Fossils B/C

varunscs11
Member
Member
Posts: 163
Joined: March 14th, 2015, 9:02 pm
Division: Grad
State: PA

Re: Fossils B/C

Postby varunscs11 » May 2nd, 2015, 2:23 pm

This is better right....
photo (1).JPG
photo (1).JPG (26.24 KiB) Viewed 2017 times
Phylum
Class
Genus
Mode of Preservation
This mode of preservation is equivalent to what in Mineralogy?
With this type of mode of preservation can you see the fossils without something (nature, humans) altering it?
Why is this genus shaped the way it is
Time Range
Describe the hinge line
Where do/did these organisms live?
Liberal Arts and Science Academy 2015-2017
University of Pennsylvania 2021
MIT Rocks and Minerals 2018, Fossils 2019

varunscs11's Userpage

UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F
Exalted Member
Exalted Member
Posts: 1518
Joined: January 18th, 2015, 7:42 am
Division: C
State: PA

Re: Fossils B/C

Postby UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F » May 2nd, 2015, 2:28 pm

This is better right....
photo (1).JPG
Phylum
Class
Genus
Mode of Preservation
This mode of preservation is equivalent to what in Mineralogy?
With this type of mode of preservation can you see the fossils without something (nature, humans) altering it?
Why is this genus shaped the way it is
Time Range
Describe the hinge line
Where do/did these organisms live?
Mollusca, Bivalvia, Pholadomya
Mold and Cast
???
No?
???
Triassic-Recent
Missing teeth
shallow seas buried in sediment (now deep waters)

varunscs11
Member
Member
Posts: 163
Joined: March 14th, 2015, 9:02 pm
Division: Grad
State: PA

Re: Fossils B/C

Postby varunscs11 » May 2nd, 2015, 2:35 pm

Correct for the ones you answered!

I was looking for concretion but I guess cast is technically correct although you wouldn't be able to tell unless you cut the concretion open.
They are the paleontology equivalent to geodes.
The genus is shaped this way because of its unusually long siphon


Your turn :mrgreen:
Liberal Arts and Science Academy 2015-2017
University of Pennsylvania 2021
MIT Rocks and Minerals 2018, Fossils 2019

varunscs11's Userpage

UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F
Exalted Member
Exalted Member
Posts: 1518
Joined: January 18th, 2015, 7:42 am
Division: C
State: PA

Re: Fossils B/C

Postby UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F » May 2nd, 2015, 2:43 pm

Correct for the ones you answered!

I was looking for concretion but I guess cast is technically correct although you wouldn't be able to tell unless you cut the concretion open.
They are the paleontology equivalent to geodes.
The genus is shaped this way because of its unusually long siphon


Your turn :mrgreen:
Oh okay.
[img]http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-7Dy5s50Qjbs/UmHYUHRDRjI/AAAAAAAABCM/-EClyx2gZ-s/s1600/20121204174837!MammothVsMastodon.jpg[/img]

varunscs11
Member
Member
Posts: 163
Joined: March 14th, 2015, 9:02 pm
Division: Grad
State: PA

Re: Fossils B/C

Postby varunscs11 » May 2nd, 2015, 3:08 pm

A=Mammuthus 
B=Mammut
Mammuthus probably did not live in the Arctic because Arctic ecosystems have low primary productivities meaning that it would be near impossible for a herbivore of this size to exist (wouldn't be enough food for an herbivore of this size to exist)
guard hair and undercoat?
modern elephants
Mammut was a browser meaning they ate trees, twigs, branches, bushes which is why their cheek teeth have high crowns meant for crushing twigs
A and B probably had tusks for sexual selection and possibly acted as weapons. Could have been used for moving objects or digging
A=grazer B=browser
A= Pliocene-Holocene (Early)
B= Miocene-Pleistocene
Liberal Arts and Science Academy 2015-2017
University of Pennsylvania 2021
MIT Rocks and Minerals 2018, Fossils 2019

varunscs11's Userpage

UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F
Exalted Member
Exalted Member
Posts: 1518
Joined: January 18th, 2015, 7:42 am
Division: C
State: PA

Re: Fossils B/C

Postby UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F » May 2nd, 2015, 3:22 pm

A=Mammuthus 
B=Mammut
Mammuthus probably did not live in the Arctic because Arctic ecosystems have low primary productivities meaning that it would be near impossible for a herbivore of this size to exist (wouldn't be enough food for an herbivore of this size to exist)
guard hair and undercoat?
modern elephants
Mammut was a browser meaning they ate trees, twigs, branches, bushes which is why their cheek teeth have high crowns meant for crushing twigs
A and B probably had tusks for sexual selection and possibly acted as weapons. Could have been used for moving objects or digging
A=grazer B=browser
A= Pliocene-Holocene (Early)
B= Miocene-Pleistocene
Hmm... yes, the guard hair guarded against bad weather while the undercoat kept them warm.
Also, you forgot to list all of the major taxonomic ranks.
Tusks were not used as weapons. They were used for mating and to dig up snow from the ground to find plants.
Your turn!

varunscs11
Member
Member
Posts: 163
Joined: March 14th, 2015, 9:02 pm
Division: Grad
State: PA

Re: Fossils B/C

Postby varunscs11 » May 2nd, 2015, 3:41 pm

Lol. I didn't read the "list all taxonomic ranks". My biggest fear for fossils is that I misbubble/miswrite things because my partner and I go so fast my hand can't keep up. Anyways, regarding the tusks, its possible that the tusks could have been used as weapons because we don't know for sure but that's what elephants use them for in addition to the other reasons.
Liberal Arts and Science Academy 2015-2017
University of Pennsylvania 2021
MIT Rocks and Minerals 2018, Fossils 2019

varunscs11's Userpage

UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F
Exalted Member
Exalted Member
Posts: 1518
Joined: January 18th, 2015, 7:42 am
Division: C
State: PA

Re: Fossils B/C

Postby UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F » May 2nd, 2015, 3:43 pm

its possible that the tusks could have been used as weapons because we don't know for sure but that's what elephants use them for in addition to the other reasons.
Maybe...

But the proctors will probably mark that wrong :P

varunscs11
Member
Member
Posts: 163
Joined: March 14th, 2015, 9:02 pm
Division: Grad
State: PA

Re: Fossils B/C

Postby varunscs11 » May 4th, 2015, 6:38 am

Image
1. Phylum
2. Subphylum
3. Class
4. Scientific Name
5. What is the name of this specific specimen?
6. How close are this species and their modern counterparts? (percent DNA similarity)
7. How does the size of this specimens cranium differ from their modern counterparts?
8. What is the distribution of this specimen?
9. Time Period and when did they go extinct.
10. Who discovered this specimen?
Liberal Arts and Science Academy 2015-2017
University of Pennsylvania 2021
MIT Rocks and Minerals 2018, Fossils 2019

varunscs11's Userpage

User avatar
boomvroomshroom
Member
Member
Posts: 189
Joined: February 19th, 2015, 5:10 pm
Division: C
State: CA

Re: Fossils B/C

Postby boomvroomshroom » May 4th, 2015, 9:22 am

1. Phylum Chordata
2. Subphylum Vertebrata
3. Class Mammalia
4. [i]Homo neanderthalensis[/i]
5. Neanderthal man?
6. 0.12%
7. larger (1600cc vs 1400cc modern man)
8. Central/Mediterranean Europe and small part of upper middle east
9. Middle-Late Pleistocene, went extinct ~28 kya
10. Phillipe-Charles Schmerling


Return to “2015 Question Marathons”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests