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Super Glue

Posted: November 12th, 2015, 12:08 pm
by brayden box
What are some good types of super glue to use, and what are some different ways to apply it?

Re: Super Glue

Posted: November 12th, 2015, 2:08 pm
by JonB
What are some good types of super glue to use, and what are some different ways to apply it?

Insta Cure+

Use some of the methods talked about in the threads this year. We use micropipette tips on the ends of the bottles.

Re: Super Glue

Posted: November 13th, 2015, 6:28 am
by brayden box
Where would you get micropipettes? And are they expensive?

Re: Super Glue

Posted: November 13th, 2015, 7:14 am
by bernard
Where would you get micropipettes? And are they expensive?
You can get micropipette tips from the internet, or a science teacher at your school might have some. For JonB's approach, you do not need a micropipette, just the disposable plastic tips.

I've used transfer pipettes, also plastic and disposable. Take a disposable pipette, stretch the tip with pliers and you'll have a narrower tip. Cut the pipette at a wider section, attach to the top of your glue nozzle. Picture here: http://www.scioly.org/phpBB3/viewtopic. ... 30#p281870.

Re: Super Glue

Posted: November 17th, 2015, 11:05 am
by jander14indoor
Here's another alternative for applying small amounts of CA to light structures. This is what I coach Wright Stuff competitors to use.
http://www.gryffinaero.com/models/ffpag ... yaapp.html

Jeff Anderson
Livonia, MI

Re: Super Glue

Posted: March 12th, 2016, 10:37 am
by rigor_boi
What viscosity of CA glue (Insta-cure, to be specific) would be optimal for a bridge? Does it matter?

Re: Super Glue

Posted: March 13th, 2016, 9:08 am
by 0ddrenaline
What viscosity of CA glue (Insta-cure, to be specific) would be optimal for a bridge? Does it matter?
The medium viscosity purple bottle will be good most of the time. On rare occasions I use the super thin blue bottle glue when medium can't do the job. Super thin is easily absorbed by the wood, so it's not effective to press the wood together after putting the glue on like you can with medium viscosity. It can be used to put glue in tight areas when I absolutely need it. Using the super thick pink bottle glue probably isn't a good idea, as it just does the job of medium with a needless amount of extra weight.

Re: Super Glue

Posted: March 13th, 2016, 11:04 am
by rigor_boi
I also have some "E6000 Industrial Strength Adhesive." It doesn't seem to be CA, but it looks pretty legit to me. How do you guys feel about this?

Re: Super Glue

Posted: March 13th, 2016, 11:34 am
by Unome
I also have some "E6000 Industrial Strength Adhesive." It doesn't seem to be CA, but it looks pretty legit to me. How do you guys feel about this?
1) How heavy is it?
2) Can you apply it in very small amounts?
3) Is it safe?
This is assuming it's strong enough to work, which I don't know about.

Re: Super Glue

Posted: March 13th, 2016, 11:49 am
by rigor_boi
I am not quite sure about "safe". The package has several warnings about how it has "Possible Cancer Risk" and "May Cause Kidney Damage", but I will do whatever it takes to win this so that shouldn't be a big deal.

It comes in a tube without a pipette tip or anything, but I can probably get away with attaching a micro pipette tip to it or something.

"Industrial Strength" seems pretty good to me in terms of bond strength.

However, it seems like this is not feasible anyway, since I just realized the curing time is 24 hours...

Re: Super Glue

Posted: April 2nd, 2016, 9:16 pm
by bernard
"Industrial Strength" seems pretty good to me in terms of bond strength.
Note that industrial strength could apply to a specific combination of materials. Super glue works great for balsa and similar woods, but not acrylic or metal sheets. And one Amazon listing of the glue you've mentions "flexible hold," which might not be what you want.

Re: Super Glue

Posted: April 3rd, 2016, 2:07 pm
by samlan16
Some advice on cost-effectiveness: you do not need to use industrial strength CA glue if you cannot afford it. Standard Loctite CA works well too, especially the gel. The key is to let it cure overnight before moving or testing the bridge.

Re: Super Glue

Posted: April 3rd, 2016, 7:30 pm
by retired1
I do not like gel super glue for structures. It does not penetrate very deep, so it is prone to pulling off the outer growth ring or two if is on that side. For a tower, you will be gluing to both sides of the main support.
CA works fine on airplanes and gliders, but why not use thin and a kicker?? No long wait and quite strong.
My preference is still Duco with a 50-50 primer and followed by near full strength. It does not add that much weight. It does add time, but has the advantage of re-positioning members that are not exactly where you intended them to be. Also, you can undo a member joint fairly quickly with acetone. It takes a lot longer with CA and if you do not sand the old joint, new CA sometimes does not stick well. Personal experiences.

Re: Super Glue

Posted: April 4th, 2016, 5:34 am
by dholdgreve
I agree with the comment on gel cyanoacrylates... They don't penetrate deeply enough, so even though the joint hold, the wood behind the joint shears. The thin viscosity glues are very difficult to control, and even though it penetrates well, there may not be enough left at the joint for a really solid bond. I'm in favor of the medium viscosity cyanacrylates, but these too have their flaws. Any type of "super glue" will dry and become brittle. This is fine if you are building the week before competition, but I would not expect it to be as strong a month or 2 later. As for the industrial strength glues, these are unnecessary. A bridge is like a chain... only as strong as the weakest link. It is very rare that a bridge fails due to the strength of the glue. More likely the failure is a result of the quality of the joint, and even more likely it is due to a member being undersized or less dense than needed, or having an internal flaw within the wood.