Invasive Species B/C

Jaol
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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Postby Jaol » July 6th, 2015, 6:37 am

Number 3 is Alewife (a fish) , Number 5 they are native to the Atlantic Ocean(you forgot to say that). Number 6 is we can also eat them(they are a French Delicacy)
[attachment=0]F7a-Bythotrephes-longimanus.jpg[/attachment]
1. Common name since the attachment already says scientific.
2. Preferred habitat
3. Diet
4. Distribution
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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Postby Magikarpmaster629 » July 16th, 2015, 7:03 am

1. Spiny Water Flea
2. Lakes, or any body of water with zooplankton
3. Zooplankton
4. US distribution is all of the great lakes
Also, how do you people distinguish Asian Long-Horned Beetle and Citrus Long-Horned Beetle? I haven't been able to do so.....
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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Postby Jaol » July 16th, 2015, 8:03 am

1. Spiny Water Flea
2. Lakes, or any body of water with zooplankton
3. Zooplankton
4. US distribution is all of the great lakes
Also, how do you people distinguish Asian Long-Horned Beetle and Citrus Long-Horned Beetle? I haven't been able to do so.....
Correct! I can't distinguish them yet. I'm planning to put a few pages about how to differentiate similar looking ones in my binder.
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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Postby CTMSRoadScholarKING » July 16th, 2015, 2:45 pm

1. Spiny Water Flea
2. Lakes, or any body of water with zooplankton
3. Zooplankton
4. US distribution is all of the great lakes
Also, how do you people distinguish Asian Long-Horned Beetle and Citrus Long-Horned Beetle? I haven't been able to do so.....
From the pictures I have seen, I think the Citrus Long-Horned Beetle has a little bluish tinge on the antennae and its legs. Besides that I have no idea at all
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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Postby CTMSRoadScholarKING » July 16th, 2015, 3:45 pm

Actually I just figured it out(for the ALB and CLB difference), the ALB has no dot at the base of the wing covers, while the CLB does. That would make the CLB also mistaken with the whitespotted pine sawyer.
BTW ALB stands for Asian Longhorned Beetle and CLB stands for Citrus Longhorned Beetle
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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Postby SOnerd » July 16th, 2015, 5:47 pm

Actually I just figured it out(for the ALB and CLB difference), the ALB has no dot at the base of the wing covers, while the CLB does. That would make the CLB also mistaken with the whitespotted pine sawyer.
BTW ALB stands for Asian Longhorned Beetle and CLB stands for Citrus Longhorned Beetle
Going to attempt to tap into my Ento knowledge here:
https://firstdetector.org/static/pdf/SO ... Beetle.pdf
Main differences gleaned from the PDF:
  • Asian Longhorned Beetle is slightly smaller than the Citrus Longhorned Beetle (not the most helpful tidbit for ID'ing)
  • Citrus Longhorned Beetle's spots: "often arranged in a line side-to-side with speckles around apical half, or random"
  • Asian Longhorned Beetle's spots: " randomly placed and of differing sizes (spots may be yellow-brownish). Generally found along the four quarters of elytra if a longitudinal line were divided into fourths
  • This one is probably the most helpful: The elytral bases of the Asian longhorned beetle are smooth, while the elytral bases of the Citrus Longhorned Beetle are rough. (Non-Ento people: Elytra are the wing covers of beetles, by "elytral bases", the PDF is referring to the end of the elytra closest to the head)
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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Postby Magikarpmaster629 » July 16th, 2015, 8:13 pm

Ento Superpowers

Thanks SOnerd!
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CTMSRoadScholarKING
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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Postby CTMSRoadScholarKING » July 17th, 2015, 3:36 pm

Actually I just figured it out(for the ALB and CLB difference), the ALB has no dot at the base of the wing covers, while the CLB does. That would make the CLB also mistaken with the whitespotted pine sawyer.
BTW ALB stands for Asian Longhorned Beetle and CLB stands for Citrus Longhorned Beetle
Going to attempt to tap into my Ento knowledge here:
https://firstdetector.org/static/pdf/SO ... Beetle.pdf
Main differences gleaned from the PDF:
  • Asian Longhorned Beetle is slightly smaller than the Citrus Longhorned Beetle (not the most helpful tidbit for ID'ing)
  • Citrus Longhorned Beetle's spots: "often arranged in a line side-to-side with speckles around apical half, or random"
  • Asian Longhorned Beetle's spots: " randomly placed and of differing sizes (spots may be yellow-brownish). Generally found along the four quarters of elytra if a longitudinal line were divided into fourths
  • This one is probably the most helpful: The elytral bases of the Asian longhorned beetle are smooth, while the elytral bases of the Citrus Longhorned Beetle are rough. (Non-Ento people: Elytra are the wing covers of beetles, by "elytral bases", the PDF is referring to the end of the elytra closest to the head)
So SoNerd, how are we supposed to tell if the elytra are smooth? Maybe if they are shiny? And on an unrelated note, SoNerd Are you doing Invasive Species?
Events (St.J, Pembroke, Northland, Regionals)
Herpetology (4,6,4,)
Helicopters (2,5,6,)
Dynamic (NA,NA,NA,)
Overall (1,3,2,)
#tehentocult
#herpsisgoingtokillme

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SOnerd
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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Postby SOnerd » July 17th, 2015, 3:47 pm

Actually I just figured it out(for the ALB and CLB difference), the ALB has no dot at the base of the wing covers, while the CLB does. That would make the CLB also mistaken with the whitespotted pine sawyer.
BTW ALB stands for Asian Longhorned Beetle and CLB stands for Citrus Longhorned Beetle
Going to attempt to tap into my Ento knowledge here:
https://firstdetector.org/static/pdf/SO ... Beetle.pdf
Main differences gleaned from the PDF:
  • Asian Longhorned Beetle is slightly smaller than the Citrus Longhorned Beetle (not the most helpful tidbit for ID'ing)
  • Citrus Longhorned Beetle's spots: "often arranged in a line side-to-side with speckles around apical half, or random"
  • Asian Longhorned Beetle's spots: " randomly placed and of differing sizes (spots may be yellow-brownish). Generally found along the four quarters of elytra if a longitudinal line were divided into fourths
  • This one is probably the most helpful: The elytral bases of the Asian longhorned beetle are smooth, while the elytral bases of the Citrus Longhorned Beetle are rough. (Non-Ento people: Elytra are the wing covers of beetles, by "elytral bases", the PDF is referring to the end of the elytra closest to the head)
So SoNerd, how are we supposed to tell if the elytra are smooth? Maybe if they are shiny? And on an unrelated note, SoNerd Are you doing Invasive Species?
By saying that the elytra are smooth, I meant that CLB has ridges/bumps (not sure how to describe it) on the part of the elytra closest to the head. The remaining part of the elytra on both beetles seem to be normal (not bumpy/ridgy). See photos for a visual aid to my very confusing and poorly worded description. :P
Notice how the "top" of the elytra are smooth. [img]http://i.imgur.com/sKGzt0O.png[/img]
Notice how the "top" of the elytra are "ridged". [img]http://i.imgur.com/rZbeV4i.png[/img]
I'm not sure whether I will be doing Invasives or not next year.
Ento is Lyfe. <3 Ento. <3 Bugs. <3 Insects.
I didn't choose the Bug Lyfe, the Bug Lyfe chose me.

Live and die for Teh Insectz.
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"No one can truly be called an entomologist , sir; the subject is too vast for any single human intelligence to grasp". -OW Holmes

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2018 National Herpetology Bronze Medalist
2019 Herpetology National Champion

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CTMSRoadScholarKING
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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Postby CTMSRoadScholarKING » July 17th, 2015, 3:48 pm

Actually I just figured it out(for the ALB and CLB difference), the ALB has no dot at the base of the wing covers, while the CLB does. That would make the CLB also mistaken with the whitespotted pine sawyer.
BTW ALB stands for Asian Longhorned Beetle and CLB stands for Citrus Longhorned Beetle
By dot I mean the ALB has a black scutellum and the CLB has a white scutellum.
Events (St.J, Pembroke, Northland, Regionals)
Herpetology (4,6,4,)
Helicopters (2,5,6,)
Dynamic (NA,NA,NA,)
Overall (1,3,2,)
#tehentocult
#herpsisgoingtokillme


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