Meteorology B

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coprolite_dipstick
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Re: Meteorology B

Postby coprolite_dipstick » Wed Apr 15, 2015 8:49 pm

meteorology891 wrote:
coprolite_dipstick wrote:Yep! Your turn

What does IPCC stand for?


Answer
Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change


Edit: Forgot to hide my answer. Oops!
Last edited by coprolite_dipstick on Wed Apr 15, 2015 10:35 pm, edited 2 times in total.
2016: CVMC/CV Invite/Mesa Robles/Reg/State
ExpD: 1/1/1/1/9
Foss: 3/1/8/4/1
Green Gen: 2/1/4/1/7
Met: 2/2/3/8/4
the dipstick is an intricate device used to measure the amount of rain in a rain gauge. it can also be used as a derogatory term for your meteorology partners

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Re: Meteorology B

Postby meteorology891 » Wed Apr 15, 2015 8:50 pm

coprolite_dipstick wrote:
meteorology891 wrote:
coprolite_dipstick wrote:Yep! Your turn

What does IPCC stand for?


Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

Yes, Correct! Your turn! :)
:D

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Re: Meteorology B

Postby coprolite_dipstick » Wed Apr 15, 2015 10:36 pm

What is the area of low pressure called, where the trade winds converge?
2016: CVMC/CV Invite/Mesa Robles/Reg/State
ExpD: 1/1/1/1/9
Foss: 3/1/8/4/1
Green Gen: 2/1/4/1/7
Met: 2/2/3/8/4
the dipstick is an intricate device used to measure the amount of rain in a rain gauge. it can also be used as a derogatory term for your meteorology partners

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Re: Meteorology B

Postby meteorology891 » Thu Apr 16, 2015 2:06 am

coprolite_dipstick wrote:What is the area of low pressure called, where the trade winds converge?
Answer
The ITCZ ( Intertropical Convergence Zone)
:D

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Re: Meteorology B

Postby coprolite_dipstick » Thu Apr 16, 2015 4:08 am

meteorology891 wrote:
coprolite_dipstick wrote:What is the area of low pressure called, where the trade winds converge?
Answer
The ITCZ ( Intertropical Convergence Zone)


A+. Your turn! :D
2016: CVMC/CV Invite/Mesa Robles/Reg/State
ExpD: 1/1/1/1/9
Foss: 3/1/8/4/1
Green Gen: 2/1/4/1/7
Met: 2/2/3/8/4
the dipstick is an intricate device used to measure the amount of rain in a rain gauge. it can also be used as a derogatory term for your meteorology partners

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Re: Meteorology B

Postby meteorology891 » Sat Apr 18, 2015 7:06 pm

coprolite_dipstick wrote:
meteorology891 wrote:
coprolite_dipstick wrote:What is the area of low pressure called, where the trade winds converge?
Answer
The ITCZ ( Intertropical Convergence Zone)


A+. Your turn! :D
What is the Aleutian low?
:D

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Re: Meteorology B

Postby coprolite_dipstick » Mon Apr 20, 2015 4:57 pm

Answer
The Aleutian low is a semi-permanent pressure cell in the Northern hemisphere. During the winter, it is located over the Gulf of Alaska and Bering sea. Numerous Pacific Northwest storms intensify under the influence of this air mass. In the summer, it is very weak and often non-existent.


Pretty much taken word for word off my note sheet :lol:
2016: CVMC/CV Invite/Mesa Robles/Reg/State
ExpD: 1/1/1/1/9
Foss: 3/1/8/4/1
Green Gen: 2/1/4/1/7
Met: 2/2/3/8/4
the dipstick is an intricate device used to measure the amount of rain in a rain gauge. it can also be used as a derogatory term for your meteorology partners

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Re: Meteorology B

Postby meteorology891 » Mon Apr 20, 2015 5:11 pm

coprolite_dipstick wrote:
Answer
The Aleutian low is a semi-permanent pressure cell in the Northern hemisphere. During the winter, it is located over the Gulf of Alaska and Bering sea. Numerous Pacific Northwest storms intensify under the influence of this air mass. In the summer, it is very weak and often non-existent.


Pretty much taken word for word off my note sheet :lol:
Yes, you are correct! Your turn! :mrgreen:
:D

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Re: Meteorology B

Postby coprolite_dipstick » Tue Apr 21, 2015 2:11 pm

Pt 1) List these six greenhouse gases in order from most to least abundant in the atmosphere.
CO2, CH4, CFCs, Ozone, O2, H2O
Pt 2) On a per molecule basis, which of these gases is the most effective?
2016: CVMC/CV Invite/Mesa Robles/Reg/State
ExpD: 1/1/1/1/9
Foss: 3/1/8/4/1
Green Gen: 2/1/4/1/7
Met: 2/2/3/8/4
the dipstick is an intricate device used to measure the amount of rain in a rain gauge. it can also be used as a derogatory term for your meteorology partners

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Re: Meteorology B

Postby meteorology891 » Wed Apr 29, 2015 2:12 am

coprolite_dipstick wrote:Pt 1) List these six greenhouse gases in order from most to least abundant in the atmosphere.
CO2, CH4, CFCs, Ozone, O2, H2O
Pt 2) On a per molecule basis, which of these gases is the most effective?
Answer(just point 1)
O2, CO2, CH4, Ozone, CFCs
:D

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Re: Meteorology B

Postby coprolite_dipstick » Wed Apr 29, 2015 3:49 am

meteorology891 wrote:
coprolite_dipstick wrote:Pt 1) List these six greenhouse gases in order from most to least abundant in the atmosphere.
CO2, CH4, CFCs, Ozone, O2, H2O
Pt 2) On a per molecule basis, which of these gases is the most effective?
Answer(just point 1)
O2, CO2, CH4, Ozone, CFCs


You forgot to put H2O, but if I didn't list that it would be correct :mrgreen:
Your turn!
2016: CVMC/CV Invite/Mesa Robles/Reg/State
ExpD: 1/1/1/1/9
Foss: 3/1/8/4/1
Green Gen: 2/1/4/1/7
Met: 2/2/3/8/4
the dipstick is an intricate device used to measure the amount of rain in a rain gauge. it can also be used as a derogatory term for your meteorology partners

meteorology891
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Re: Meteorology B

Postby meteorology891 » Wed May 06, 2015 12:45 am

coprolite_dipstick wrote:
meteorology891 wrote:
coprolite_dipstick wrote:Pt 1) List these six greenhouse gases in order from most to least abundant in the atmosphere.
CO2, CH4, CFCs, Ozone, O2, H2O
Pt 2) On a per molecule basis, which of these gases is the most effective?
Answer(just point 1)
O2, CO2, CH4, Ozone, CFCs


You forgot to put H2O, but if I didn't list that it would be correct :mrgreen:
Your turn!

Name at least 5 ways to study past climate and what you look for in each one.
:D

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Re: Meteorology B

Postby aditi » Wed May 06, 2015 10:18 pm

Hello meteorology891. It's punkprincess. -.-

Answer
1) Tree Rings
- Thick rings are a sign of favorable climate, abundant rainfall, and good growing conditions.
- Thin rings indicate poor growing conditions and lack of rain, as well as natural disasters such as droughts, floods, and volcanoes.

2) Coral Reefs
- Every time a piece of coral skeleton is created, it leaves a record of the conditions under which it was created.
- When water temperatures change, the chemical makeup also changes.
- Therefore, coral from different seasons differs.
- The also have growth rings similar to tree rings.

3) Ice
- Gigantic glaciers down south or up north in Antarctica and in the Arctic.
- These ice formations developed over hundreds of thousands of years as layers of snow pressed together forming ice.
- The bubbles formed when the sculptures compressed create lines just like tree rings.
- Scientists examine the layers to determine the age of the ice and the approximate climate during a given period.

4) Space
- Earth's climate can be monitored through the use of satellites.
- NASA satellites have been observing Earth's atmosphere, oceans, land, snow, and ice from high in space.
- The data they provide can help scientists develop a better understanding of how these different elements interact with each other to influence climate and weather.

5) Ocean
- Studying samples of varves—layers of silt and clay that are deposited year after year on the bottoms of glacial lakes and ponds can help figure out climate.
- Varves provide natural climate records going back several thousand years.
- They consist of two layers.
~ a thick, light-colored layer of silt and fine sand that forms in the spring and summer
~ a thinner, dark-colored layer of clay that forms in the fall and winter and sinks to the bottom.
It's been scientifically proven that people who have more birthdays live longer... ;)
Scientists say that the world is made of protons, neutrons and electrons. They forgot to mention morons. :lol:

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Re: Meteorology B

Postby meteorology891 » Thu May 07, 2015 12:32 pm

aditi wrote:Hello meteorology891. It's punkprincess. -.-

Answer
1) Tree Rings
- Thick rings are a sign of favorable climate, abundant rainfall, and good growing conditions.
- Thin rings indicate poor growing conditions and lack of rain, as well as natural disasters such as droughts, floods, and volcanoes.

2) Coral Reefs
- Every time a piece of coral skeleton is created, it leaves a record of the conditions under which it was created.
- When water temperatures change, the chemical makeup also changes.
- Therefore, coral from different seasons differs.
- The also have growth rings similar to tree rings.

3) Ice
- Gigantic glaciers down south or up north in Antarctica and in the Arctic.
- These ice formations developed over hundreds of thousands of years as layers of snow pressed together forming ice.
- The bubbles formed when the sculptures compressed create lines just like tree rings.
- Scientists examine the layers to determine the age of the ice and the approximate climate during a given period.

4) Space
- Earth's climate can be monitored through the use of satellites.
- NASA satellites have been observing Earth's atmosphere, oceans, land, snow, and ice from high in space.
- The data they provide can help scientists develop a better understanding of how these different elements interact with each other to influence climate and weather.

5) Ocean
- Studying samples of varves—layers of silt and clay that are deposited year after year on the bottoms of glacial lakes and ponds can help figure out climate.
- Varves provide natural climate records going back several thousand years.
- They consist of two layers.
~ a thick, light-colored layer of silt and fine sand that forms in the spring and summer
~ a thinner, dark-colored layer of clay that forms in the fall and winter and sinks to the bottom.
Correct! Your Turn :shock:
:D

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Re: Meteorology B

Postby aditi » Thu May 07, 2015 9:15 pm

meteorology891 wrote:
aditi wrote:Hello meteorology891. It's punkprincess. -.-

Answer
1) Tree Rings
- Thick rings are a sign of favorable climate, abundant rainfall, and good growing conditions.
- Thin rings indicate poor growing conditions and lack of rain, as well as natural disasters such as droughts, floods, and volcanoes.

2) Coral Reefs
- Every time a piece of coral skeleton is created, it leaves a record of the conditions under which it was created.
- When water temperatures change, the chemical makeup also changes.
- Therefore, coral from different seasons differs.
- The also have growth rings similar to tree rings.

3) Ice
- Gigantic glaciers down south or up north in Antarctica and in the Arctic.
- These ice formations developed over hundreds of thousands of years as layers of snow pressed together forming ice.
- The bubbles formed when the sculptures compressed create lines just like tree rings.
- Scientists examine the layers to determine the age of the ice and the approximate climate during a given period.

4) Space
- Earth's climate can be monitored through the use of satellites.
- NASA satellites have been observing Earth's atmosphere, oceans, land, snow, and ice from high in space.
- The data they provide can help scientists develop a better understanding of how these different elements interact with each other to influence climate and weather.

5) Ocean
- Studying samples of varves—layers of silt and clay that are deposited year after year on the bottoms of glacial lakes and ponds can help figure out climate.
- Varves provide natural climate records going back several thousand years.
- They consist of two layers.
~ a thick, light-colored layer of silt and fine sand that forms in the spring and summer
~ a thinner, dark-colored layer of clay that forms in the fall and winter and sinks to the bottom.
Correct! Your Turn :shock:


I have a couple. Name as many reasons as you can as to why climate change is occurring. How much CO2 do we release into the atmosphere? What is the main reason for this? What are the main things responsible for fossil fuel depletion and climate pollution?
It's been scientifically proven that people who have more birthdays live longer... ;)
Scientists say that the world is made of protons, neutrons and electrons. They forgot to mention morons. :lol:

Image

Code: Select all

[list][list=][*][img][url][album][best=][profile][rules][score][test][userpage][wiki]strange[/wiki][/userpage][/test][/score][/rules][/profile][/best][/album][/url][/img][/list][/list]


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