Remote Sensing C

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Ragoat66
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Re: Remote Sensing C

Post by Ragoat66 » February 28th, 2017, 7:21 pm

Okay,

What is Aerosol Forcing?

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Re: Remote Sensing C

Post by hearthstone224 » March 1st, 2017, 7:19 am

Ragoat66 wrote:Okay,

What is Aerosol Forcing?
I didn't exactly find Aerosol Forcing's definition, but I did find Radiative forcing.

Radiative forcing is the difference between the incoming sunlight and the outgoing sunlight. A positive forcing number is warming the system, a negative forcing number is cooling it.

I don't know if that's the definition you want.
End of freshman season. Good luck to everyone! No state for us, but nevertheless great season. Regional was out of 12 teams. (CLC)

Mat Sci-> Second at regionals
RSensing -> First at regionals
Towers-> Third at regionals.

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Re: Remote Sensing C

Post by hearthstone224 » March 1st, 2017, 7:21 am

If I get it right, here's my question:

(This is actually from an invitational)

The Hubble Telescope has a diameter of 2.4 meters and orbits at a height above earth of 559 km. If it were used to observe the Earth, instead of space, what would be its theoretical limit of resolution in the visible spectrum, using Raleigh's criterion? (Disregard limits due to atmospheric effects).

A) About 15 mm
B) About 15 cm
C) About 1.5 m
D) About 15 m
E) About 150 m

Can someone help me out with this? How would you get the answer of (B)? I tried to look up Rayleigh criterion's formula but I still don't get how B comes out.
End of freshman season. Good luck to everyone! No state for us, but nevertheless great season. Regional was out of 12 teams. (CLC)

Mat Sci-> Second at regionals
RSensing -> First at regionals
Towers-> Third at regionals.

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Re: Remote Sensing C

Post by Magikarpmaster629 » March 1st, 2017, 7:35 am

hearthstone224 wrote:If I get it right, here's my question:

(This is actually from an invitational)

The Hubble Telescope has a diameter of 2.4 meters and orbits at a height above earth of 559 km. If it were used to observe the Earth, instead of space, what would be its theoretical limit of resolution in the visible spectrum, using Raleigh's criterion? (Disregard limits due to atmospheric effects).

A) About 15 mm
B) About 15 cm
C) About 1.5 m
D) About 15 m
E) About 150 m

Can someone help me out with this? How would you get the answer of (B)? I tried to look up Rayleigh criterion's formula but I still don't get how B comes out.
Just interjecting to point out, generally posts about specific questions that you don't know the answer to belong in the event thread (viewtopic.php?f=227&p=308499#p308499), not the question marathon.
Ladue Science Olympiad (2014ish-2017)

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Re: Remote Sensing C

Post by Xuax » March 1st, 2017, 7:47 am

hearthstone224 wrote:If I get it right, here's my question:

(This is actually from an invitational)

The Hubble Telescope has a diameter of 2.4 meters and orbits at a height above earth of 559 km. If it were used to observe the Earth, instead of space, what would be its theoretical limit of resolution in the visible spectrum, using Raleigh's criterion? (Disregard limits due to atmospheric effects).

A) About 15 mm
B) About 15 cm
C) About 1.5 m
D) About 15 m
E) About 150 m

Can someone help me out with this? How would you get the answer of (B)? I tried to look up Rayleigh criterion's formula but I still don't get how B comes out.
Rayleigh's criterion says that the angular resolution of a circular aperture in radians is equal to 1.22 times the wavelength of light divided by the diameter of the aperture. When we plug in the values for this problem (assume wavelength of light is 550 nm, as that is the average wavelength of visible light), we get about 2.796 * 10^-7 radians. To find the spatial resolution, multiply the angular resolution by the distance to the object. When we do that for this problem, we get about 0.156 m, or about 15 cm.

If you have a question about Remote Sensing, ask it in the event page or PM me.

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Re: Remote Sensing C

Post by hearthstone224 » March 1st, 2017, 9:05 am

Sorry about that guys. Correct, your turn Xuax.
End of freshman season. Good luck to everyone! No state for us, but nevertheless great season. Regional was out of 12 teams. (CLC)

Mat Sci-> Second at regionals
RSensing -> First at regionals
Towers-> Third at regionals.

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Re: Remote Sensing C

Post by Xuax » March 1st, 2017, 9:34 am

What is the peak wavelength of a blackbody at temperature 310 K?

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Re: Remote Sensing C

Post by hearthstone224 » March 1st, 2017, 9:41 am

Xuax wrote:What is the peak wavelength of a blackbody at temperature 310 K?
You can use Wein's law so you can do:

0.29/310K = 0.000935483871 nm. That's in the gamma ray range I think.
End of freshman season. Good luck to everyone! No state for us, but nevertheless great season. Regional was out of 12 teams. (CLC)

Mat Sci-> Second at regionals
RSensing -> First at regionals
Towers-> Third at regionals.

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Re: Remote Sensing C

Post by Private Wang Fire » March 1st, 2017, 10:50 am

hearthstone224 wrote:
Xuax wrote:What is the peak wavelength of a blackbody at temperature 310 K?
You can use Wein's law so you can do:

0.29/310K = 0.000935483871 nm. That's in the gamma ray range I think.
Er, either your units out constant are incorrect I think. No way the wavelength is that low at 310K.
MASON HIGH SCHOOL '18

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Re: Remote Sensing C

Post by Xuax » March 1st, 2017, 11:16 am

Private Wang Fire wrote:
hearthstone224 wrote:
Xuax wrote:What is the peak wavelength of a blackbody at temperature 310 K?
You can use Wein's law so you can do:

0.29/310K = 0.000935483871 nm. That's in the gamma ray range I think.
Er, either your units out constant are incorrect I think. No way the wavelength is that low at 310K.
If that was in centimeters, it would be correct. Remember, Wien's displacement constant is 2.8977729 × 10^-3 m K. That divided by 310 K gives 9.34765452e-6 m, which in nm is 9347.6 nm.

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