Invasive Species B/C

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chscioly
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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Postby chscioly » October 13th, 2016, 4:41 pm

Answer
Image A is cutleaf teasel, Image B is common teasel

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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Postby John Richardsim » October 13th, 2016, 5:08 pm

Answer
Image A is cutleaf teasel, Image B is common teasel
Yep, good. Your turn.
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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Postby chscioly » October 15th, 2016, 10:54 pm

Question
[img]http://www.nyis.info/user_uploads/files/2146038_garlic_mustard_flowers(1).jpg[/img] 1. Common and scientific names 2. What uses does it have? 3. Chemical control?

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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Postby tm-scioli » October 16th, 2016, 1:44 pm

1. garlic mustard alliaria petiolata
2. used as an herb and for food; some butterflies use it
3. glyphosate, can't remember anything else for sure but I think triclopyr works too

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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Postby chscioly » October 18th, 2016, 9:02 pm

Correct, your turn

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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Postby tm-scioli » October 19th, 2016, 5:20 pm

here it is
[img]http://www.pestid.msu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/Spotted-knapweed-rosette.jpg[/img] 1. names 2. when, how, and where was it introduced 3. Is there any biological control, Chemical control, Mechanical control, or Cultural control? Describe them and note which one is most effective 4. This plant is very effective at forming monotypic stands. Give the main reason why this is the case.

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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Postby John Richardsim » October 19th, 2016, 8:40 pm

here it is
[img]http://www.pestid.msu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/Spotted-knapweed-rosette.jpg[/img] 1. names 2. when, how, and where was it introduced 3. Is there any biological control, Chemical control, Mechanical control, or Cultural control? Describe them and note which one is most effective 4. This plant is very effective at forming monotypic stands. Give the main reason why this is the case.
.
1. Spotted Knapweed, [i]Centaurea stoebe[/i] 2. First introduced to North America in the 1890s as a contaminant in alfalfa seed from Asia Minor (though the only specific account of where that I have found is Victoria, British Colombia in 1893, but in ship ballast soil). In the U.S. was first reported at San Juan Islands, Washington in the early 1920s. 3. All of those types exist. Cultural control helps prevent the introduction of spotted kanpweed to an area through maintaining competitive native vegetation. Because of the fact that it aids in prevention, it is in general considered the most effective, though it can only prevent introduction where it has not already occurred (it may create competition with current infestations though). Mechanical control through hand pulling or mowing is most effective for small populations. When pulling by hand, remove the entire taproot if possible (and wear gloves, as it may cause contact dermatitis in some individuals, such as myself...). The ideal time for mowing of shoots is just prior to flowering or early into it (in other words, before seed production). For biological control, at least thirteen insect species and one fungus have been released in North America. The seed‐feeding weevils,[i] Larinus minutus[/i] and [i]L. obtusus[/i] and the root‐mining weevil [i]Cyphocleonus achates[/i] are the primary biocontrol agents used. Other pathogens are known to attack spotted knapweed, including the black leaf blight fungus [i]Alternaria alternata[/i], a common soil fungus [i]Sclerotinia sclerotiorum[/i], and a stem blight fungus [i]Fusarium avenaceum[/i] For chemical control, application of a herbicide containing aminopyralid in the spring before the plant flowers is recommended. Applying 2,4-D to rosettes in the fall or early spring also is effective. Chemical and biological treatment are more suited for larger infestations, though the specific control program would vary depending on the potential to harm desirable non-target species or otherwise contaminate the environment. 4. Spotted knapweed produces catechin, an allelopathic chemical, inhibiting the growth of surrounding plants. I better not have misidentified this...
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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Postby tm-scioli » October 20th, 2016, 7:33 pm

Yup, pretty much
flies of genus urophora are also good biocontrol

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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Postby John Richardsim » October 21st, 2016, 12:34 pm

Identify the species from the following description:

-Native to the Black Sea and Caspian Sea areas
-First detected in the St. Clair river in 1990, introduced via ballast water
-In fresh water, prefer rocky and vegetated lake shores and areas of large rivers. Can tolerate a wide spectrum of water-quality conditions.
-Outcompete the very similar, native sculpins
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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Postby tm-scioli » October 21st, 2016, 4:47 pm

pretty sure this one is round goby (I was just studying this a few hours ago)

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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Postby John Richardsim » October 21st, 2016, 4:55 pm

pretty sure this one is round goby (I was just studying this a few hours ago)
Yep, good timing! Your turn.
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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Postby tm-scioli » October 22nd, 2016, 6:14 pm

describe the factors that have made the following organisms so successful
[b]Image A[/b]
[img]https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/18/Potamopyrgus_antipodarum_2.png[/img]
[b]Image B[/b]
[img]http://www.invadingspecies.com/wp-content/gallery/butternut-canker/credit-barb-boysen-july-06-2.jpg[/img]
[b]Image C[/b]
[img]https://s3.amazonaws.com/user-media.venngage.com/469729-1bd7edd64ccbd79408b2b70fcf25d2ce.jpg[/img]
[b]Image D[/b]
[img]http://www.iucngisd.org/gisd/image/ecology/1361046.jpg[/img]

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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Postby cpagan » November 1st, 2016, 11:20 am

Organism A is the New Zealand mud snail. It reproduces very quickly and mass in high densities

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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Postby tm-scioli » November 1st, 2016, 3:58 pm

pretty much
B is butternut canker which has been successful due to lack of native tree resistance C is round goby which has been successful due to a great food source provided by zebra mussels D is formosan subterranean termite which is very effective due to large hive populations and prolific alate production also new zealand mud snail has next to no native predators

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Re: Invasive Species B/C

Postby gavinnupp » November 2nd, 2016, 4:42 am

pretty much
B is butternut canker which has been successful due to lack of native tree resistance C is round goby which has been successful due to a great food source provided by zebra mussels D is formosan subterranean termite which is very effective due to large hive populations and prolific alate production also new zealand mud snail has next to no native predators
I'm gonna politely and constructively add to your explanation of the round goby;
It has been so successful due to the abundance of resources it encountered. The Zebra Mussels were and are more of a secondary food source, as the Gobies are generalist predators. They did what many invasives do; they exploited a niche. The niche was a bottom dwelling predator, which had been filled previously by Cottus bairdii and various darters. What i'm saying is the gobies succeeded because they eat everything, not just zebra mussels.
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