Fossils B/C

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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby Unome » Sun Oct 11, 2015 1:43 pm

azuritemalachite wrote:
Panda Weasley wrote:So this is probably a stupid question, but hey I'm new to the event. When ID'ing the fossils they won't ask specific questions about the actual thing right (ie- mating, environmental impact, etc.)? It's just stuff relating to the fossil? I also noticed that the list is organized by taxonomy, are they going to ask questions about overall orders (etc.) like in Entomology?

Also, since we are allowed to bring a binder would it make sense to basically make our own field guide if we have time? Is anyone else doing this?


In the event, they may ask you impact, but it's not very in-depth questions, it's mainly like 'Is this an index fossil?' type questions. They'll ask things relating to it's life when it was alive like it's mode of life (ie benthic [living on the ocean floor], pelagic [swimming], sessile [rooted to the ground], etc.), how it ate its food (ie filter feeding, etc), special traits (ie poisonous 'tooth'), anatomy of the fossil, etc. There's also stuff about the fossil like how it's formed and such. You'll notice that there's not too too much on dinosaurs, the mammals, and other larger animals since the event supervisor will probably not have the actual fossils, so it'll be identification based on pictures and people often repeat pictures.

There will probably be a taxonomy question at every other station, so yes it is probably going to be like entomology on that aspect. Also as a disclaimer, since I am basing this information on my experience in the B division, I don't really know what's going to be in the C division event. A tip is to leave no stone unturned (or something like that) and make sure you have basic information on everything listed on the official list.

I've never seen anyone actually make their own field guide and I don't think that's really recommended for competition, but you can bring any field guide even if it's not recommended Smithsonian or Audubon. I think that since you're also making the binder, which should essentially have everything you need to know, you don't really need a make another resource that'll have the same information. So yeah, this was a lot of typing...

On the note of Div C, the rules are identical and the tests on the test exchange are very similar to Div B tests, so there shouldn't be much difference. As for the level of detail about the fossils that they'll ask, it depends on the test; Regional and State supervisors tend not to ask detailed questions, but they'll often have a few questions about something otherwise obscure that happens to be listed in a textbook they use. Invitationals tend to have longer and more detailed tes (at lest around here; in places like Illinois or Michigan it'll be different). I'm not entirely sure what you mean by making a field guide; if you mean to structure your binder like a field guide, that would certainly help.
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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby Panda Weasley » Sun Oct 11, 2015 1:58 pm

Unome wrote:
azuritemalachite wrote:
Panda Weasley wrote:So this is probably a stupid question, but hey I'm new to the event. When ID'ing the fossils they won't ask specific questions about the actual thing right (ie- mating, environmental impact, etc.)? It's just stuff relating to the fossil? I also noticed that the list is organized by taxonomy, are they going to ask questions about overall orders (etc.) like in Entomology?

Also, since we are allowed to bring a binder would it make sense to basically make our own field guide if we have time? Is anyone else doing this?


In the event, they may ask you impact, but it's not very in-depth questions, it's mainly like 'Is this an index fossil?' type questions. They'll ask things relating to it's life when it was alive like it's mode of life (ie benthic [living on the ocean floor], pelagic [swimming], sessile [rooted to the ground], etc.), how it ate its food (ie filter feeding, etc), special traits (ie poisonous 'tooth'), anatomy of the fossil, etc. There's also stuff about the fossil like how it's formed and such. You'll notice that there's not too too much on dinosaurs, the mammals, and other larger animals since the event supervisor will probably not have the actual fossils, so it'll be identification based on pictures and people often repeat pictures.

There will probably be a taxonomy question at every other station, so yes it is probably going to be like entomology on that aspect. Also as a disclaimer, since I am basing this information on my experience in the B division, I don't really know what's going to be in the C division event. A tip is to leave no stone unturned (or something like that) and make sure you have basic information on everything listed on the official list.

I've never seen anyone actually make their own field guide and I don't think that's really recommended for competition, but you can bring any field guide even if it's not recommended Smithsonian or Audubon. I think that since you're also making the binder, which should essentially have everything you need to know, you don't really need a make another resource that'll have the same information. So yeah, this was a lot of typing...

On the note of Div C, the rules are identical and the tests on the test exchange are very similar to Div B tests, so there shouldn't be much difference. As for the level of detail about the fossils that they'll ask, it depends on the test; Regional and State supervisors tend not to ask detailed questions, but they'll often have a few questions about something otherwise obscure that happens to be listed in a textbook they use. Invitationals tend to have longer and more detailed tes (at lest around here; in places like Illinois or Michigan it'll be different). I'm not entirely sure what you mean by making a field guide; if you mean to structure your binder like a field guide, that would certainly help.

Thanks guys for your help!
What I meant about the field guide thing is to extract the pages I would need from the book and put them in the ID section of the binder (attached to paper most likely). That way I would have the same information there, but I wouldn't have to flip through extra pages. Does that make any sense?
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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby Unome » Sun Oct 11, 2015 3:40 pm

Panda Weasley wrote:
Unome wrote:
azuritemalachite wrote:
In the event, they may ask you impact, but it's not very in-depth questions, it's mainly like 'Is this an index fossil?' type questions. They'll ask things relating to it's life when it was alive like it's mode of life (ie benthic [living on the ocean floor], pelagic [swimming], sessile [rooted to the ground], etc.), how it ate its food (ie filter feeding, etc), special traits (ie poisonous 'tooth'), anatomy of the fossil, etc. There's also stuff about the fossil like how it's formed and such. You'll notice that there's not too too much on dinosaurs, the mammals, and other larger animals since the event supervisor will probably not have the actual fossils, so it'll be identification based on pictures and people often repeat pictures.

There will probably be a taxonomy question at every other station, so yes it is probably going to be like entomology on that aspect. Also as a disclaimer, since I am basing this information on my experience in the B division, I don't really know what's going to be in the C division event. A tip is to leave no stone unturned (or something like that) and make sure you have basic information on everything listed on the official list.

I've never seen anyone actually make their own field guide and I don't think that's really recommended for competition, but you can bring any field guide even if it's not recommended Smithsonian or Audubon. I think that since you're also making the binder, which should essentially have everything you need to know, you don't really need a make another resource that'll have the same information. So yeah, this was a lot of typing...

On the note of Div C, the rules are identical and the tests on the test exchange are very similar to Div B tests, so there shouldn't be much difference. As for the level of detail about the fossils that they'll ask, it depends on the test; Regional and State supervisors tend not to ask detailed questions, but they'll often have a few questions about something otherwise obscure that happens to be listed in a textbook they use. Invitationals tend to have longer and more detailed tes (at lest around here; in places like Illinois or Michigan it'll be different). I'm not entirely sure what you mean by making a field guide; if you mean to structure your binder like a field guide, that would certainly help.

Thanks guys for your help!
What I meant about the field guide thing is to extract the pages I would need from the book and put them in the ID section of the binder (attached to paper most likely). That way I would have the same information there, but I wouldn't have to flip through extra pages. Does that make any sense?

I'd say it's better to type up info yourself, both because you learn it better and have to reference the binder less, and because (if you know how to separate accurate and inaccurate info) you can get a lot more info from the internet than you'll ever find in a field guide (although you should also use the info from the field guide, because much of it can't be found on the internet).
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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby kaziscioly » Mon Oct 26, 2015 11:40 pm

How do you distinguish between Mastodon & Mammoth?

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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby Unome » Tue Oct 27, 2015 12:22 am

kaziscioly wrote:How do you distinguish between Mastodon & Mammoth?

Mostly they'll give you teeth; if so, mastodon has large bumps (like humans) while mammoth has longer teeth like horses.
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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby ampy1234567 » Sat Oct 31, 2015 8:32 pm

Do we need to know about the pre-Cambrian time periods? From my understanding you don't because there were basically no fossils from that time but I just wanna make sure.
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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby Unome » Sat Oct 31, 2015 9:04 pm

ampy1234567 wrote:Do we need to know about the pre-Cambrian time periods? From my understanding you don't because there were basically no fossils from that time but I just wanna make sure.

I'd suggest you know them just in case; there are certainly important fossils from there, just none of them are on the list.
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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby 89301262 » Sat Nov 07, 2015 7:16 pm

Unome wrote:
ampy1234567 wrote:Do we need to know about the pre-Cambrian time periods? From my understanding you don't because there were basically no fossils from that time but I just wanna make sure.

I'd suggest you know them just in case; there are certainly important fossils from there, just none of them are on the list.

Last year there was mention of the Pre-Cambrain era on a regionals test, but not specifically fossils in it. I'd still suggest learning it.
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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby rockster » Fri Nov 13, 2015 11:40 pm

So, one of the things we have toj know is adaptations and morphologic features of major fossil groups, but what exactly are they talking about? Like Class Placodermi or more specific like each Genus? So confused about that.
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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby varunscs11 » Sat Nov 14, 2015 1:40 am

By major groups they mean all groups on the list (its like anatomy of major groups but they can ask about the anatomy of any group). For nationals they follow the rules to the dot but if you want to do well at invitationals you should know it for every group :D
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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby rockster » Sat Nov 14, 2015 1:54 am

varunscs11 wrote:By major groups they mean all groups on the list (its like anatomy of major groups but they can ask about the anatomy of any group). For nationals they follow the rules to the dot but if you want to do well at invitationals you should know it for every group :D


ok thanks
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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby embokim » Wed Nov 18, 2015 10:22 pm

Does anyone want to give some useful tips on what to study for the Geologic Time Scale. Thanks. :?:
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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby azuritemalachite » Thu Nov 26, 2015 4:19 am

embokim wrote:Does anyone want to give some useful tips on what to study for the Geologic Time Scale. Thanks. :?:

Make sure you know the time period for each organism on the list and then have a large timescale in your binder for reference. (This is the one I use: http://www.geosociety.org/science/timescale/timescl.pdf) For general time scale stuff, know the extinctions and the explosions (You know Permian Extinction, Cambrian Explosion, et cetera et cetera) and for general reference know a little bit about what occured in each period of the Paleozoic Era since a lot of organisms are going to have more specific time ranges (For example, Carboniferous had a lot of trees and plants and stuff).

For future reference, my favorite website currently is http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/index.php. (go to Online Exhibits and then History of life through time and THEN click on list of available taxa and then click on whatever needed)
NB: I use this website mainly for invertebrates and http://www.enchantedlearning.com/subjects/dinosaurs/ for the dinosaurs.
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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby coprolite_dipstick » Sun Nov 29, 2015 2:02 am

embokim wrote:Does anyone want to give some useful tips on what to study for the Geologic Time Scale. Thanks. :?:


More stuff about geologic time scale (yay!)

I recommend this document - it has simple text, simple illustrations, pretty helpful stuff if simplicity helps your brain wrap itself around certain topics. It explains it pretty well for such a simple document :D

Also -- know the nicknames for each period of time: for example, the Devonian period is known as the "Age of Fish" or the "Age of Fishes." That's something that you could write in on your large timescale for reference, I guess. If you go onto the petrified wood museum website, there's a 2009 state fossil test from Colorado with a whole station on time periods (Station 9, for your reference). If you look on the answer key, you can get all the answers from it, which tell you "devonian was the age of fish" "during the carboniferous, there were widespread coal swamps" etc.

Another tip (mostly just an organization tip, but still):

Personally, I think it's a good idea to write between the columns and in the margins of the official fossil list in your binder - next to each organism, you can write the time period(s) in which it lived. Another thing I like to do is put color coded dots in front of the number - red is index fossil, green is extant, etc (I would do that with time periods as well, but it's a bit of a hassle to memorize what color = which period).
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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby JoJoKeKe » Fri Jan 15, 2016 4:59 am

Hi, everyone-

Some of you might remember me from this thread last year. My first question regarding this year is: "Where did you guys get all of your taxonomy information relating to all the different organisms?"

For my other event I've been using itis.gov, but I've found this ineffective for Fossils. What have you guys been using? Are there any "Holy grail" websites that you have been using to study and find invaluable pictures of specimens? Thank you all!!! :)
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