Page 8 of 12

Re: Remote Sensing C

Posted: March 5th, 2017, 2:23 pm
by Unome
Oh, since P1V1=P2V2 and since at the bottom pressure is highest, then we know the temp would be lower?? Shouldn't it be the other way around then?

Interesting idea.
I'm pretty sure temperature increases linearly with pressure, though I could be remembering wrong (PV=nRT so P~=T)

Re: Remote Sensing C

Posted: March 5th, 2017, 2:25 pm
by hearthstone224
Silly me.

P1/T1=P2/T2. You are right.

Ok, so if the pressure goes up, the temperature must rise with it. That makes sense, thanks guys!

Re: Remote Sensing C

Posted: March 5th, 2017, 2:32 pm
by hearthstone224
Hey guys, another question!

In some locations, the aerosol optical depth is close to 1.0 At such locations, what percentage of direct sunlight reaches the earth's surface?

The answer I'm not sure of. Is it 100 percent? What is optical depth is probably what I should figure out first. Is it from 0 to 1? Thanks.

Re: Remote Sensing C

Posted: March 5th, 2017, 2:39 pm
by hearthstone224
While I'm at it, here's another one.

In an energy balance model, what effect does increasing CO2 concetration in the atmosphere have on the total outgoing energy flux at the top of the Earth's atmosphere?

If you guys are curious, I'm getting these question from the Loyola Invite test which hosted 40 or so teams, some of which are going to nationals. Pretty tough test for sure.

Re: Remote Sensing C

Posted: March 6th, 2017, 7:48 am
by windu34
While I'm at it, here's another one.

In an energy balance model, what effect does increasing CO2 concetration in the atmosphere have on the total outgoing energy flux at the top of the Earth's atmosphere?

If you guys are curious, I'm getting these question from the Loyola Invite test which hosted 40 or so teams, some of which are going to nationals. Pretty tough test for sure.
There will be an increase in total outgoing energy flux

Re: Remote Sensing C

Posted: March 6th, 2017, 8:19 am
by hearthstone224
windu, what is your reasoning for that answer? I thought it would be that as well since you would think the CO2 would trap heat, or something?

The answer was actually that it doesn't change the energy flux at all.

Re: Remote Sensing C

Posted: March 11th, 2017, 4:36 pm
by hearthstone224
What a way to end the season!

Not only did we beat Stevenson (good team), we were able to come first out of all 12 teams at our regionals! Sounds like little but it means so much to me.

Thank you everyone for your help. You really helped me get what I got today. Good luck to all the competitors out there!

Re: Remote Sensing C

Posted: March 23rd, 2017, 3:29 pm
by Unome
I have come across two sets of time gaps between the A-Train satellites - one measured in seconds, which is prominently displayed on several NASA-produced images, and the one in the Wikipedia article, with vastly different (and much longer) gaps. Does anyone know which of these is correct, and which is better to use as answers?

Re: Remote Sensing C

Posted: March 23rd, 2017, 3:33 pm
by Unome
I have come across two sets of time gaps between the A-Train satellites - one measured in seconds, which is prominently displayed on several NASA-produced images, and the one in the Wikipedia article, with vastly different (and much longer) gaps. Does anyone know which of these is correct, and which is better to use as answers?
Wait; are the measurement in this image measured in arcseconds, and not time? I think the Wikipedia article might be talking about time in the bullet points.

Also, does anyone know whether CloudSat or CALIPSO is in front? I've heard different things here as well.

Re: Remote Sensing C

Posted: March 23rd, 2017, 6:37 pm
by jonboyage
I have come across two sets of time gaps between the A-Train satellites - one measured in seconds, which is prominently displayed on several NASA-produced images, and the one in the Wikipedia article, with vastly different (and much longer) gaps. Does anyone know which of these is correct, and which is better to use as answers?
Wait; are the measurement in this image measured in arcseconds, and not time? I think the Wikipedia article might be talking about time in the bullet points.

Also, does anyone know whether CloudSat or CALIPSO is in front? I've heard different things here as well.

Looking at the NASA website (https://atrain.gsfc.nasa.gov/atrainsats.php), Cloudsat comes after CALIPSO. About the times, if you visit the NASA website, each satellite has its own 17 page pdf about all the information on that satellite. In the Aura pdf, it says " Aura is the trailing spacecraft in the formation and lags 15 minutes behind Aqua." However, with the exception of OCO-2, it doesn't state the times for other satellites. Despite this, I tend to believe Wikipedia for the reason that it was correct on two satellites, and that test-makers also probably tend to trust Wikipedia for quick specific information like this.