Meteorology B

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Meteorology B

Postby GoofyFoofer » August 22nd, 2014, 9:57 am

Welcome to the Meteorology 2015 question marathon.
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I'll kick off...
In the vertical dimension, the upper level jet stream is located closest to which mandatory synoptic scale pressure level?
:)
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Re: Meteorology B

Postby GoofyFoofer » September 18th, 2014, 6:22 pm

GoofyFoofer wrote:In the vertical dimension, the upper level jet stream is located closest to which mandatory synoptic scale pressure level?

Um... Is somebody going to answer? :cry:
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Re: Meteorology B

Postby John Richardsim » September 18th, 2014, 7:39 pm

Are you happy?
The 300 millibar level
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Re: Meteorology B

Postby GoofyFoofer » September 20th, 2014, 7:26 am

Yes, yes I am very happy...
Your turn!
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Re: Meteorology B

Postby John Richardsim » September 20th, 2014, 10:11 am

How can an increase in atmospheric particulates affect temperatures?
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Re: Meteorology B

Postby Unome » September 21st, 2014, 8:03 am

Seems sort of broad, but...
Particulates can block sunlight from entering the earth, causing an unusual drop in temperature (there's probably an opposite effect, but I don't know it :P).
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Re: Meteorology B

Postby John Richardsim » September 21st, 2014, 8:31 am

Correct. Also, particulate matter can serve as cloud condensation nuclei, and the increased incidence of clouds will result in smaller diurnal temperature ranges.
Edit: oh, and I forgot, they can also absorb insolation causing an increase in temperature.
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Re: Meteorology B

Postby John Richardsim » October 18th, 2014, 6:22 pm

Unome wrote:
Seems sort of broad, but...
Particulates can block sunlight from entering the earth, causing an unusual drop in temperature (there's probably an opposite effect, but I don't know it :P).

Your turn, Unome.
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Re: Meteorology B

Postby Unome » October 20th, 2014, 1:38 pm

Ohh... I have no idea... Someone else can ask...
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Re: Meteorology B

Postby John Richardsim » October 20th, 2014, 1:44 pm

What is the difference between an internal forcing mechanism different from an external forcing mechanism? (hint: check the wiki, I put it on there)
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Re: Meteorology B

Postby embokim » November 1st, 2014, 4:47 pm

relatively easy
An internal forcing mechanism is a factor in Earth's atmosphere or on Earth that affects the climate. An External Forcing mechanism is a factor that is present, past the atmosphere. (ie. Axis tilt, distance form the Sun, solar storms)
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Re: Meteorology B

Postby John Richardsim » November 1st, 2014, 5:33 pm

embokim wrote:
relatively easy
An internal forcing mechanism is a factor in Earth's atmosphere or on Earth that affects the climate. An External Forcing mechanism is a factor that is present, past the atmosphere. (ie. Axis tilt, distance form the Sun, solar storms)

Yep, your turn.
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Re: Meteorology B

Postby John Richardsim » November 30th, 2014, 4:26 am

Okay, let's keep this marathon rolling.

Fill in the blanks: Earth's axial tilt varies between ___° and ___° with a period of roughly ______ years.
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Re: Meteorology B

Postby Unome » November 30th, 2014, 6:46 am

I probably messed up...
21-24 degrees over 24,000 years
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Re: Meteorology B

Postby John Richardsim » November 30th, 2014, 8:14 am

Unome wrote:
I probably messed up...
21-24 degrees over 24,000 years

Yeah, that's off.
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