Dynamic Planet B/C

freed2003
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby freed2003 » Tue Feb 28, 2017 7:25 am

If you know the age of different islands, how do you find where the tectonic plates are moving? I thought they would move toward the younger plates but in the test I was looking through it said it moved toward the older islands.
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby driedmango » Tue Feb 28, 2017 4:33 pm

freed2003 wrote:If you know the age of different islands, how do you find where the tectonic plates are moving? I thought they would move toward the younger plates but in the test I was looking through it said it moved toward the older islands.

The direction of plate movement would be whatever direction the tail of the island chain points to (if you're talking about hotspot islands). The hotspot is stationary and the plate moves, so the youngest island would be closest to the hotspot and the oldest island would be furthest. That means that the direction of plate movement would be in the direction of the older islands. It's kind of hard to explain (or maybe I'm just bad at explaining...). Look up a map of the Hawaii island chain's movement if this is isn't helpful lol.
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby Skink » Wed Mar 01, 2017 3:18 am

An analogy I use is a conveyor belt making...candies or something. The oldest ones are further along the belt; the youngest ones were just spat out of the machine! I find myself misreading my hot spot map occasionally because I do think it's not totally intuitive (which, by the way, if you don't have that map yet, you can find it in that book I was raving about a page or two back...haven't found anything better).

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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby tyasasvi » Thu Mar 02, 2017 12:48 am

I searched the web for like 2 hours, and I found information on intermontane basins. Can someone plz tell me what they are?

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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby tyasasvi » Thu Mar 02, 2017 12:49 am

I found no* information on it. XD

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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby Unome » Thu Mar 02, 2017 2:11 am

tyasasvi wrote:I searched the web for like 2 hours, and I found no information on intermontane basins. Can someone plz tell me what they are?

Intermontane basins form between two mountain ranges as a result of the stretching, and usually subsequent graben formation, of the land in between, with a filling-in of sediment. For example, the Basin and Range in the western US constitutes a series of parallel mountain ridges/ranges and depressions, formed by alternating horst/graben sequences or a series of tilted half-graben (varies based on the particular location) with the depressions filled with sediment. Each of these depressions would be an intermontane basin. The term is a sort of catch-all term for "other" basins.
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby appleshake123 » Thu Mar 02, 2017 5:50 pm

driedmango wrote:
freed2003 wrote:Could someone give me an example of a question about glaciers? Because all I have on my notes are land forms made of glaciers

I haven't seen many glaciers questions at all on tests this year. I think tectonics focuses more on plate movement and mechanisms that drive it and stuff. The only thing you might see about glaciers on a test would probably be isostasy related (ex. what is it called when land originally covered by glaciers rises to its original elevation after the glaciers retreat?).


A clear example of this is seen in the Alps. Glacial isostatic uplift is due to the loss of continental ice sheets.
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby freed2003 » Sun Mar 05, 2017 8:56 pm

Image
Why does the left most strip have normal polarity?
Also how can you draw magnetic striiping>(use dark for normal polarity)
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby driedmango » Mon Mar 06, 2017 12:26 am

freed2003 wrote:Why does the left most strip have normal polarity?
Also how can you draw magnetic striiping>(use dark for normal polarity)

As new magma comes up at the mid-ocean ridge and cools, it records magnetic north, creating stripes of normal/reversed polarities that are mirror images on either side of the ridge. When you're talking about the left-most strip, I'm assuming you mean the stripe of light orange. So that strip would have a normal polarity because when that magma was cooling, earth's magnetic north was the same as it is currently (and it also matches the strip of normal polarity on the right side).

To draw the pattern of reversals, you might want to do something like this:
Image
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby Sleepy » Mon Mar 06, 2017 11:42 am

At an invitational earlier this year, I received this question:

The mantle's transition zone is characterized by an abundance of what compound?

And the answer was "hydroxide".

Can anybody explain why? I can't find any information on the internet about this.
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby Unome » Mon Mar 06, 2017 12:53 pm

Sleepy wrote:At an invitational earlier this year, I received this question:

The mantle's transition zone is characterized by an abundance of what compound?

And the answer was "hydroxide".

Can anybody explain why? I can't find any information on the internet about this.

From a Google search and some prior knowledge: the mantle transition zone apparently contains a lot of the mineral peridotite (an ultramafic rock), which is formed by adding hydroxide to olivine. I'm not sure if that's much of an answer (the question is rather strangely worded, since there shouldn't be much free hydroxide anywhere in the mantle).
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby freed2003 » Mon Mar 06, 2017 10:55 pm

Why does the brittle-ductile change occur? From a search it says because fractures become closed, what does this mean?
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby Unome » Mon Mar 06, 2017 11:11 pm

freed2003 wrote:Why does the brittle-ductile change occur? From a search it says because fractures become closed, what does this mean?
This is the website http://www.tulane.edu/~sanelson/eens1110/deform.htm

The change is just a result of the chemical properties of the mantle; at a certain temperature it starts behaving more like a fluid than a solid, and reacts accordingly to stress.
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby Sleepy » Mon Mar 06, 2017 11:13 pm

freed2003 wrote:Why does the brittle-ductile change occur? From a search it says because fractures become closed, what does this mean?
This is the website http://www.tulane.edu/~sanelson/eens1110/deform.htm

The brittle-ductile transition zone (its proper name) is characterized by a certain depth where the temperature is hot enough to change the rocks from a solid state to a more plastic and fluid state. Above the transition zone where the rocks are colder and more rigid, they break more easily when subjected to stress when compared to rocks below the transition zone where rocks are hotter and plastic enough to where the plastic can be bent/folded more easily.

I think it's saying fractures are closed below the transition zone because the rocks are more fluid and the rock is able to bend so that the fractures are closed within the rock, although I'm not 100% sure... that would be my guess.

EDIT: Sorry Unome, I was typing my answer as you submitted your's so I didn't see your answer, and I don't know how to delete my post. I guess there are 2 answers now!
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Re: Dynamic Planet B/C

Postby jakool6 » Tue Mar 07, 2017 1:42 am

Why are Dynamic tests so loooooooong?


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