Invasive Species B/C

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Fluorine
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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Postby Fluorine » July 30th, 2015, 8:03 pm

Seeds of species (Can post plant if needed) [attachment=0]Scioly IV 2.png[/attachment]
(A bit of a challenge can give hints if needed)
1. Scientific and common name
2. What is the native region of this species?
3. What type of areas does this species "usually" invade?
4. What threat does this species pose to livestock?
5. When can mechanical methods be used as a control?
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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Postby Magikarpmaster629 » July 31st, 2015, 5:15 am

1.[i]Sorghum halepense[/i], Johnsongrass
2. It is native to the mediterranean areas in Europe and Africa
3. It is typically found in grasslands or similar biomes
4. When it goes through difficult conditions, it will produce prussic acid, which will damage livestock if they consume it.
5. Continuously tilling the grass works, but only if there are no native plants that could be damaged.
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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Postby Fluorine » July 31st, 2015, 3:10 pm

1.[i]Sorghum halepense[/i], Johnsongrass
2. It is native to the mediterranean areas in Europe and Africa
3. It is typically found in grasslands or similar biomes
4. When it goes through difficult conditions, it will produce prussic acid, which will damage livestock if they consume it.
5. Continuously tilling the grass works, but only if there are no native plants that could be damaged.

Yep all good :D Your turn
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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Postby windu34 » August 14th, 2015, 9:58 am

How do you identify between the autumn olive and the brazilian peppertree, they seem to be the same at first glance.
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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Postby Fluorine » August 14th, 2015, 10:30 am

How do you identify between the autumn olive and the brazilian peppertree, they seem to be the same at first glance.
Autumn olives have distinct silvery scales on leaves while Brazilian Peppertree lacks that. You could also look at size as BP can grow to 30 ft while AO usually stops at 16ft or as a shrub even smaller. Secondly, AO possesses thorns which are not present in BP. If you are still stuck flowers on AO will be slightly pale to yellow while BP flowers would be white
If anyone would like to add please because there might be something I missed for an easier ID.
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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Postby windu34 » August 14th, 2015, 2:04 pm

How do you identify between the autumn olive and the brazilian peppertree, they seem to be the same at first glance.
Autumn olives have distinct silvery scales on leaves while Brazilian Peppertree lacks that. You could also look at size as BP can grow to 30 ft while AO usually stops at 16ft or as a shrub even smaller. Secondly, AO possesses thorns which are not present in BP. If you are still stuck flowers on AO will be slightly pale to yellow while BP flowers would be white
If anyone would like to add please because there might be something I missed for an easier ID.
That was actually a legitmate question that I was having trouble with lol. Thanks!
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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Postby Fluorine » August 14th, 2015, 2:54 pm

How do you identify between the autumn olive and the brazilian peppertree, they seem to be the same at first glance.
Autumn olives have distinct silvery scales on leaves while Brazilian Peppertree lacks that. You could also look at size as BP can grow to 30 ft while AO usually stops at 16ft or as a shrub even smaller. Secondly, AO possesses thorns which are not present in BP. If you are still stuck flowers on AO will be slightly pale to yellow while BP flowers would be white
If anyone would like to add please because there might be something I missed for an easier ID.
That was actually a legitmate question that I was having trouble with lol. Thanks!
After looking back I noticed it. Sorry, for my stupidity :lol:
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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Postby Magikarpmaster629 » August 14th, 2015, 3:28 pm

Anyone, feel free to go. I'm too lazy to.
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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Postby bernard » August 14th, 2015, 5:55 pm

[img]http://georgesun.github.io/quizzer/images/invasive-species/Lymantria-dispar-9.jpg[/img]
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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Postby Jaol » August 15th, 2015, 1:48 pm

Silverleaf Whitefly (Bemisia argentifolli)
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