Astronomy C

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Magikarpmaster629
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Re: Astronomy C

Postby Magikarpmaster629 » October 14th, 2016, 6:42 am

Sorry this took so long!
Image
1. Which DSOs does this image depict (note the size difference of the two objects)?
2. These DSOs are progenitors of what type of binary star system?
3. These DSOs are potentially progenitors of what two types of explosions? Briefly describe each explosion type.
1. J075141 and J174140.
2. AM CVn binary system.
3. Type Ia Supernovae - the heavier white dwarf accretes enough mass to surpass the Chandrasekhar limit of 1.4 solar masses, accumulating enough pressure and exploding.
.Ia supernovae - the explosion occurs only on the surface of the star, leaving it simply damaged. The explosion is 1/10 the brightness of a Type Ia supernovae.
A .Ia supernova isn't necessarily 1/10th the brightness, only a 'fraction' of the brightness. Also, the explosions are thermonuclear driven, not simply pressure driven. Otherwise correct.
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Re: Astronomy C

Postby bhavjain » October 17th, 2016, 1:40 pm

Describe the triple-alpha and alpha process. What happens when a massive star fuses iron?
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Re: Astronomy C

Postby Unome » October 17th, 2016, 3:57 pm

Pretty sure the triple-alpha process is 3 helium atoms forming a carbon atom. Iron fusion has a negative energy yield, so the star basically starts losing it's energy (or something like that, idk).
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Re: Astronomy C

Postby sciduck » October 17th, 2016, 5:18 pm

Pretty sure the triple-alpha process is 3 helium atoms forming a carbon atom. Iron fusion has a negative energy yield, so the star basically starts losing it's energy (or something like that, idk).
Adding on:
i think the helium atoms are specifically alpha particles (2 neutrons) and iron fusion absorbs energy --> temperature drop(?)
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Re: Astronomy C

Postby bhavjain » October 18th, 2016, 6:34 am

Pretty sure the triple-alpha process is 3 helium atoms forming a carbon atom. Iron fusion has a negative energy yield, so the star basically starts losing it's energy (or something like that, idk).
Adding on:
i think the helium atoms are specifically alpha particles (2 neutrons) and iron fusion absorbs energy --> temperature drop(?)
Correct. Also, the alpha process converts helium into heavier elements, a process seen in heavy main sequence stars.
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Re: Astronomy C

Postby bhavjain » November 17th, 2016, 1:39 pm

Let's revive this.

By how much is the oribital period of RX J0806.3+1527 decreasing each year?

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Re: Astronomy C

Postby dcrxcode » November 19th, 2016, 6:40 pm

Let's revive this.

By how much is the oribital period of RX J0806.3+1527 decreasing each year?
1.2 milliseconds per year

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Re: Astronomy C

Postby bhavjain » November 19th, 2016, 10:08 pm

Let's revive this.

By how much is the oribital period of RX J0806.3+1527 decreasing each year?
1.2 milliseconds per year
Correct. Your turn.

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Re: Astronomy C

Postby dcrxcode » November 20th, 2016, 8:27 am

In about 700 million years, what will happen to the DSO shown in the image below?

http://www.universetoday.com/wp-content ... o1505a.jpg

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Re: Astronomy C

Postby appleshake123 » November 21st, 2016, 1:37 pm

Let's revive this.

By how much is the oribital period of RX J0806.3+1527 decreasing each year?
Sorry if I'm stupid, but what is the relevance of RX JO806.3+1527 to this year? I do not believe it is one of the DSO's.


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