Remote Sensing C

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Sean_Sylvester1
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Re: Remote Sensing C

Postby Sean_Sylvester1 » February 9th, 2017, 1:43 pm

Awesome!

Describe the difference between along track and across track scanning, and give the more informal names of these types of scanning for an extra point.
Along track (push broom) scanning works like a crop duster, it scans a wide swath of terrain and moves unilaterally

Across track (whisk broom) scanning works like an inkjet printer, it scans a line across using an oscillating mirror, then back, all at a slight skew so that the images overlap and can be stitched into one image.
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hearthstone224
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Re: Remote Sensing C

Postby hearthstone224 » February 10th, 2017, 4:53 am

Awesome!

Describe the difference between along track and across track scanning, and give the more informal names of these types of scanning for an extra point.
Along track (push broom) scanning works like a crop duster, it scans a wide swath of terrain and moves unilaterally

Across track (whisk broom) scanning works like an inkjet printer, it scans a line across using an oscillating mirror, then back, all at a slight skew so that the images overlap and can be stitched into one image.
Sounds right to me! Your turn.
End of freshman season. Good luck to everyone! No state for us, but nevertheless great season. Regional was out of 12 teams. (CLC)

Mat Sci-> Second at regionals
RSensing -> First at regionals
Towers-> Third at regionals.

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Re: Remote Sensing C

Postby Sean_Sylvester1 » February 10th, 2017, 8:58 am

BREAKING NEWS! A wildfire has been spotted near the Wright State University campus! The fire has spread rapidly and no one is quite sure how big it is. Luckily we have a solution up in space. What instrument, on what vessel would be used to measure the size of this fire? How does this instrument work. If we were to record the images today, then at what time (UTC) would the vessel need to begin scanning to pick up the region around Wright State?
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hearthstone224
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Re: Remote Sensing C

Postby hearthstone224 » February 10th, 2017, 10:39 am

Um, I really don't know any of these although I'll still give it a shot.

Here goes:

You will need MODIS (my logic is that it can measure cloud cover and CO2 concentration) and you can use Terra. You would want it to fly there ASAP, so assuming right now it would be 6:38 PM UTC.
End of freshman season. Good luck to everyone! No state for us, but nevertheless great season. Regional was out of 12 teams. (CLC)

Mat Sci-> Second at regionals
RSensing -> First at regionals
Towers-> Third at regionals.

Sean_Sylvester1
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Re: Remote Sensing C

Postby Sean_Sylvester1 » February 10th, 2017, 12:58 pm

Um, I really don't know any of these although I'll still give it a shot.

Here goes:

You will need MODIS (my logic is that it can measure cloud cover and CO2 concentration) and you can use Terra. You would want it to fly there ASAP, so assuming right now it would be 6:38 PM UTC.

Yep! Spot on, that was a tough one. So basically to figure out the time you'd need to start scanning at, you look at the predicted flight paths and that gives you a time of 16:09 UTC. Your turn!
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Re: Remote Sensing C

Postby hearthstone224 » February 13th, 2017, 7:09 am

I got it? Wow ok, that's awesome.

My question:

What are the A-Train satellites and what do they do?
End of freshman season. Good luck to everyone! No state for us, but nevertheless great season. Regional was out of 12 teams. (CLC)

Mat Sci-> Second at regionals
RSensing -> First at regionals
Towers-> Third at regionals.

Sean_Sylvester1
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Re: Remote Sensing C

Postby Sean_Sylvester1 » February 13th, 2017, 1:15 pm

I got it? Wow ok, that's awesome.

My question:

What are the A-Train satellites and what do they do?
The A-Train satellites are a series of six (originally seven) remsens that work in conjunction to compile meteorological data. They travel as a group and thus can form composite images between sensors. The satellites are

Aqua - studies the water cycle as well as volcanoes and wildfires

Aura - studies ozone, air quality, and climate

Calipso - high res vertical profiles of clouds and aerosols

Cloud Sat - radar sat which measures cloud altitude and properties

OCO-2 - measures CO2 levels

GCOM-W1 - the water cycle
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Re: Remote Sensing C

Postby Xuax » February 26th, 2017, 11:38 am

No one has posted for a few weeks, so I'll start this back up.

What type of instrument is CERES, and what is CERES used for?

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Re: Remote Sensing C

Postby Ragoat66 » February 26th, 2017, 7:37 pm

No one has posted for a few weeks, so I'll start this back up.

What type of instrument is CERES, and what is CERES used for?
Ceres is a passive sensor that measures cloud properties and radiative energy flux.

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Re: Remote Sensing C

Postby Xuax » February 27th, 2017, 8:00 am

No one has posted for a few weeks, so I'll start this back up.

What type of instrument is CERES, and what is CERES used for?
Ceres is a passive sensor that measures cloud properties and radiative energy flux.
That's right, but I would include that CERES is a radiometer and has two scanning modes: Cross-track or rotating plane. Your turn.

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Re: Remote Sensing C

Postby Ragoat66 » February 28th, 2017, 7:21 pm

Okay,

What is Aerosol Forcing?

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Re: Remote Sensing C

Postby hearthstone224 » March 1st, 2017, 7:19 am

Okay,

What is Aerosol Forcing?
I didn't exactly find Aerosol Forcing's definition, but I did find Radiative forcing.

Radiative forcing is the difference between the incoming sunlight and the outgoing sunlight. A positive forcing number is warming the system, a negative forcing number is cooling it.

I don't know if that's the definition you want.
End of freshman season. Good luck to everyone! No state for us, but nevertheless great season. Regional was out of 12 teams. (CLC)

Mat Sci-> Second at regionals
RSensing -> First at regionals
Towers-> Third at regionals.

hearthstone224
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Re: Remote Sensing C

Postby hearthstone224 » March 1st, 2017, 7:21 am

If I get it right, here's my question:

(This is actually from an invitational)

The Hubble Telescope has a diameter of 2.4 meters and orbits at a height above earth of 559 km. If it were used to observe the Earth, instead of space, what would be its theoretical limit of resolution in the visible spectrum, using Raleigh's criterion? (Disregard limits due to atmospheric effects).

A) About 15 mm
B) About 15 cm
C) About 1.5 m
D) About 15 m
E) About 150 m

Can someone help me out with this? How would you get the answer of (B)? I tried to look up Rayleigh criterion's formula but I still don't get how B comes out.
End of freshman season. Good luck to everyone! No state for us, but nevertheless great season. Regional was out of 12 teams. (CLC)

Mat Sci-> Second at regionals
RSensing -> First at regionals
Towers-> Third at regionals.

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Re: Remote Sensing C

Postby Magikarpmaster629 » March 1st, 2017, 7:35 am

If I get it right, here's my question:

(This is actually from an invitational)

The Hubble Telescope has a diameter of 2.4 meters and orbits at a height above earth of 559 km. If it were used to observe the Earth, instead of space, what would be its theoretical limit of resolution in the visible spectrum, using Raleigh's criterion? (Disregard limits due to atmospheric effects).

A) About 15 mm
B) About 15 cm
C) About 1.5 m
D) About 15 m
E) About 150 m

Can someone help me out with this? How would you get the answer of (B)? I tried to look up Rayleigh criterion's formula but I still don't get how B comes out.
Just interjecting to point out, generally posts about specific questions that you don't know the answer to belong in the event thread (viewtopic.php?f=227&p=308499#p308499), not the question marathon.
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Re: Remote Sensing C

Postby Xuax » March 1st, 2017, 7:47 am

If I get it right, here's my question:

(This is actually from an invitational)

The Hubble Telescope has a diameter of 2.4 meters and orbits at a height above earth of 559 km. If it were used to observe the Earth, instead of space, what would be its theoretical limit of resolution in the visible spectrum, using Raleigh's criterion? (Disregard limits due to atmospheric effects).

A) About 15 mm
B) About 15 cm
C) About 1.5 m
D) About 15 m
E) About 150 m

Can someone help me out with this? How would you get the answer of (B)? I tried to look up Rayleigh criterion's formula but I still don't get how B comes out.
Rayleigh's criterion says that the angular resolution of a circular aperture in radians is equal to 1.22 times the wavelength of light divided by the diameter of the aperture. When we plug in the values for this problem (assume wavelength of light is 550 nm, as that is the average wavelength of visible light), we get about 2.796 * 10^-7 radians. To find the spatial resolution, multiply the angular resolution by the distance to the object. When we do that for this problem, we get about 0.156 m, or about 15 cm.

If you have a question about Remote Sensing, ask it in the event page or PM me.


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