Fossils B/C

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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F » April 10th, 2016, 2:56 pm

Once again I have questions regarding this event.

While taking tests for fossils I found some inconsistencies in some of the questions and answers, so I'm here to ask you for your experience and information. Thanks!

So I know that birds are descended from Saurischians, so Archaeopteryx is more closely related to Velociraptor than Iguanodon. However, does Archaeopteryx still have the hip structure of Ornithischians?

The anatomy questions come up quite regularly, so I must ask, do any of you have a diagram of brachiopod anatomy that you find very useful (Note: I have a basic understanding of the Articulate Brachiopod and lophophore, pedicle, etc. but am not sure on costae, teeth, growth lines, etc.)

I found on one test that the reason why Septastraea was able to live in the deeper parts of the ocean (while still preferring shallow warm waters) was because it did not depend on a symbiotic relationship with algae, while on another test it said that Septastraea does have a symbiotic relationship with algae. Could anyone clarify?

One last clarification on general anatomy: I want to make sure that I have this down, and please correct me if I'm wrong.
Gastropods feed with a radula, The individuals that make up Bryozoans are called zooids, Brachiopods feed with a lophophore (as well as Bryozoans to my understanding?), the buoyancy mechanism in nautiloids/ammonoids is the siphuncle, and the dividing chambers of coral/the previous listed are septa, as well as the skeleton secreted by polyps is the corallite.

Thank you so much! :)
I think Archaeopteryx is bird-hipped.
Here you go
Septastrea doesn't have a symbiotic relationship with algae (as far as I'm aware).

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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby Unome » April 10th, 2016, 3:44 pm

Once again I have questions regarding this event.

While taking tests for fossils I found some inconsistencies in some of the questions and answers, so I'm here to ask you for your experience and information. Thanks!

So I know that birds are descended from Saurischians, so Archaeopteryx is more closely related to Velociraptor than Iguanodon. However, does Archaeopteryx still have the hip structure of Ornithischians?

The anatomy questions come up quite regularly, so I must ask, do any of you have a diagram of brachiopod anatomy that you find very useful (Note: I have a basic understanding of the Articulate Brachiopod and lophophore, pedicle, etc. but am not sure on costae, teeth, growth lines, etc.)

I found on one test that the reason why Septastraea was able to live in the deeper parts of the ocean (while still preferring shallow warm waters) was because it did not depend on a symbiotic relationship with algae, while on another test it said that Septastraea does have a symbiotic relationship with algae. Could anyone clarify?

One last clarification on general anatomy: I want to make sure that I have this down, and please correct me if I'm wrong.
Gastropods feed with a radula, The individuals that make up Bryozoans are called zooids, Brachiopods feed with a lophophore (as well as Bryozoans to my understanding?), the buoyancy mechanism in nautiloids/ammonoids is the siphuncle, and the dividing chambers of coral/the previous listed are septa, as well as the skeleton secreted by polyps is the corallite.

Thank you so much! :)
I think Archaeopteryx is bird-hipped.
Here you go
Septastrea doesn't have a symbiotic relationship with algae (as far as I'm aware).
I'm not sure about Septastrea specifically, but I think some Scleractinian corals do have symbiotic relationships with some brown algae.
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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby Gelinas » April 12th, 2016, 11:16 am

Ok
2016--Rustin/Regional/State/National

Fossils--1/1/1/-
Bottle Rocket--3/-/1/-
Wind Power--7/-/10/-

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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby Terbin73 » May 1st, 2016, 11:35 am

Why is this?! For the past 13 years this geology rotation has been a THREE year thing, not TWO. Does anyone have any idea why NSO would change this just this year? Finish the three years for fossils!
I'm really upset about this too. :( I think it's cause they're trying to make everything a 2 year rotation.
I agree, Fossils has been my favorite event so far, and it is sad to see that they are cutting its span short.

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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby daydreamer0023 » May 2nd, 2016, 7:12 pm

Once again I have questions regarding this event.

While taking tests for fossils I found some inconsistencies in some of the questions and answers, so I'm here to ask you for your experience and information. Thanks!

So I know that birds are descended from Saurischians, so Archaeopteryx is more closely related to Velociraptor than Iguanodon. However, does Archaeopteryx still have the hip structure of Ornithischians?

The anatomy questions come up quite regularly, so I must ask, do any of you have a diagram of brachiopod anatomy that you find very useful (Note: I have a basic understanding of the Articulate Brachiopod and lophophore, pedicle, etc. but am not sure on costae, teeth, growth lines, etc.)

I found on one test that the reason why Septastraea was able to live in the deeper parts of the ocean (while still preferring shallow warm waters) was because it did not depend on a symbiotic relationship with algae, while on another test it said that Septastraea does have a symbiotic relationship with algae. Could anyone clarify?

One last clarification on general anatomy: I want to make sure that I have this down, and please correct me if I'm wrong.
Gastropods feed with a radula, The individuals that make up Bryozoans are called zooids, Brachiopods feed with a lophophore (as well as Bryozoans to my understanding?), the buoyancy mechanism in nautiloids/ammonoids is the siphuncle, and the dividing chambers of coral/the previous listed are septa, as well as the skeleton secreted by polyps is the corallite.

Thank you so much! :)
I think Archaeopteryx is bird-hipped.
Here you go
Septastrea doesn't have a symbiotic relationship with algae (as far as I'm aware).

Correct me if I'm wrong, but Archaeopteryx's hip structure is an intermediate between saurischian and birds.
Hope the following link helps (see the heading of A Tale of Two Pelvises): http://www.talkorigins.org/faqs/archaeopteryx/info.html
"I am among those who think that science has great beauty. A scientist in his laboratory is not only a technician: he is also a child placed before natural phenomena which impress him like a fairy tale." - Marie Curie

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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby daydreamer0023 » May 13th, 2016, 6:49 pm

Also, (apologies for the double post) what is the Nationals Fossils test like?
"I am among those who think that science has great beauty. A scientist in his laboratory is not only a technician: he is also a child placed before natural phenomena which impress him like a fairy tale." - Marie Curie

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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby JoJoKeKe » May 14th, 2016, 10:35 am

Also, (apologies for the double post) what is the Nationals Fossils test like?
I did not participate in the fossils event in C Division, and will not be doing so this year either, but I'm to assume that it is somewhat similar in format to the Division B test.

Last year the test was comprised of roughly 25 stations where you had 2 minutes at each. There were approximately 5 medium difficulty questions (1-2 short answer + 3-4 multiple choice) at each station. I'm to believe that ~23 stations had real fossil specimens.
Tournaments (2016): State / Nationals
Fossils: 3 / 8
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Picture This: 1 / 17
Invasives: 1 / 24

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Events 2019: Herpetology, Fossils, Dynamic Planet, Fermi Questions

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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby SenseiSushi » May 17th, 2016, 4:35 am

Also, (apologies for the double post) what is the Nationals Fossils test like?
I did not participate in the fossils event in C Division, and will not be doing so this year either, but I'm to assume that it is somewhat similar in format to the Division B test.

Last year the test was comprised of roughly 25 stations where you had 2 minutes at each. There were approximately 5 medium difficulty questions (1-2 short answer + 3-4 multiple choice) at each station. I'm to believe that ~23 stations had real fossil specimens.
I did Rocks and Minerals at nationals in 2014 and I'm going to assume the tests will be set up similarly. JoJoKeKe is right with how it's usually stationed. Usually they have a laminated question sheet and a cup filled with the specimens. I believe a professor usually runs it so expect it to be insanely tough (like all the other national events).
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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby Entomology » May 20th, 2016, 6:58 pm

I'm not sure when this forum will lock, but I'm not taking any chances. I'll keep this short too, because I have already bored enough of you with long, emotional scioly posts.

Thank you fossils, thank you so so much for 2 years of fun, stress, competitions, and dinosaurs.
I will never be able to put into words completely about how much fun this event was and how much I enjoyed it. Fossils really opened my eyes to geology and paleontology and it exposed me to so much more and I can't believe it's over (for me, at least). I am very sorry took this event for granted at first, and I know now that it's a mistake I will never make again.

I'm still upset about the three year rotation to two year rotation thing, but I know for sure that this isn't the last time you'll see me competing in fossils.
It's going to take 2 more long years, but I will always wait.
thank you again for everything.
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Herpetology, Fossils, Boomilever, Mousetrap Vehicle

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Re: Fossils B/C

Postby daydreamer0023 » May 27th, 2016, 6:01 pm

Ah...this event. Apologies for a double post - I accidently posted the post below twice... :S
Last edited by daydreamer0023 on May 27th, 2016, 6:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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