Microbe Mission B/C

Test your knowledge of various Science Olympiad events.
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sciduck
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Re: Microbe Mission B/C

Postby sciduck » February 25th, 2017, 7:47 pm

Question:
Which fungal disease in the 2017 list is known to cause hallucinations
---
ergotism
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Re: Microbe Mission B/C

Postby NeilMehta » February 25th, 2017, 8:14 pm

Question:
Which fungal disease in the 2017 list is known to cause hallucinations
---
ergotism
Correct!
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Re: Microbe Mission B/C

Postby sciduck » February 26th, 2017, 7:06 am

Image
1) What type of medium is this?
2) What does this medium test?
3) What are the results of this test?
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Re: Microbe Mission B/C

Postby allopathie » April 5th, 2017, 8:19 pm

Image
1) Sulfide indole motility test (although generally I would prefer a TCC for motility only)
2) Tests for bacterial motility/indole production (tryptophanase)/reduction of sulfate to hydrogen sulfide (cysteine desulfurase)
3) A: H2S-, indole+, motile = E Coli; B: H2S-, indole-, nonmotile = SA (otherwise known as Brownian motility); C: H2S+, indole-, motile = Salmonella; D: H2S-, indole-, motile = Enterobacter; E: H2S+, indole+, motile = Proteus
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Re: Microbe Mission B/C

Postby sciduck » April 6th, 2017, 12:55 pm

Image
1) Sulfide indole motility test (although generally I would prefer a TCC for motility only)
2) Tests for bacterial motility/indole production (tryptophanase)/reduction of sulfate to hydrogen sulfide (cysteine desulfurase)
3) A: H2S-, indole+, motile = E Coli; B: H2S-, indole-, nonmotile = SA (otherwise known as Brownian motility); C: H2S+, indole-, motile = Salmonella; D: H2S-, indole-, motile = Enterobacter; E: H2S+, indole+, motile = Proteus
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Re: Microbe Mission B/C

Postby NeilMehta » April 6th, 2017, 1:53 pm

Phylum of photosynthetic bacteria?
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Re: Microbe Mission B/C

Postby The48thYoshi » April 7th, 2017, 12:40 pm

Phylum of photosynthetic bacteria?
cyanobacteria/cyanophyta and the orders chromatiales and rhodospirillacaea from the proteobacteria
Explain the impacts of cytoplasmic incompatibility
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Re: Microbe Mission B/C

Postby Ashernoel » April 11th, 2017, 9:58 am

Explain the impacts of cytoplasmic incompatibility
CI is a phenomenon that results in sperm and eggs that cannot form viable offspring and it is believed that unidirectional CI cannot promote speciation. First introduction to Wolbachia :D Some Q's from my test..

1. What does Phenol destroy in controlling microbial growth?
2. What is the lowest temperature that kills all microbes in liquid suspension for 10 minutes?

and a nice scenario xD

A high profile politician comes into the Emergency Room. He says the political turmoil is affecting his body, as he runs a high fever with headaches and a bad cough, but you do not believe the symptoms are from stress. He started developing symptoms after his wife bought him a fancy raccoon fur coat for his birthday.
3. What is the genus of the disease contracted?
4. What type of the disease did he contract?
5. What was the vector, where did the causative agent come from?
6. What treatment should be used for the politician?
7. What increases cAMP, a second messenger device?
8. Resistance to treatment in this microbial agent can be transferred through what
extracellular structure?
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Re: Microbe Mission B/C

Postby allopathie » April 11th, 2017, 11:31 am

Some Q's from my test..

1. What does Phenol destroy in controlling microbial growth?
2. What is the lowest temperature that kills all microbes in liquid suspension for 10 minutes?

and a nice scenario xD

A high profile politician comes into the Emergency Room. He says the political turmoil is affecting his body, as he runs a high fever with headaches and a bad cough, but you do not believe the symptoms are from stress. He started developing symptoms after his wife bought him a fancy raccoon fur coat for his birthday.
3. What is the genus of the disease contracted?
4. What type of the disease did he contract?
5. What was the vector, where did the causative agent come from?
6. What treatment should be used for the politician?
7. What increases cAMP, a second messenger device?
8. Resistance to treatment in this microbial agent can be transferred through what
extracellular structure?
1. Phenol deactivates enyzme systems and disrupts the cell wall
2. Thermal death point
3. Bacillus
4. Bacterial (anthrax), inhalation
5. Raccoon/spores from soil, probably
6. Penicillin G
7. Edema factor (forms calmodulin-dependent adenylyl cyclase; thanks AP Bio!)
8. Plasmids encoding beta-lactamase?
(I have no idea if I answered correctly, because anthrax generally shows up in herbivores, but the only other cAMP-inducing bacteria is cholera. Respiratory anthrax sometimes presents with cold/flu like symptoms, so this is my best guess.)
1. Which vaccine was implicated in causing the disease it was trying to prevent, and where has this most recently occurred?
Image
2. What does this image represent? What is a PFU?
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Re: Microbe Mission B/C

Postby Ashernoel » April 11th, 2017, 1:12 pm

Some Q's from my test..

1. What does Phenol destroy in controlling microbial growth?
2. What is the lowest temperature that kills all microbes in liquid suspension for 10 minutes?

and a nice scenario xD

A high profile politician comes into the Emergency Room. He says the political turmoil is affecting his body, as he runs a high fever with headaches and a bad cough, but you do not believe the symptoms are from stress. He started developing symptoms after his wife bought him a fancy raccoon fur coat for his birthday.
3. What is the genus of the disease contracted?
4. What type of the disease did he contract?
5. What was the vector, where did the causative agent come from?
6. What treatment should be used for the politician?
7. What increases cAMP, a second messenger device?
8. Resistance to treatment in this microbial agent can be transferred through what
extracellular structure?
1. Phenol deactivates enyzme systems and disrupts the cell wall
2. Thermal death point
3. Bacillus
4. Bacterial (anthrax), inhalation
5. Raccoon/spores from soil, probably
6. Penicillin G
7. Edema factor (forms calmodulin-dependent adenylyl cyclase; thanks AP Bio!)
8. Plasmids encoding beta-lactamase?
(I have no idea if I answered correctly, because anthrax generally shows up in herbivores, but the only other cAMP-inducing bacteria is cholera. Respiratory anthrax sometimes presents with cold/flu like symptoms, so this is my best guess.)
1. Which vaccine was implicated in causing the disease it was trying to prevent, and where has this most recently occurred?
Image
2. What does this image represent? What is a PFU?
In regards to your question 1. Any Live Attenuated Vaccines can cause them, rarely, if secondary mutation occurs, and it happened recently in (not sure) an oral polio vaccine.
2. This image represents the growth curve of a bacteriophage, PFU = plague forming unit
In regards to my question: 5. i was thinking raccoon fur but that's fine
8. I was thinking sex pili xD very awesomeee job i thought those were pretty hard
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Re: Microbe Mission B/C

Postby NeilMehta » April 16th, 2017, 6:47 am

New question:
What is the difference between the growth curves of bacteria and viruses
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Re: Microbe Mission B/C

Postby allopathie » April 21st, 2017, 9:45 pm

Bacteria demonstrate a lag/exponential/stationary/death while viruses demonstrate lytic/lysogenic cycles, and bacteriophages demonstrate a one-step growth curve. In what microbiological organisms are two-component regulatory systems prevalent and why are they important?
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Re: Microbe Mission B/C

Postby The48thYoshi » May 8th, 2017, 9:27 am


In what microbiological organisms are two-component regulatory systems prevalent and why are they important?
Why do I know this? lol. :geek:
Two-component regulatory systems are primarily prevalent in bacteria, mostly gram negative and Cyanobacteria. These systems enable bacteria to sense and chance to multiple environmental stimuli and adapt to their environment
Some antibiotic questions
a. What do all penicillin- based drugs have structurally in common?
b. What enzyme is responsible for resistance to penicillin?
c. What are 4 mechanisms of antibiotic resistance?
d. What are two possible downsides to penicillin?
e. Provide the name effect that occurs when antibiotics are used for enteric diseases.
f. Describe the effects of microbial Altruism on antibiotic treatments.
aeshs ‘22

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Re: Microbe Mission B/C

Postby yang573 » May 8th, 2017, 2:58 pm

Some antibiotic questions
a. What do all penicillin- based drugs have structurally in common?
b. What enzyme is responsible for resistance to penicillin?
c. What are 4 mechanisms of antibiotic resistance?
d. What are two possible downsides to penicillin?
e. Provide the name effect that occurs when antibiotics are used for enteric diseases.
f. Describe the effects of microbial Altruism on antibiotic treatments.
Answers
a. All penicillin-based drugs contain a beta-lactam ring. b. Penicillinase, also known beta-lactamase, confers resistance to penicillin. c. Antibiotic resistance comes from inactivation/degradation of the antibiotic, mutation of the target site, preventing entry of the antibiotic, and rapid ejection of the substance. d. Penicillin is eliminated from the body relatively quickly. Some people are also allergic penicillin. e. antibiotic-associated diarrhea(?) f. The more resistant members of a population may produce indole, which leads to greater antibiotic resistance among the population.
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Re: Microbe Mission B/C

Postby The48thYoshi » May 8th, 2017, 4:05 pm

Some antibiotic questions
a. What do all penicillin- based drugs have structurally in common?
b. What enzyme is responsible for resistance to penicillin?
c. What are 4 mechanisms of antibiotic resistance?
d. What are two possible downsides to penicillin?
e. Provide the name effect that occurs when antibiotics are used for enteric diseases.
f. Describe the effects of microbial Altruism on antibiotic treatments.
Answers
a. All penicillin-based drugs contain a beta-lactam ring. b. Penicillinase, also known beta-lactamase, confers resistance to penicillin. c. Antibiotic resistance comes from inactivation/degradation of the antibiotic, mutation of the target site, preventing entry of the antibiotic, and rapid ejection of the substance. d. Penicillin is eliminated from the body relatively quickly. Some people are also allergic penicillin. e. antibiotic-associated diarrhea(?) f. The more resistant members of a population may produce indole, which leads to greater antibiotic resistance among the population.
Good Job!
In regards to e, I was looking for
e
dysbiosis
Your turn
aeshs ‘22


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