Page 7 of 9

Re: Ecology B/C

Posted: December 24th, 2016, 11:38 pm
by gavinnupp
Torpor is decreased activity in an animal, with a lowered body temperature and metabolism. Daily torpor is seen in many marsupials, rodents, and bats. However, long, seasonal periods of torpor can be considered hibernation, if it is during winter, or estivation, if it is during summer, in response to dry conditions and high temperatures. Many species of squirrel hibernate and many land snails estivate.
All correct, save a few minor inaccuracies. Estivation or hibernation is not in response to dry conditions or "high" temperatures; rather, it's an instinct meant to conserve energy in times expected to entail little food or extreme temperatures.

Besides that, all good. Your go.
According to Wikipedia, estivation is in response to hot and dry conditions (to avoid losing moisture or damage from temperatures) while hibernation occurs in warm-blooded animals when their isn't gonna be enough food.

Re: Ecology B/C

Posted: December 25th, 2016, 1:55 pm
by Zioly
Torpor is decreased activity in an animal, with a lowered body temperature and metabolism. Daily torpor is seen in many marsupials, rodents, and bats. However, long, seasonal periods of torpor can be considered hibernation, if it is during winter, or estivation, if it is during summer, in response to dry conditions and high temperatures. Many species of squirrel hibernate and many land snails estivate.
All correct, save a few minor inaccuracies. Estivation or hibernation is not in response to dry conditions or "high" temperatures; rather, it's an instinct meant to conserve energy in times expected to entail little food or extreme temperatures.

Besides that, all good. Your go.
According to Wikipedia, estivation is in response to hot and dry conditions (to avoid losing moisture or damage from temperatures) while hibernation occurs in warm-blooded animals when their isn't gonna be enough food.
Correct, however all of that is interrelated. For example, the lack of food in the winter is due to the colder temperatures (as it's winter) and the drought is due to higher temperatures (as it's summer.) So, it's fair to say that both estivation and hibernation are states of prolonged torpor caused by (to some degree) extreme temperatures, and not only high temperatures, as chscioly put it.

That's how I viewed it, but I do see that most sources are saying hibernation as a response to lack of food (presumably ignoring temperature) and estivation as temp and precip. I'll put that down as something to look into later on the internet. I'm primarily referring to one source, so I might not have the most universal information right off the bat.

Re: Ecology B/C

Posted: January 4th, 2017, 5:02 pm
by Zioly
Anyone can feel free to go. I'm itching to answer some questions. :)

Re: Ecology B/C

Posted: January 4th, 2017, 9:33 pm
by SenseiSushi
Name at least two adaptations used by plants in the tundra.

Re: Ecology B/C

Posted: January 5th, 2017, 7:49 am
by Zioly
Name at least two adaptations used by plants in the tundra.
Plants in the tundra grow close to the ground and in clumps to protect against the cold.

Plants are inactive for 9 months, to wait for the annual thaw of the active layer.

The roots of these plants are adapted to growing sideways, as they can't penetrate the permafrost below.

Re: Ecology B/C

Posted: January 5th, 2017, 9:45 am
by LIPX3
If a population has an annual growth rate of 5%, what is the doubling time?
15 years

Re: Ecology B/C

Posted: January 5th, 2017, 3:13 pm
by Zioly
If a population has an annual growth rate of 5%, what is the doubling time?
15 years
Wow, I did not even see that question in the thread! Sorry about that chscioly! :D

Re: Ecology B/C

Posted: January 5th, 2017, 4:28 pm
by chscioly
If a population has an annual growth rate of 5%, what is the doubling time?
15 years
Close, it should be around 14 years, depending on which way you found the answer.
If a population has an annual growth rate of 5%, what is the doubling time?
15 years
Wow, I did not even see that question in the thread! Sorry about that chscioly! :D
No worries! :)

Re: Ecology B/C

Posted: January 5th, 2017, 10:51 pm
by SenseiSushi
Name at least two adaptations used by plants in the tundra.
Plants in the tundra grow close to the ground and in clumps to protect against the cold.

Plants are inactive for 9 months, to wait for the annual thaw of the active layer.

The roots of these plants are adapted to growing sideways, as they can't penetrate the permafrost below.
Correct! Another could be that they adapt to conducting photosynthesis in low temperature levels

In order to resolve the two ongoing threads, we can start with whoever provides a question first (Zioly or LIPX3) if that's alright.

Re: Ecology B/C

Posted: January 6th, 2017, 4:37 pm
by Zioly
Name at least two adaptations used by plants in the tundra.
Plants in the tundra grow close to the ground and in clumps to protect against the cold.

Plants are inactive for 9 months, to wait for the annual thaw of the active layer.

The roots of these plants are adapted to growing sideways, as they can't penetrate the permafrost below.
Correct! Another could be that they adapt to conducting photosynthesis in low temperature levels

In order to resolve the two ongoing threads, we can start with whoever provides a question first (Zioly or LIPX3) if that's alright.
It was my mistake. Please, LIPX3 should be the one to go. Again, sorry about that everyone. :)