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Disease Detectives B/C

Posted: August 30th, 2015, 6:34 pm
by bernard
Short Event Description: "Students will use investigative skills in the scientific study of disease, injury, health and disability in populations or groups of people with a focus on population growth."

What is the difference between infectivity, pathogenicity, and virulence?

Re: Disease Detectives B/C

Posted: September 3rd, 2015, 6:58 pm
by ampy1234567
What is the difference between infectivity, pathogenicity, and virulence?
The infectivity of an agent refers to its ability to enter/infect a susceptible host, pathogenicity is the ability of a disease to actually cause disease once it enters, and virulence is how severe the disease the agent causes actually is.

Re: Disease Detectives B/C

Posted: September 3rd, 2015, 8:25 pm
by bernard
Great, hit the main points! Here's an answer I found online that adds some examples, too:

"Infectivity is an organism's (a bacteria, virus, fungus, parasite, etc.) ability to infect you. You can be infected but not sick, and there are plenty of times when you're infected but the organism doesn't cause disease.

Pathogenicity is a organism's ability to cause disease. Some organisms are harmless and can live on you or in you without you even noticing. But, if they do cause some sort of disease process, then they are called "pathogens". Some pathogens are less pathogenic than others. For example, E. coli is pathogenic depending on the strain. Others are pathogenic all the time, like HIV, where you will progress to AIDS almost 100% of the time.

Virulence is a measure of the degree of disease that a pathogen causes. For example, there are some very virulent influenza viruses out there that will knock you out and might even kill you. On the other hand, you might catch a strain that infects you, causes disease, but the disease isn't so bad. In that case, the organism is infectious, pathogenic, but not very virulent. Ebola, on the other hand, is very infectious, very pathogenic (because most people who are infected develop disease), and very virulent (because it causes a severe, often fatal disease)."

Re: Disease Detectives B/C

Posted: September 6th, 2015, 7:55 am
by ampy1234567
Um wait if an agent infects you, does it just mean it enters your body or does it mean anything else?

Okay now for the actual question:

What are the differences between each type of disease prevention? (primary, secondary, etc.)

Re: Disease Detectives B/C

Posted: September 6th, 2015, 2:55 pm
by bernard
Um wait if an agent infects you, does it just mean it enters your body or does it mean anything else?
My understanding is infection is an external agent entering the body and the reaction of the host, your body, to the agent.

I didn't answer the marathon question so someone else should.

Re: Disease Detectives B/C

Posted: October 22nd, 2015, 3:33 pm
by ampy1234567
Wow dead

C'mon guys this is a really easy search-up question

Re: Disease Detectives B/C

Posted: November 1st, 2015, 2:48 pm
by UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F
Um wait if an agent infects you, does it just mean it enters your body or does it mean anything else?

Okay now for the actual question:

What are the differences between each type of disease prevention? (primary, secondary, etc.)
Primary prevention: prevents exposure

Secondary prevention: screens and treats disease

Tertiary prevention: stops, slows, or reverses spread of disease

Quaternary prevention: avoids unnecessary intervention

Re: Disease Detectives B/C

Posted: November 2nd, 2015, 5:10 am
by ampy1234567
Um wait if an agent infects you, does it just mean it enters your body or does it mean anything else?

Okay now for the actual question:

What are the differences between each type of disease prevention? (primary, secondary, etc.)
Primary prevention: prevents exposure

Secondary prevention: screens and treats disease

Tertiary prevention: stops, slows, or reverses spread of disease

Quaternary prevention: avoids unnecessary intervention
Correct, except I think that tertiary prevention means treating the disease in the patient and secondary only refers to treatment in the asymptomatic stage.

Re: Disease Detectives B/C

Posted: November 3rd, 2015, 9:53 am
by UTF-8 U+6211 U+662F
All right. It's been a while since I did this...

What type of epidemic curve is this?

Image

Re: Disease Detectives B/C

Posted: November 3rd, 2015, 5:43 pm
by ampy1234567
All right. It's been a while since I did this...

What type of epidemic curve is this?

Image
(Common source) Edit: oooops I forgot intermittent