Invasive Species B/C

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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Post by CTMSRoadScholarKING » July 18th, 2015, 11:06 am

Okay so I don't have the draft rules, but I was hoping if some of you could tell me how many species they had changed so I can prepare for it. What other changes did they make to the draft rules?
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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Post by Jaol » July 18th, 2015, 5:31 pm

CTMSRoadScholarKING wrote:
SOnerd wrote:
CTMSRoadScholarKING wrote:Actually I just figured it out(for the ALB and CLB difference), the ALB has no dot at the base of the wing covers, while the CLB does. That would make the CLB also mistaken with the whitespotted pine sawyer.
BTW ALB stands for Asian Longhorned Beetle and CLB stands for Citrus Longhorned Beetle
Going to attempt to tap into my Ento knowledge here:
https://firstdetector.org/static/pdf/SO ... Beetle.pdf
Main differences gleaned from the PDF:
  • Asian Longhorned Beetle is slightly smaller than the Citrus Longhorned Beetle (not the most helpful tidbit for ID'ing)
  • Citrus Longhorned Beetle's spots: "often arranged in a line side-to-side with speckles around apical half, or random"
  • Asian Longhorned Beetle's spots: " randomly placed and of differing sizes (spots may be yellow-brownish). Generally found along the four quarters of elytra if a longitudinal line were divided into fourths
  • This one is probably the most helpful: The elytral bases of the Asian longhorned beetle are smooth, while the elytral bases of the Citrus Longhorned Beetle are rough. (Non-Ento people: Elytra are the wing covers of beetles, by "elytral bases", the PDF is referring to the end of the elytra closest to the head)
So SoNerd, how are we supposed to tell if the elytra are smooth? Maybe if they are shiny? And on an unrelated note, SoNerd Are you doing Invasive Species?
SONerd showed you what she meant by smooth, but the proctors can bring on live "specimens" in for s competition.
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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Post by Magikarpmaster629 » July 30th, 2015, 6:47 pm

[img]http://www.arinvasives.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/5430567-SMPT2.jpg[/img]
1. Scientific and common name
2. Where is this species native to?
3. What kind of organism does this have a mutual symbiotic relationship with?
4. Explain how it is invasive.
5. Control methods?
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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Post by Fluorine » July 30th, 2015, 7:41 pm

Magikarpmaster629 wrote:
[img]http://www.arinvasives.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/5430567-SMPT2.jpg[/img]
1. Scientific and common name
2. Where is this species native to?
3. What kind of organism does this have a mutual symbiotic relationship with?
4. Explain how it is invasive.
5. Control methods?
1. Sirex Woodwasp, [i]Sirex noctilio[/i]
2. Native to Europe, Asia and northern Africa 
3. Crust fungus ([i]Amylostereum areolatum[/i])
4. Attacks pines or weak trees. Causes them to wilt and die. Larval are tightly packed in sawdust making detection and control difficult.
5. Biological Control with parasitic nematode [i](Delandenus siricidicola[/i]). Infects the SW and sterilizes adult females.
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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Post by Magikarpmaster629 » July 30th, 2015, 7:50 pm

Fluorine wrote:
Magikarpmaster629 wrote:
[img]http://www.arinvasives.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/5430567-SMPT2.jpg[/img]
1. Scientific and common name
2. Where is this species native to?
3. What kind of organism does this have a mutual symbiotic relationship with?
4. Explain how it is invasive.
5. Control methods?
1. Sirex Woodwasp, [i]Sirex noctilio[/i]
2. Native to Europe, Asia and northern Africa 
3. Crust fungus ([i]Amylostereum areolatum[/i])
4. Attacks pines or weak trees. Causes them to wilt and die. Larval are tightly packed in sawdust making detection and control difficult.
5. Biological Control with parasitic nematode [i](Delandenus siricidicola[/i]). Infects the SW and sterilizes adult females.
Your turn!
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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Post by Fluorine » July 30th, 2015, 8:03 pm

Seeds of species (Can post plant if needed) [attachment=0]Scioly IV 2.png[/attachment]
(A bit of a challenge can give hints if needed)
1. Scientific and common name
2. What is the native region of this species?
3. What type of areas does this species "usually" invade?
4. What threat does this species pose to livestock?
5. When can mechanical methods be used as a control?
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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Post by Magikarpmaster629 » July 31st, 2015, 5:15 am

1.[i]Sorghum halepense[/i], Johnsongrass
2. It is native to the mediterranean areas in Europe and Africa
3. It is typically found in grasslands or similar biomes
4. When it goes through difficult conditions, it will produce prussic acid, which will damage livestock if they consume it.
5. Continuously tilling the grass works, but only if there are no native plants that could be damaged.
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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Post by Fluorine » July 31st, 2015, 3:10 pm

Magikarpmaster629 wrote:
1.[i]Sorghum halepense[/i], Johnsongrass
2. It is native to the mediterranean areas in Europe and Africa
3. It is typically found in grasslands or similar biomes
4. When it goes through difficult conditions, it will produce prussic acid, which will damage livestock if they consume it.
5. Continuously tilling the grass works, but only if there are no native plants that could be damaged.

Yep all good :D Your turn
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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Post by windu34 » August 14th, 2015, 9:58 am

How do you identify between the autumn olive and the brazilian peppertree, they seem to be the same at first glance.
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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Post by Fluorine » August 14th, 2015, 10:30 am

windu34 wrote:How do you identify between the autumn olive and the brazilian peppertree, they seem to be the same at first glance.
Autumn olives have distinct silvery scales on leaves while Brazilian Peppertree lacks that. You could also look at size as BP can grow to 30 ft while AO usually stops at 16ft or as a shrub even smaller. Secondly, AO possesses thorns which are not present in BP. If you are still stuck flowers on AO will be slightly pale to yellow while BP flowers would be white
If anyone would like to add please because there might be something I missed for an easier ID.
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