Crave the Wave B

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Re: Crave the Wave B

Post by RontgensWallaby » May 18th, 2015, 3:06 pm

sciolycoach wrote:First of all, thank you to all of you who competed in Crave the Wave this past weekend in Nebraska. I thoroughly enjoyed preparing, proctoring, and scoring the event and was very encouraged by the score distribution. Here are some GENERAL statistics (no information about specific teams will be released or provided by me, and you can get a copy of the test and key next fall on the test CD available for purchase from the national office)

The test was set up in 12 + 1 stations (one was done with all groups before the station work began). Students were given 4 minutes per station, which cut everything pretty close. There were a total of 159 points possible on the test. The stations included lab practical activities, other hands-on activities, conceptual questions, mathematics applications questions, and other application questions. I tried to make the test challenging but fair, and I was very pleased with the score distribution.

The high score was a 127.
The mean score was an 83.
The median score was a 90.
25% of the teams scored at least a 99
75% of the teams scored at least a 59
All of the teams scored at least a 25

The most difficult stations (by far) were the two earthquake stations; I suspect the students did not have enough time for those two stations, and while I suspected that may occur going in, I wanted to separate the teams. The top teams were able to plow through those stations, while others left them blank.

I am providing these statistics out of the "goodness of my heart" and I would NOT expect statistics like these from any other event supervisors. As a former SO student myself (but one who never was on a national-qualifying team) and a current coach (again, team has never qualified for nationals) I can understand the curiosity that many of you who competed may have, but I cannot release any more information.

I was particularly impressed with the very high level of sportsmanship I saw all day, including students loaning writing tools, being friendly to myself and others, and kids genuinely trying their best. You all should be very proud of your performance on Saturday, regardless of how the results ended up.

Again, it was my honor supervising this event and, as always, you student competitors surpassed my expectations and did quite well. Congratulations to all students on another very successful season! I hope everyone had fun and had a great experience, and I look forward to the opportunities and challenges that 2015-2016 will bring!

Andy Hamm
Crave the Wave 2015 National Event Supervisor
Yeah, I was thoroughly impressed by the test; however, I was surprised that tsunamis, breaking ocean waves, and sound (besides the Doppler effect) were left out. I actually also agree that a station format is a very good way to separate top teams and show who had prepared for those types of questions, as the stress factor led me to forget to do the last step in my calculations at the seismic stations (however I was able to find what I thought to be the magnitude later on).
I'll probably make a public practice test myself next year, as I won't be competing.
Every great and deep difficulty bears in itself its own solution. It forces us to change our thinking in order to find it. - Niels Bohr

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Re: Crave the Wave B

Post by Unome » May 18th, 2015, 3:23 pm

RontgensWallaby wrote:
sciolycoach wrote:First of all, thank you to all of you who competed in Crave the Wave this past weekend in Nebraska. I thoroughly enjoyed preparing, proctoring, and scoring the event and was very encouraged by the score distribution. Here are some GENERAL statistics (no information about specific teams will be released or provided by me, and you can get a copy of the test and key next fall on the test CD available for purchase from the national office)

The test was set up in 12 + 1 stations (one was done with all groups before the station work began). Students were given 4 minutes per station, which cut everything pretty close. There were a total of 159 points possible on the test. The stations included lab practical activities, other hands-on activities, conceptual questions, mathematics applications questions, and other application questions. I tried to make the test challenging but fair, and I was very pleased with the score distribution.

The high score was a 127.
The mean score was an 83.
The median score was a 90.
25% of the teams scored at least a 99
75% of the teams scored at least a 59
All of the teams scored at least a 25

The most difficult stations (by far) were the two earthquake stations; I suspect the students did not have enough time for those two stations, and while I suspected that may occur going in, I wanted to separate the teams. The top teams were able to plow through those stations, while others left them blank.

I am providing these statistics out of the "goodness of my heart" and I would NOT expect statistics like these from any other event supervisors. As a former SO student myself (but one who never was on a national-qualifying team) and a current coach (again, team has never qualified for nationals) I can understand the curiosity that many of you who competed may have, but I cannot release any more information.

I was particularly impressed with the very high level of sportsmanship I saw all day, including students loaning writing tools, being friendly to myself and others, and kids genuinely trying their best. You all should be very proud of your performance on Saturday, regardless of how the results ended up.

Again, it was my honor supervising this event and, as always, you student competitors surpassed my expectations and did quite well. Congratulations to all students on another very successful season! I hope everyone had fun and had a great experience, and I look forward to the opportunities and challenges that 2015-2016 will bring!

Andy Hamm
Crave the Wave 2015 National Event Supervisor
Yeah, I was thoroughly impressed by the test; however, I was surprised that tsunamis, breaking ocean waves, and sound (besides the Doppler effect) were left out. I actually also agree that a station format is a very good way to separate top teams and show who had prepared for those types of questions, as the stress factor led me to forget to do the last step in my calculations at the seismic stations (however I was able to find what I thought to be the magnitude later on).
I'll probably make a public practice test myself next year, as I won't be competing.
Since you've only been here for a month, I'll direct you to this thread, which will hopefully be returning again this year; it's a great place to submit practice tests.
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Re: Crave the Wave B

Post by awesome90220 » May 19th, 2015, 5:06 am

RontgensWallaby wrote:
sciolycoach wrote:First of all, thank you to all of you who competed in Crave the Wave this past weekend in Nebraska. I thoroughly enjoyed preparing, proctoring, and scoring the event and was very encouraged by the score distribution. Here are some GENERAL statistics (no information about specific teams will be released or provided by me, and you can get a copy of the test and key next fall on the test CD available for purchase from the national office)

The test was set up in 12 + 1 stations (one was done with all groups before the station work began). Students were given 4 minutes per station, which cut everything pretty close. There were a total of 159 points possible on the test. The stations included lab practical activities, other hands-on activities, conceptual questions, mathematics applications questions, and other application questions. I tried to make the test challenging but fair, and I was very pleased with the score distribution.

The high score was a 127.
The mean score was an 83.
The median score was a 90.
25% of the teams scored at least a 99
75% of the teams scored at least a 59
All of the teams scored at least a 25

The most difficult stations (by far) were the two earthquake stations; I suspect the students did not have enough time for those two stations, and while I suspected that may occur going in, I wanted to separate the teams. The top teams were able to plow through those stations, while others left them blank.

I am providing these statistics out of the "goodness of my heart" and I would NOT expect statistics like these from any other event supervisors. As a former SO student myself (but one who never was on a national-qualifying team) and a current coach (again, team has never qualified for nationals) I can understand the curiosity that many of you who competed may have, but I cannot release any more information.

I was particularly impressed with the very high level of sportsmanship I saw all day, including students loaning writing tools, being friendly to myself and others, and kids genuinely trying their best. You all should be very proud of your performance on Saturday, regardless of how the results ended up.

Again, it was my honor supervising this event and, as always, you student competitors surpassed my expectations and did quite well. Congratulations to all students on another very successful season! I hope everyone had fun and had a great experience, and I look forward to the opportunities and challenges that 2015-2016 will bring!

Andy Hamm
Crave the Wave 2015 National Event Supervisor
Yeah, I was thoroughly impressed by the test; however, I was surprised that tsunamis, breaking ocean waves, and sound (besides the Doppler effect) were left out. I actually also agree that a station format is a very good way to separate top teams and show who had prepared for those types of questions, as the stress factor led me to forget to do the last step in my calculations at the seismic stations (however I was able to find what I thought to be the magnitude later on).
I'll probably make a public practice test myself next year, as I won't be competing.
I think this means you're a 9th grader RontgensWallaby? If this is so, then we're living the same struggle. How are you coping with it? I could be doing better, but its better now. I think you saw me simultaneously walking and crying around the outer rim of the arena after B division award ceremony.

Going on to actual comment stuff, why isn't there a C division event similar to Crave the Wave?
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Re: Crave the Wave B

Post by arifislam » May 19th, 2015, 5:40 am

Excellent conversation. all the best post.

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Re: Crave the Wave B

Post by chalker » May 19th, 2015, 6:15 am

awesome90220 wrote: Going on to actual comment stuff, why isn't there a C division event similar to Crave the Wave?
There is: It's About Time. At one point we considered calling Crave the Wave "It's About Frequency", but decided against that. The 2 events are somewhat designed to go together.

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Re: Crave the Wave B

Post by syo_astro » May 19th, 2015, 1:13 pm

chalker wrote:
awesome90220 wrote: Going on to actual comment stuff, why isn't there a C division event similar to Crave the Wave?
There is: It's About Time. At one point we considered calling Crave the Wave "It's About Frequency", but decided against that. The 2 events are somewhat designed to go together.
Wow, this gives me great allowance over ideas that I was debating putting in for test making if I need to make any... Thanks! :D

Also yes, It's About Time is a far better name, good decision. Yes, a compliment, I know those sadly seem to not be coming up frequently on these forums >.>.
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Re: Crave the Wave B

Post by RontgensWallaby » May 19th, 2015, 4:29 pm

awesome90220 wrote: I think this means you're a 9th grader RontgensWallaby? If this is so, then we're living the same struggle. How are you coping with it? I could be doing better, but its better now. I think you saw me simultaneously walking and crying around the outer rim of the arena after B division award ceremony.

Going on to actual comment stuff, why isn't there a C division event similar to Crave the Wave?
I'm not a ninth grader, but an 8th grader (as is my partner). But our team doesn't really use 9th graders and I'm not returning as my 8th grade year is saturated with really smart people, of whom none are returning. As for my emotions after this, I'm really disappointed that I couldn't meet my goal for Crave, but as a whole I try to prevent expressing such disappointment...

Like chalker was saying, It's About Time is pretty closely related to waves, but some of the questions are independent. I appreciate there being relativity, as it's basically based upon the fact that the speed of light is constant for all observers. Maybe to complicate things next year they could introduce a bit of quantum mechanics or particle physics into a different event? ;)
Every great and deep difficulty bears in itself its own solution. It forces us to change our thinking in order to find it. - Niels Bohr

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Re: Crave the Wave B

Post by ampy1234567 » August 4th, 2015, 8:46 am

Does anyone know any online resources about seismic waves? As far as I can tell they aren't covered that much in physicsclassroom and the hyperphysics one seems a little bit brief (maybe it's enough, but I don't know because I couldn't compete; my school doesn't let 6th graders join). Thanks in advance! :)
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Re: Crave the Wave B

Post by John Richardsim » August 4th, 2015, 12:23 pm

ampy1234567 wrote:Does anyone know any online resources about seismic waves? As far as I can tell they aren't covered that much in physicsclassroom and the hyperphysics one seems a little bit brief (maybe it's enough, but I don't know because I couldn't compete; my school doesn't let 6th graders join). Thanks in advance! :)
In the tests I've taken, I've only seen questions asking about body waves (p- and s-waves) and surface waves (with rayleigh and love waves being the only two asked about). In addition to basic questions about what they are, I've also seen questions more geared towards how they behave (the main concept with this is "what are the p- and s-wave shadow zones and how and why do they form?"). For this stuff, I would recommend just looking it up on wikipedia (although, I never really looked around very much, so there could also be many more useful resources I haven't seen).

Last year on the Michigan state test, there was a section in which we had to sketch and label a diagram very similar to this one: http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-OyPHzu0wpB8/T ... _p_s-1.gif

Oh, and that reminds me: also make sure you can find the epicenter of an earthquake by using the triangulation method (a helpful video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TBss68oBmmk and an interactive online activity with it: http://www.sciencecourseware.com/virtua ... ecute.html (later in that activity it goes into how to find the magnitude of an earthquake; this is also important to know)). And yes, both finding the epicenter and finding the magnitude were problems on last year's nationals test.
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