
For the one that says to: "Identify topographic features of ocean regions using seafloor maps", I was thinking of adding what each feature looks like on a bathymetric map. Do you guys know where I could find pics of each (on a bathymetric map)?
For example, this would be guyot
Image

And this would be seamount
Image

So far, I've only found those two.
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby azuritemalachite » January 10th, 2015, 7:09 pm

Hi! :D It's me again to help you with your questions! :)
rockster wrote:I'm having a lot of trouble finding something for wave height because most of what I find is predictions... I'm just a mess trying to do this event, and my tournament is only three weeks away... I don't want to let my partner down, can someone please help, I'm desperate :?: :oops: :oops:

So someone's confused here... To find wave height (wavelength and wave period, too...) you need to know wind speed (or time for tides), length of time the wind has blown and fetch (the distance that the wind traveled across open water). You need a formula to get the wave height for a specific wave so all will predictions unless you have some way to actually measure the wave height.
For a an approx. height/period for a type of wave use a chart like this:
Image


SOnerd wrote:I'm currently making my cheat-sheet, and I'm on the Representative Activities.
For the one that says to: "Identify topographic features of ocean regions using seafloor maps", I was thinking of adding what each feature looks like on a bathymetric map. Do you guys know where I could find pics of each (on a bathymetric map)?
For example, this would be guyot
Image

And this would be seamount
Image

So far, I've only found those two.


Well for help on the cheatsheet, charts and diagrams help the most, then vocabulary/terms with descriptions. Luckily I found the time and put some effort and made this diagram on how to detect seafloor features using all sort of maps.
This will also be on the wiki to look at for future references:
Image

Also contour maps:
Image but go to the DP wiki for more info because I add a description there.
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