Food Science B

SPP SciO
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Re: Food Science B

Postby SPP SciO » January 30th, 2017, 9:57 am

(5) scales that measured to .01 grams (These are not as expensive as you might think. We bought all 5 for less than $70.00). .
Would you be able to post a link? If I could find find scales with that resolution at that price, I'd buy several myself!
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MS 821 Sunset Park Prep
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dholdgreve
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Re: Food Science B

Postby dholdgreve » January 30th, 2017, 10:12 am

Here is the ones we bought... They also have scales that register to .001... for $16.00 be we felt that without tent or cover, the third decimal place was probably insignificant.
https://www.amazon.com/WAOAW-Digital-St ... tal+scales
Dan Holdgreve
Northmont Science Olympiad

Dedicated to the Memory of Len Joeris
"For the betterment of Science"

cwscio
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Re: Food Science B

Postby cwscio » February 3rd, 2017, 7:02 am

Has anyone evaluated the equations found in the 2017 power point on Soinc.org/food science?

I have asked a chemical engineer to assist us with the equations. He looked at the power point and shook his head at the manner in which it was written.

Also, the last slide lists these equations.
Determine ΔH = mCΔt/n=100(4.18)Δt/n
Divide by 1000 to turn to kJ/g
Divide by the efficiency of your system
Divide by 4.186 to change to Calories
Compare to accepted value of Cheetos Crunchy of 5.17 Calories/g

What specifically is the "n" in this equation when you burn the cheeto? A previous slide states the "n" is the change in candle.
The equation I was told to use to determine the calories is
Calories = change H / efficiency which would give me the heat of combustion
Then dividing this number by the weight loss of the food would give me Calories.
Dividing this number by 1000 would give me the kilocalories.

An example with step by step calculations for a hypothetical burning written by an event supervisor would be appreciated so that both students and coaches could be on the same page.

Thank you

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Re: Food Science B

Postby Sasstiel » February 3rd, 2017, 8:49 am

Has anyone evaluated the equations found in the 2017 power point on Soinc.org/food science?

I have asked a chemical engineer to assist us with the equations. He looked at the power point and shook his head at the manner in which it was written.

Also, the last slide lists these equations.
Determine ΔH = mCΔt/n=100(4.18)Δt/n
Divide by 1000 to turn to kJ/g
Divide by the efficiency of your system
Divide by 4.186 to change to Calories
Compare to accepted value of Cheetos Crunchy of 5.17 Calories/g

What specifically is the "n" in this equation when you burn the cheeto? A previous slide states the "n" is the change in candle.
The equation I was told to use to determine the calories is
Calories = change H / efficiency which would give me the heat of combustion
Then dividing this number by the weight loss of the food would give me Calories.
Dividing this number by 1000 would give me the kilocalories.

An example with step by step calculations for a hypothetical burning written by an event supervisor would be appreciated so that both students and coaches could be on the same page.

Thank you
I would suggest not using that; the rules call for joules/gram. However, if you want to find calories, here's the equation I use...

Q=m*c*ΔT. Q is the number of calories, m is the measurement of water (in grams, 1 mL = 1 gram), c is this equation: 1 calorie/gram*degree Celsius, and ΔT is the temperature of the water before burning subtracted by the temperature of the regular water (this is in degrees Celsius) (for example, 40-32=8).

To solve, you attain all of the measurements and sub them into the equation. You can cancel the grams and degrees Celsius, which just leaves you with calorie as your unit. For example, m=100 grams, c=1 calorie/gram*degree Celsius, and ΔT=6. You end up with 600 calories. Finally, divide by 100 to get you your answer (in this case, it would be 6).

If you want to convert calories to calories/gram, find the mass of the food before burning and divide the calories (what you just got) by that mass. Also, 1 cal/g = 4.1868 Joules/g.

I hope this helps!

*PM me if you have any questions*
DFTBA!
Exp Des, Wind, Food, and Bottle

witwi465
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Re: Food Science B

Postby witwi465 » February 8th, 2017, 5:24 am

One of the items on the list of students to bring to the competition is a 9-volt conductivity tester. I have looked it up on Amazon and it costs over $200. I will leave the link below. Is there an alternate item or a low cost one, or did I just view the wrong conductivity tester?
https://www.amazon.com/Extech-Conductiv ... B0137IN21A

Sasstiel
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Re: Food Science B

Postby Sasstiel » February 8th, 2017, 5:26 am

One of the items on the list of students to bring to the competition is a 9-volt conductivity tester. I have looked it up on Amazon and it costs over $200. I will leave the link below. Is there an alternate item or a low cost one, or did I just view the wrong conductivity tester?
https://www.amazon.com/Extech-Conductiv ... B0137IN21A
My coach says that we don't need one (which we didn't). They were too expensive to buy and too confusing to make. :)
DFTBA!
Exp Des, Wind, Food, and Bottle

Skink
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Re: Food Science B

Postby Skink » February 8th, 2017, 6:08 pm

It's an artifact from the Powder event rules. That said, they're in the rules, so competitive teams will bring them. Fortunately, they take minimal effort (or know-how) to home-make; there are instructions either on this or the National site.

Sasstiel
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Re: Food Science B

Postby Sasstiel » February 8th, 2017, 6:15 pm

It's an artifact from the Powder event rules. That said, they're in the rules, so competitive teams will bring them. Fortunately, they take minimal effort (or know-how) to home-make; there are instructions either on this or the National site.
So far, we haven't used one :) I suppose, if you want to take the time to make one, you can, but my team decided not to.
DFTBA!
Exp Des, Wind, Food, and Bottle

dholdgreve
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Re: Food Science B

Postby dholdgreve » February 9th, 2017, 5:49 am

One of the items on the list of students to bring to the competition is a 9-volt conductivity tester. I have looked it up on Amazon and it costs over $200. I will leave the link below. Is there an alternate item or a low cost one, or did I just view the wrong conductivity tester?
https://www.amazon.com/Extech-Conductiv ... B0137IN21A
There is no need to invest that kind of money. Here is one from Carolina for $28.00 that will do everything needed for this event.:
http://www.carolina.com/catalog/detail. ... AlhN8P8HAQ

We ran this event a few weeks ago and had a station where we asked the kids to put 4 soups in order from least saline to most saline. A device like this would perform admirably.
Dan Holdgreve
Northmont Science Olympiad

Dedicated to the Memory of Len Joeris
"For the betterment of Science"

Sasstiel
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Re: Food Science B

Postby Sasstiel » February 9th, 2017, 7:28 am

One of the items on the list of students to bring to the competition is a 9-volt conductivity tester. I have looked it up on Amazon and it costs over $200. I will leave the link below. Is there an alternate item or a low cost one, or did I just view the wrong conductivity tester?
https://www.amazon.com/Extech-Conductiv ... B0137IN21A
There is no need to invest that kind of money. Here is one from Carolina for $28.00 that will do everything needed for this event.:
http://www.carolina.com/catalog/detail. ... AlhN8P8HAQ

We ran this event a few weeks ago and had a station where we asked the kids to put 4 soups in order from least saline to most saline. A device like this would perform admirably.
Thank you! I will ask my coach for this :D
DFTBA!
Exp Des, Wind, Food, and Bottle


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