Designs

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Re: Designs

Post by Phys1cs » November 24th, 2014, 4:21 am

SWAnG wrote:Since the ETS is initiated by the process of the golf ball moving upwards, does that mean that during the process the golf ball can trigger an ETS and that while the ETS is going the golf ball may still be making it's way to the jug?

Also, do all balls have to start underneath the jug or do they just have to end up lower than the jug at one point in time?
I believe you can still have the golf ball falling into the jug when the next sequence is started, so long as t he thing triggering the next step is also making the ball fall.

The golf balls must start entirely underneath the jug before going into the jug. So make sure your lowest jug is tall enough to allow for a golf ball to be under it!

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Re: Designs

Post by SWAnG » November 25th, 2014, 8:59 am

I remember last year you could turn off your motors with another task so they didn't have to run throughout the whole time. Can we do this again without having it count as a parallel task? (turning off the motor doesn't contribute to any ETS). Example: Motor pulls a toothpick and triggers part of the ETS, later the toothpick hits a end stop which stops the motor.

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Re: Designs

Post by themaker » November 25th, 2014, 5:47 pm

I don't see why you wouldn't be able to have something switch off a previously used motor. It's been allowed every year so it probably is allowed this year. I don't actually see why you would bother switch off a motor though. I usually leave them on and turn them off at the end of the run.

Can anything involving the golfball be counted as an energy form for a transfer? According to rule 4.b, the golfball cannot be counted as an energy form. So in that case, would this not count as an ETS: golfball hits switch to turn on motor that lifts another golfball (M-E-M)? This makes the movement of the golfball hitting the switch mechanical energy. (of course it can also be argued that since the switch moved, thats mechanical part in the ETS).

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Re: Designs

Post by SWAnG » November 30th, 2014, 11:11 am

hmm i avoided that by having the golfball hit something that then activated a switch (M-M-E) this way the golfball's mechanical energy is converted into another form of mechanical energy that I'm assuming can be counted as part of the ETS.

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Re: Designs

Post by SWAnG » December 4th, 2014, 5:35 am

Can you have a golf ball roll over two switches consecutively, the first one turning on a motor that lifts it (don't want or need points for this) and the other that causes the ETS. Or is that considered parallel tasks? Do I need the first switch to result in the lifting motor and the ETS.

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Re: Designs

Post by bernard » December 4th, 2014, 8:40 am

SWAnG wrote:Can you have a golf ball roll over two switches consecutively, the first one turning on a motor that lifts it (don't want or need points for this) and the other that causes the ETS. Or is that considered parallel tasks? Do I need the first switch to result in the lifting motor and the ETS.
Mission Possible wrote:Parallel transfers are not measured in a chronologic manner but in a causality manner. That is to say, if one transfer causes the next transfer, then they are not parallel.

Parallel transfers have no direct relationship to one another and if one of the two transfers fail, the overall sequence of events can still continue or lead to a “dead-end” path.
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Re: Designs

Post by SpartanOlympians » December 6th, 2014, 12:42 pm

Does the final golf ball to activate the buzzer have to be dropped into a scoring jug? Also, if it doesn't, then am I correct in assuming that if the final golf ball doesn't drop into a scoring jug but activates a buzzer, the 250 pts for the final task will still be given?
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Re: Designs

Post by Phys1cs » December 6th, 2014, 2:19 pm

SpartanOlympians wrote:Does the final golf ball to activate the buzzer have to be dropped into a scoring jug? Also, if it doesn't, then am I correct in assuming that if the final golf ball doesn't drop into a scoring jug but activates a buzzer, the 250 pts for the final task will still be given?
It seems so. The rules only make mention of it counting for points if it ends in a jug, so it doesn't seem that it must.

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Re: Designs

Post by bernard » December 7th, 2014, 10:37 am

Be sure to check the FAQs regarding Mission Possible on the official Science Olympiad website! Though the rules do not explicitly describe the features of a container that make it a jug, it is clearly stated in an FAQ. A lot of the teams at our invitational yesterday used soda/pop bottles, which unfortunately did not count as jugs.
Science Olympiad wrote:What is your definition of jug? (section: 4 / paragraph: 1 / line: 4-5)
We will be using the Merriam-Webster dictionary definition of a jug: "A large, deep container with a narrow opening and a handle." Per the rules, the jug must be made of plastic and also have been used for a beverage. Specific size of the jug is not defined.
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Re: Designs

Post by themaker » December 7th, 2014, 12:17 pm

Science Olympiad wrote:
What is your definition of jug? (section: 4 / paragraph: 1 / line: 4-5)
We will be using the Merriam-Webster dictionary definition of a jug: "A large, deep container with a narrow opening and a handle." Per the rules, the jug must be made of plastic and also have been used for a beverage. Specific size of the jug is not defined.
That is a very strange definition. I don't see why a handle would be necessary. I mean, as long as the sides are above 10 cm what difference would a handle make?

Using a milk jug as an example, the handle is attached near the small opening at its top. The rules state that the jug can be cut to enlarge its opening as long as the sides are above 10 cm. A golfball doesn't even fit into the opening of a uncut jug, and cutting it would remove part or all of the handle.

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