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Re: Astronomy C

Posted: February 13th, 2017, 6:58 pm
by Ashernoel
Avogadro wrote:
Ashernoel wrote:
Avogadro wrote:These two things, to a ridiculous degree.

Like, really, after I'm done with the event this year I'm not going to want to look at another HR diagram for several months or I may rip my eyes out.

You don't like the smooth curves? It's quite a beautiful representation of stars...

I don't like answering repeated questions on what each of the axes is and where to find certain types of stars on the diagram, more accurately. Actual representations of things (i.e. HR for M15) isn't so bad.

Yea, the irregularities on NGC 1846's are pretty awesome.

Re: Astronomy C

Posted: February 13th, 2017, 7:47 pm
by syo_astro
Perhaps you all don't like it, but someone has to make sure we don't have to tiebreak zeros...besides, basics are important!

...hope the studying is going well! :D

Re: Astronomy C

Posted: February 14th, 2017, 2:58 am
by antoine_ego
syo_astro wrote:Perhaps you all don't like it, but someone has to make sure we don't have to tiebreak zeros...besides, basics are important!

...hope the studying is going well! :D

How would one tiebreak a zero?

Re: Astronomy C

Posted: February 14th, 2017, 4:58 am
by jonboyage
antoine_ego wrote:
syo_astro wrote:Perhaps you all don't like it, but someone has to make sure we don't have to tiebreak zeros...besides, basics are important!

...hope the studying is going well! :D

How would one tiebreak a zero?


I would guess the first thing to look at is the open ended/math questions and go one by one and see who was the closest, had the formulas but didn't use them correctly, had the better answer, despite it being incorrect, etc. If there aren't any open ended questions then I'm at a loss. But at that point it's very unlikely for someone to get 0 questions right if they're all multiple choice. In fact, if there are 20 multiple choice questions with 4 options to choose from, then the chance to get all of them wrong is .3% assuming that each one was guessed on randomly.

I hope none of you guys have to get to this point though :lol:

Re: Astronomy C

Posted: February 14th, 2017, 5:03 am
by Unome
jonboyage wrote:
antoine_ego wrote:
syo_astro wrote:Perhaps you all don't like it, but someone has to make sure we don't have to tiebreak zeros...besides, basics are important!

...hope the studying is going well! :D

How would one tiebreak a zero?


I would guess the first thing to look at is the open ended/math questions and go one by one and see who was the closest, had the formulas but didn't use them correctly, had the better answer, despite it being incorrect, etc. If there aren't any open ended questions then I'm at a loss. But at that point it's very unlikely for someone to get 0 questions right if they're all multiple choice. In fact, if there are 20 multiple choice questions with 4 options to choose from, then the chance to get all of them wrong is .3% assuming that each one was guessed on randomly.

I hope none of you guys have to get to this point though :lol:

After grading some tests earlier this year, I no longer question the ability of people to do really badly.

tbh if someone actually gets zero correct with no partial credit-type stuff to go by, I'd go by number of questions answered, etc. If that doesn't work they'll probably just get marked as P.

Re: Astronomy C

Posted: February 14th, 2017, 5:15 am
by Avogadro
Honestly, if you get a zero it seems like you have bigger problems than tiebreakers :P

Re: Astronomy C

Posted: February 14th, 2017, 1:21 pm
by syo_astro
Yeah, usually it's been who answered more questions or using open-ended questions (I like using open-ended ones, others like who answered more, some prefer multiple choice...I dislike multiple guess). I haven't actually had to for any, but I've gotten close and tiebreaking has been a major pain sometimes. Some of the tryout tests I made have been so hard I often saw scores of only 1 or 2, and people often tied at a low raw score for the max. Of course, I thought it wasn't so bad...Hard tests are good, but balanced tests are better.

Point is that people may not get 0s, but you don't want the case where it gets really close to that/make a test so impossible it's discouraging and most do badly. Some people may like impossible, so this is why balance is important. As such, you get random easy HR diagram questions, and you will always get those. Alas, at least look forward to getting some points! I do know the complaint for harder questions, though, is normally because of random test writers at regionals copying qs, etc...but doesn't mean some easy standard qs are bad.

Re: Astronomy C

Posted: February 20th, 2017, 11:16 am
by Magikarpmaster629
Anyone know where I can find some good radial velocity plot and transit light curve generators for binary systems? I had a good site for exoplanets last year, but it doesn't work as well for stars.

Re: Astronomy C

Posted: February 20th, 2017, 11:52 am
by Adi1008
Magikarpmaster629 wrote:Anyone know where I can find some good radial velocity plot and transit light curve generators for binary systems? I had a good site for exoplanets last year, but it doesn't work as well for stars.

If you want perfectly circular orbits just graph sine waves with different amplitudes. If you want elliptical orbits, maybe you could just find real light curves of objects that have elliptical orbits

Re: Astronomy C

Posted: February 20th, 2017, 7:06 pm
by Ashernoel
Adi1008 wrote:
Magikarpmaster629 wrote:Anyone know where I can find some good radial velocity plot and transit light curve generators for binary systems? I had a good site for exoplanets last year, but it doesn't work as well for stars.

If you want perfectly circular orbits just graph sine waves with different amplitudes. If you want elliptical orbits, maybe you could just find real light curves of objects that have elliptical orbits

I'm new to Astro this year, but I learned about those by using google and looking at national tests from the past. One of them has annotated solutions and it is really good, but I can not remember which. If I get to make an SSSSS test next year for Astronomy, I'll be sure to include those types of problems (probably, if the topic allows).

Re: Astronomy C

Posted: February 25th, 2017, 10:43 am
by syo_astro
Ashernoel wrote:I'm new to Astro this year, but I learned about those by using google and looking at national tests from the past. One of them has annotated solutions and it is really good, but I can not remember which. If I get to make an SSSSS test next year for Astronomy, I'll be sure to include those types of problems (probably, if the topic allows).


Just to note it's actually SSSS ;) (there is indeed much S in the acronym, though...).

Re: Astronomy C

Posted: March 5th, 2017, 9:37 am
by Adi1008
Here's my Astronomy test from the recent Katy Regional Tournament, held at Beckendorff Junior High (key). If you have any questions about it, feel free to PM or email me!

(edit: for 7.g on the answer key, it should read 3999.8, not 4000.2)

Re: Astronomy C

Posted: March 5th, 2017, 11:05 am
by Ashernoel
Adi1008 wrote:Here's my Astronomy test from the recent Katy Regional Tournament, held at Beckendorff Junior High (key). If you have any questions about it, feel free to PM or email me!

Are there any rules or regulations for high schoolers to be event supervisors? Or do you just apply / ask like anybody else with an application?

Re: Astronomy C

Posted: March 5th, 2017, 12:39 pm
by Unome
Ashernoel wrote:
Adi1008 wrote:Here's my Astronomy test from the recent Katy Regional Tournament, held at Beckendorff Junior High (key). If you have any questions about it, feel free to PM or email me!

Are there any rules or regulations for high schoolers to be event supervisors? Or do you just apply / ask like anybody else with an application?

I don't know how it is in Illinois (though likely mroe formal than in other areas) but many regionals are sufficiently short on event supervisors that they'll pretty much take any adult with a pulse, and any high schooler who's sufficiently competent. However, I've not heard of someone writing a regional test for their own division before.

Nice test btw Adi; I scored 26/37 on the first part, and 13/26 on the second part (I completely flipped 7a through 7d and lost 8 points there ugh). How does that compare?

Re: Astronomy C

Posted: March 5th, 2017, 1:20 pm
by Skink
It's not unheard of to see high schoolers supervising B division with adult oversight at lower levels of competition, but I'd be leery of them doing their own division considering conflicts of interest, content area and assessment expertise, ES experience, or what have you. My guess would be that Adi wrote the test, passed it to a proctor, and didn't compete in the event at that tournament. If not, well...the world's a big place. :geek: