Forensics C

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Panda Weasley
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Re: Forensics C

Post by Panda Weasley » December 18th, 2015, 6:17 am

So today in Forensics practice our coach gave us Lithium Chloride for the first time (she hadn't been able to re-stock certain powders until now). She told us that it was always either rock hard or in a liquid solution. I was wondering if you all think it is better to practice with the liquid or the rock hard version, and how it will appear at competition. Right now she only has the solution, but I'm sure she would get us the powdered form if we thought it was necessary.
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Re: Forensics C

Post by samlan16 » December 18th, 2015, 12:42 pm

Panda Weasley wrote:So today in Forensics practice our coach gave us Lithium Chloride for the first time (she hadn't been able to re-stock certain powders until now). She told us that it was always either rock hard or in a liquid solution. I was wondering if you all think it is better to practice with the liquid or the rock hard version, and how it will appear at competition. Right now she only has the solution, but I'm sure she would get us the powdered form if we thought it was necessary.
Like I say with Crime Busters, do any and all forms of the compound that you may receive. LiCl is very hygroscopic, meaning you will often get the rock solid form. However, you may get an inexperienced or extremely nice proctor and receive a solution. I'd say to do both.
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Forensic Analysis

Post by SydneyJabs » January 9th, 2016, 7:18 pm

So, I've been doing forensics as one of my main events for two years now, and in all of that time I have yet to really nail an analysis. Obviously if your powder, fiber, and DNA IDs are wrong, then your analysis will be incorrect, but I have a question nonetheless: what guidelines do YOU follow when writing an analysis?
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Re: Forensics C

Post by samlan16 » January 10th, 2016, 10:26 am

Moving this question into the right forum:
SydneyJabs wrote:So, I've been doing forensics as one of my main events for two years now, and in all of that time I have yet to really nail an analysis. Obviously if your powder, fiber, and DNA IDs are wrong, then your analysis will be incorrect, but I have a question nonetheless: what guidelines do YOU follow when writing an analysis?
There are always 2 parts to an analysis: why one (or more) suspect(s) committed the crime, and why the others are innocent.

For the former, simply list out all the associated evidence, then explain why it is associated with the suspect(s). Stay within the boundaries of the crime scene and testimonies: do not try to extrapolate any motives or reconstruct events that do not have associated evidence.

For the latter, explain why any evidence associated with the innocent suspects does not imply that they are guilty. For example, if flour is found at the crime scene, which is a bakery, and the baker is a suspect, the flour would be associated with his or her everyday job duties and cannot possibly imply guilt. If fingerprints of an innocent suspect are found, it could simply be that he or she was there and left the print. More evidence is required to connect his or her presence to the crime.

Hope this helps!
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Re: Forensics C

Post by SciOly15 » January 19th, 2016, 3:35 pm

I have a polymer flowchart, but the problem is that it doesn't differentiate between PC and PMMA, and PETE and PVC. Do you guys have any ways you differentiate between those two pairs?

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Re: Forensics C

Post by QuantumTech » January 28th, 2016, 4:07 pm

Does anybody know where to obtain polymers for practice burn tests (ideally at a national store or popular in California)? If all else fails I guess I will have to buy one of those expensive Forensics Kits from Ward's Science. :(

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Re: Forensics C

Post by QuantumTech » January 28th, 2016, 4:09 pm

QuantumTech wrote:Does anybody know where to obtain polymers for practice burn tests (ideally at a national store or popular in California)? If all else fails I guess I will have to buy one of those expensive Forensics Kits from Ward's Science. :(
Edit: I mean the FIbers portion of the polymers.

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Re: Forensics C

Post by Panda Weasley » January 28th, 2016, 4:50 pm

QuantumTech wrote:
QuantumTech wrote:Does anybody know where to obtain polymers for practice burn tests (ideally at a national store or popular in California)? If all else fails I guess I will have to buy one of those expensive Forensics Kits from Ward's Science. :(
Edit: I mean the FIbers portion of the polymers.
You don't need super high quality samples of the fibers. If you go to a craft store that sells fabric you will probably be able to find samples of what you need. If you get a small enough sample they will probably give it to you for free. Just make sure they aren't mixtures. If there is something they don't have a sample of you could also try a thrift store or normal clothing store.
I hope this helps!

EDIT: I just did a quick search on Joann's website and found fabric samples for all of the fibers except linen. It also doesn't have to be a fabric sample, it's just what I thought of. Yarn/string should work as well.
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Re: Forensics C

Post by amp 3914 » February 15th, 2016, 8:59 am

Is there a limit to the amount of notes that you can have for Forensics?

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Re: Forensics C

Post by samlan16 » February 15th, 2016, 10:02 am

amp 3914 wrote:Is there a limit to the amount of notes that you can have for Forensics?
According to rule 2.a.xv, you may bring a binder of any size filled with anything as long as the materials are secured to the rings.
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