Astronomy C

Test your knowledge of various Science Olympiad events.
User avatar
Magikarpmaster629
Exalted Member
Exalted Member
Posts: 578
Joined: October 7th, 2014, 3:03 pm
Division: Grad
State: MA
Location: No idea, but I can tell you exactly how fast I'm going

Re: Astronomy C

Postby Magikarpmaster629 » February 24th, 2016, 12:24 pm

1. What is an H II region?
2. What gives them their name?
3. Which of the DSOs on the list contain an H II region?
4. When we observe H II regions, what color do we see them as?
Ladue Science Olympiad (2014ish-2017)

A wild goose flies over a pond, leaving behind a voice in the wind.
A man passes through this world, leaving behind a name.

User avatar
Magikarpmaster629
Exalted Member
Exalted Member
Posts: 578
Joined: October 7th, 2014, 3:03 pm
Division: Grad
State: MA
Location: No idea, but I can tell you exactly how fast I'm going

Re: Astronomy C

Postby Magikarpmaster629 » March 4th, 2016, 12:06 pm

Is this dead? :(
Ladue Science Olympiad (2014ish-2017)

A wild goose flies over a pond, leaving behind a voice in the wind.
A man passes through this world, leaving behind a name.

User avatar
Adi1008
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 473
Joined: December 6th, 2013, 1:56 pm
Division: Grad
State: TX
Location: Austin, Texas

Re: Astronomy C

Postby Adi1008 » March 4th, 2016, 1:17 pm

Is this dead? :(
Not anymore
1. a region of ionized hydrogen in space that when recombined with an electron, emits light at 656nm when the electron goes from n = 3 to n = 2 (called H alpha)
2. not sure, but is it because they contain ionized hydrogen, which is called H II?
3. M42
4. red (since they emit light at 656nm which is reddish light)
University of Texas at Austin '22
Seven Lakes High School '18
Beckendorff Junior High '14

User avatar
Magikarpmaster629
Exalted Member
Exalted Member
Posts: 578
Joined: October 7th, 2014, 3:03 pm
Division: Grad
State: MA
Location: No idea, but I can tell you exactly how fast I'm going

Re: Astronomy C

Postby Magikarpmaster629 » March 4th, 2016, 1:27 pm

Is this dead? :(
Not anymore
1. a region of ionized hydrogen in space that when recombined with an electron, emits light at 656nm when the electron goes from n = 3 to n = 2 (called H alpha)
2. not sure, but is it because they contain ionized hydrogen, which is called H II?
3. M42
4. red (since they emit light at 656nm which is reddish light)
yep :)
Ladue Science Olympiad (2014ish-2017)

A wild goose flies over a pond, leaving behind a voice in the wind.
A man passes through this world, leaving behind a name.

User avatar
Adi1008
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 473
Joined: December 6th, 2013, 1:56 pm
Division: Grad
State: TX
Location: Austin, Texas

Re: Astronomy C

Postby Adi1008 » March 8th, 2016, 2:11 pm

Is this dead? :(
Not anymore
1. a region of ionized hydrogen in space that when recombined with an electron, emits light at 656nm when the electron goes from n = 3 to n = 2 (called H alpha)
2. not sure, but is it because they contain ionized hydrogen, which is called H II?
3. M42
4. red (since they emit light at 656nm which is reddish light)
yep :)
Do main sequence stars spin faster or slower than protostars of the same final mass? Why?
University of Texas at Austin '22
Seven Lakes High School '18
Beckendorff Junior High '14

User avatar
finagle29
Exalted Member
Exalted Member
Posts: 51
Joined: January 28th, 2013, 11:37 am
Division: Grad
State: PA
Location: Caltech

Re: Astronomy C

Postby finagle29 » March 8th, 2016, 2:31 pm

Main sequence stars spin slower than protostars of the same final mass; protostars have a greater radius and therefore greater rotational inertia so by the conservation of angular momentum as a protostar condenses further into a main sequence star it must spin faster.
Bayard Rustin HS Alum

2013 Events: Thermo, Circuit Lab, Experiment, Robot Arm
2014 Events: Circuit Lab, Experiment, TPS, Mat Sci, Astro
2015 Events: Astro, Chem Lab, Compound Machines, Experiment, Time, TPS
2016 Events: Astro, Cell Bio, Chem Lab, Electric Vehicle, Time, Protein Modeling, Wind Power

User avatar
Magikarpmaster629
Exalted Member
Exalted Member
Posts: 578
Joined: October 7th, 2014, 3:03 pm
Division: Grad
State: MA
Location: No idea, but I can tell you exactly how fast I'm going

Re: Astronomy C

Postby Magikarpmaster629 » March 8th, 2016, 3:16 pm

Main sequence stars spin slower than protostars of the same final mass; protostars have a greater radius and therefore greater rotational inertia so by the conservation of angular momentum as a protostar condenses further into a main sequence star it must spin faster.
Wouldn't a higher rotational inertia cause them to spin more slowly, given they are the same mass?
Ladue Science Olympiad (2014ish-2017)

A wild goose flies over a pond, leaving behind a voice in the wind.
A man passes through this world, leaving behind a name.

User avatar
finagle29
Exalted Member
Exalted Member
Posts: 51
Joined: January 28th, 2013, 11:37 am
Division: Grad
State: PA
Location: Caltech

Re: Astronomy C

Postby finagle29 » March 8th, 2016, 7:42 pm

Main sequence stars spin [b][i][u]faster[/u][/i][/b] than protostars of the same final mass; protostars have a greater radius and therefore greater rotational inertia so by the conservation of angular momentum as a protostar condenses further into a main sequence star it must spin faster.
Wouldn't a higher rotational inertia cause them to spin more slowly, given they are the same mass?
You're right. I thought one think and typed the other.
Bayard Rustin HS Alum

2013 Events: Thermo, Circuit Lab, Experiment, Robot Arm
2014 Events: Circuit Lab, Experiment, TPS, Mat Sci, Astro
2015 Events: Astro, Chem Lab, Compound Machines, Experiment, Time, TPS
2016 Events: Astro, Cell Bio, Chem Lab, Electric Vehicle, Time, Protein Modeling, Wind Power

User avatar
Adi1008
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 473
Joined: December 6th, 2013, 1:56 pm
Division: Grad
State: TX
Location: Austin, Texas

Re: Astronomy C

Postby Adi1008 » March 14th, 2016, 5:19 pm

Main sequence stars spin [b][i][u]faster[/u][/i][/b] than protostars of the same final mass; protostars have a greater radius and therefore greater rotational inertia so by the conservation of angular momentum as a protostar condenses further into a main sequence star it must spin faster.
Wouldn't a higher rotational inertia cause them to spin more slowly, given they are the same mass?
You're right. I thought one think and typed the other.
Both of you are (now) right, y'all can choose who asks the next question

(sorry for the late response; I completely forgot about this)
University of Texas at Austin '22
Seven Lakes High School '18
Beckendorff Junior High '14

User avatar
Magikarpmaster629
Exalted Member
Exalted Member
Posts: 578
Joined: October 7th, 2014, 3:03 pm
Division: Grad
State: MA
Location: No idea, but I can tell you exactly how fast I'm going

Re: Astronomy C

Postby Magikarpmaster629 » March 22nd, 2016, 5:33 pm

I guess I'll go.

Explain the gravitational instability theory of gas giant formation, and some of its flaws.
Ladue Science Olympiad (2014ish-2017)

A wild goose flies over a pond, leaving behind a voice in the wind.
A man passes through this world, leaving behind a name.


Return to “2016 Question Marathons”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests